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Source: Report
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Brown, Charles
Estimating the Effects of a Youth Differential on Teenagers and Adults
Report of the Minimum Wage Study Commission 5 (1981): 389-427
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Legislation; Minimum Wage; Taxes; Teenagers; Unemployment; Wage Differentials; Wages, Youth

This paper reviews and selectively supplements previous work on the effects of a youth differential. Topics covered include: the effect on demand for teenagers and adults; the effect on teenage labor supply; the effect on human capital accumulation; restrictions typically placed on use of the differential in actual legislative proposals; tax credits and youth differentials.
Bibliography Citation
Brown, Charles. "Estimating the Effects of a Youth Differential on Teenagers and Adults." Report of the Minimum Wage Study Commission 5 (1981): 389-427.
2. Kim, Choongsoo
On the Determinants of Reservation Wages: An Empirical Specification
Columbus, OH, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1981
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Job Search; Life Cycle Research; Unemployment; Wages, Reservation; Work History

Under the assumption that the wage distribution is sufficiently characterized by the first and second moment, this paper develops an empirically tractable model where the above two pieces of information regarding the wage offer distribution play key roles in explaining the formation of reservation wages. The variance of the wage distribution, as a measure of the probability of finding a job, plays a significant role in explaining the formation of the reservation wages among the unemployed. The reservation wages are linearly related with the mean expected wages, and the elasticities are less than unity. The universe of the study includes white and black non- enrolled unemployed males from the l979 NLSY.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Choongsoo. "On the Determinants of Reservation Wages: An Empirical Specification." Columbus, OH, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1981.
3. Kohen, Andrew I.
Attrition from Military and Civilian Jobs: Insights from the National Longitudinal Surveys
Final Report, Columbus OH: Battelle Columbus Laboratories, 1984
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Behavior; Military Service; Mobility, Occupational; Quits

This study uses data from the Young Men and NLSY cohorts to investigate the antecedents of voluntary job separations. The focus is on comparing military and civilian behaviors. For civilians the analysis concentrates on the first regular post-school job, while for the members of the armed forces the concentration is on attrition from the first term of service. Some of the conclusions based on comparing the various empirical findings are: (1) quitting a first civilian job and attriting from an initial term of military service are distinctly different behaviors; (2) military pay level and other objective features of the military context are strongly related to whether a young man completes his first term of service; and (3) many affective traits significantly influence the likelihood of a young man attriting from military service. A few policy suggestions regarding recruitment and training are offered based on the empirical findings.
Bibliography Citation
Kohen, Andrew I. "Attrition from Military and Civilian Jobs: Insights from the National Longitudinal Surveys." Final Report, Columbus OH: Battelle Columbus Laboratories, 1984.
4. Lazear, Edward
Miller, Frederick H.
Minimum Wage versus Minimum Compensation
Report of the Minimum Wage Study Commission 5 (1981): 347-380
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Minimum Wage; NLS of H.S. Class of 1972; Teenagers

The question examined in this paper is whether a minimum wage constraint induces employers to reduce other aspects of compensation. In particular, we examine the relationship between the imposition of a minimum wage and the rate of subsequent wage growth. One possible hypothesis is that the provision of on-the-job training by the employer is reduced as a way to compensate for the increased pecuniary wage rate. We find little support for this hypothesis. Other papers, by Mincer and Leighton, and by Hashimoto, claim to find strong effects of this sort.
Bibliography Citation
Lazear, Edward and Frederick H. Miller. "Minimum Wage versus Minimum Compensation." Report of the Minimum Wage Study Commission 5 (1981): 347-380.
5. Shaw, Lois B.
Gagen, Mary G.
Retirement Decisions of Husbands and Wives
Columbus, OH, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1984
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Early Retirement; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Pensions; Retirement

Using the NLS Older Men's cohort, this paper found congruent retirement statuses for husbands and wives among couples in which the wives were employed or formerly employed. Among retired couples, the majority had retired within five years of each other. When considering the influences on spouses' retirement separately, we found that women who would become eligible for a full pension at a later time were likely to delay their retirement. Husbands' pension eligibility increased wives' retirement, and wives' pension eligibility also increased the likelihood of retirement for husbands before age 62, but had no effect at older ages. Health affected each spouse's own retirement, but cross-effects were generally not significant. When we used a multinomial logit model to examine the factors influencing whether husbands and wives retired together or separately, we found evidence that spouses have a tendency to work or retire together, but that either spouse may retire alone when their pension eligibility or health problems have opposing effects.
Bibliography Citation
Shaw, Lois B. and Mary G. Gagen. "Retirement Decisions of Husbands and Wives." Columbus, OH, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1984.