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Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Borjas, George J.
Bronars, Stephen G.
Trejo, Stephen J.
Self-Selection and Internal Migration in the United States
NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-14, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, March 1990.
Also: Final Report, U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1990.
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Endogeneity; Human Capital; Job Skills; Labor Market Demographics; Migration; Mobility; Skills; Socioeconomic Factors; Wage Differentials

Existing research in the internal migration literature focuses on the question of what socioeconomic factors determine the size of the migrant flow. These studies typically use the human capital framework and try to ascertain the empirical importance of migration costs and benefits in determining the individual's probability of experiencing geographic mobility. This research analyzes not only the size and direction of migration flows but also their skill composition. In particular, the authors' main concern is the impact of the endogenous migration decision on the average skills which characterize the self-selected sample of migrants. Using data from the 1979-1986 NLSY, the authors find that: (1) in general, migration rates are higher for workers who are more skilled; and (2) an increase in skills has a larger impact on the migration propensity in states offering small payoffs to skill. The second part of this report examines how the hourly earnings of interstate migrants are affected by the number of years they have spent in their destination state. Results indicate that internal migrants to a state initially earn about ten percent less than demographically comparable natives, but because the earnings growth experienced by recent migrants exceeds that of natives, this wage differential disappears within a few years. The initial wage disadvantage suffered by internal migrants was found to be dependent upon the distance moved and economic conditions in the destination labor market.
Bibliography Citation
Borjas, George J., Stephen G. Bronars and Stephen J. Trejo. "Self-Selection and Internal Migration in the United States." NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-14, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, March 1990.
2. Bradburn, Norman M.
Wojcik, Mark S.
Schoua-Glusberg, A.
Pergamit, Michael R.
Frankel, Martin R.
Ingels, Julia
Hunt, Edwin
Baker, Reginald P.
Two Papers on the Use of Computer-Assisted Personal Interviews in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-2, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington DC, May 1991
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Behavior; Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI); Data Quality/Consistency; Interviewing Method

In discussions of mode effects, the survey methodology literature distinguishes three modes of data collection--face-to-face, telephone and self-administered. There is an extensive literature on possible effects of collecting data by each of these modes because they appear to differ in fundamental ways. What has been less noticed, however, is that there are variations within each of these methods regarding whether or not they are computer-assisted; that is, whether the questionnaire is represented in electronic or paper-and-pencil form. There is a paucity of literature on within-mode effects of using computers to assist in the data collection process. [?] In discussing mode effects, we can distinguish among three types of effects--those that change the interviewer's behavior, those that change the respondent's behavior, and those that change in the interaction between the interviewer and the respondent. The most obvious effects of CAPI are those that change the interviewer's behavior because it is the interviewer that is most affected by a change from PAPI to CAPI. Indeed, it is not immediately obvious that there should be any effect on respondents' behavior because, from their point of view, they are getting the same questionnaire as they would if the interviewer were working with a paper-and-pencil representation. The use of a computer for recording answers, however, may change the way respondents view the task and thus have an impact on their behavior. Finally, reading questions off a computer screen and typing in responses may change the quality of the interaction between interviewer and respondent, for example by reduced eye contact or an increased formality in which the computer becomes a third party to the interview.
Bibliography Citation
Bradburn, Norman M., Mark S. Wojcik, A. Schoua-Glusberg, Michael R. Pergamit, Martin R. Frankel, Julia Ingels, Edwin Hunt and Reginald P. Baker. "Two Papers on the Use of Computer-Assisted Personal Interviews in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-2, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington DC, May 1991.
3. Bureau of Labor Statistics
25 Years of the National Longitudinal Survey - Youth Cohort
Monthly Labor Review [Special Issue] 128,2 (February 2005): . Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 2005.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2005/02/contents.htm
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLS General, NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Children; Longitudinal Data Sets; Longitudinal Surveys

See also the following articles in this bibliography:
Table of Contents:
Charles Pierret: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: 1979 cohort at 25
James R. Walker: Antecedents and predecessors of NLSY79: paving the course
Kenneth I. Wolpin: Education data in the NLSY79: a premiere research tool
Julie A. Yates: The transition from school to work: education and work experiences
Audrey Light: Job mobility and wage growth: evidence from the NLSY79
Robert W. Fairlie: Self-employment, entrepreneurship, and the nlsy79
Harley J. Frazis and James R. Spletzer: Worker training: what we've learned from the nlsy79
Lawrence L. Wu and Jui-Chung Allen Li: Children of the NLSY79: a unique data resource
Randall J. Olsen: The problem of respondent attrition: survey methodology is key
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "25 Years of the National Longitudinal Survey - Youth Cohort." Monthly Labor Review [Special Issue] 128,2 (February 2005): . Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 2005.
4. Bureau of Labor Statistics
America's Young Adults at 29: Labor Market Activity, Education and Partner Status: Results from a Longitudinal Survey
News Release, USDL-16-0700. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, April 8, 2016.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/news.release/nlsyth.nr0.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Educational Attainment; Labor Force Participation; Marital Status

Young adults born in the early 1980s held an average of 7.2 jobs from age 18 through age 28, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Individuals held more jobs at younger ages, and the number of jobs held declined as individuals aged. Young adults held an average of 3.9 jobs from ages 18 to 21 compared with 2.5 jobs from ages 25 to 28. From ages 18 to 28, women with more education held more jobs than women with less education. Regardless of education, men held a similar number of jobs.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "America's Young Adults at 29: Labor Market Activity, Education and Partner Status: Results from a Longitudinal Survey." News Release, USDL-16-0700. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, April 8, 2016.
5. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Number of Jobs Held, Labor Market Activity, and Earnings Growth Over Two Decades: Results from a Longitudinal Survey Summary
News, USDL 00-119. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, 2000.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlsn0004.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Earnings; Job Rewards; Job Turnover; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Surveys; NLS Description; Unemployment; Wage Growth

The average person in the U.S. holds 9.2 jobs from age 18 to age 34, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department ofLabor. More than half of these jobs were held between the ages of 18 and 24. These findings are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), a survey of 9,964 young men and women who were born between 1957 and 1964. These respondents were 14 to 22 years of age when first interviewed in 1979 and 33 to 41 when interviewed most recently in 1998. The survey spans nearly two decades and provides information on work and nonwork experiences, training, schooling, income and assets, health conditions, and other characteristics. The information provided by respondents, who were interviewed annually from 1979 to 1994 and biennially since 1994, can be considered representative of all men and women born in the late 1950s and early 1960s and living in the United States in 1978. Also: http://stats.bls.gov/news.release/nlsoy.nr0.htm
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Number of Jobs Held, Labor Market Activity, and Earnings Growth Over Two Decades: Results from a Longitudinal Survey Summary. News, USDL 00-119. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, 2000..
6. Falaris, Evangelos M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Responses of Female Labor Supply and Fertility to the Demographic Cycle
NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-9, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 1989.
Also: Final Report, U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1989.
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Fertility; First Birth; Labor Supply; Wages; Women

This paper proposes a model according to which women alter the timing of the first birth and the return to work following that birth in order to mitigate any adverse effects of the demographic cycle on their wage profiles. The authors predict that women who were born during the upswing of the demographic cycle would have an incentive to have their first birth earlier and to return to work more quickly (holding schooling constant) than would women who were born during the downswing of the demographic cycle. The empirical evidence confirms these predictions.
Bibliography Citation
Falaris, Evangelos M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Responses of Female Labor Supply and Fertility to the Demographic Cycle." NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-9, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 1989.
7. Mellow, Wesley
Information Deficiencies and Search Unemployment
Working Paper No. 64, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, 1976
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Job Search; Unemployment; Veterans; Wages, Reservation

This paper tests the hypothesis that information deficiencies affect search unemployment by estimating a search unemployment model that explicitly incorporates a measure of initial information deficiencies. Results support the recent job search models, such as McCall's adaptive search model, which hypothesize adjustments in the reservation wage as initial information deficiencies are resolved. Specifically, it appears that information deficiencies affect search unemployment, that search unemployment is productive and that the market differentials of job changers narrow. All this indicates a familiar scenario. The initial perception of the wage distribution is dominated by the prior wage. As search progresses, information is accumulated and in Bayesian fashion the perception of the wage distribution becomes more precise. The reservation wage is adjusted towards the market wage. Unemployment is thus productive in two important ways: (1) it is productive search: it leads to a better (higher wage) new job; and (2) it facilitates equilibration in the labor market: it encourages a realignment of unrealistic perceptions with market realities. Of course, these generalizations must be tempered by a recognition that the results apply only to the behavior of middle aged men in a full employment economy.
Bibliography Citation
Mellow, Wesley. "Information Deficiencies and Search Unemployment." Working Paper No. 64, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, 1976.
8. Schwartz, Saul
Hutchins, Robert
Jakubson, George
Dynamic Models of the Joint Determination of Labor Supply and Family Structure
NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-3, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, June 1991.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/ore/abstract/nl/nl910020.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Family Structure; Labor Supply; Modeling; Simultaneity; Women

This project will construct a dynamic theoretical model of the labor supply and family structure of young women. The authors will then show how the parameters of that theoretical model might be estimated. Essentially, the resulting econometric model is a simultaneous equations model in which the range of possible values for the dependent variables is limited. They may be binary, truncated at zero or censored. In addition, the model may contain lagged dependent variables as explanatory variables. Linear models of this type have been estimated previously. It is anticipated that literature will be extended in order to deal with the nonlinear structure implied by our theoretical model. Once estimation is complete, the models described here will provide knowledge that is of substantial policy relevance. The estimated models will yield new information on the economic consequences of a young woman's decisions regarding labor supply and family structure. Moreover, the models will indicate the extent to which such decisions are sensitive to changes in economic variables such as wage rates and demographic characteristics. Such knowledge can play a fundamental role in the formulation and evaluation of government policy.
Bibliography Citation
Schwartz, Saul, Robert Hutchins and George Jakubson. "Dynamic Models of the Joint Determination of Labor Supply and Family Structure." NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-3, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, June 1991.