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Source: International Sociological Association
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Parcel, Toby L.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Effects of Maternal Working Conditions in the First Year of Life on PPVT Among 3-6 Year Old Children: Estimates from Longitudinal Models
Presented: Prague, Czech Republic, Meetings of the International Sociological Association's Research Committee on Social Stratification (RC28), 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: International Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Child Care; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Current arguments suggest that the child's first year is critical, since both maternal employment outside the home/maternal working conditions and non-maternal child care may be detrimental. The authors analyze the effects of maternal/working conditions in the child's first year, the nature of child care arrangements in the first year, and family configuration as they impact PPVT-R for 3-6 year olds of mothers, who have worked at any point in the child's life (N-1107) using data from the NLSY and Child Supplements for 1986 Analyses using LISREL suggest the extent to which such variables in the child's first year impact analogous constructs at the time of assessment, and whether both have independent effects on PPVT-R.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L. and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Effects of Maternal Working Conditions in the First Year of Life on PPVT Among 3-6 Year Old Children: Estimates from Longitudinal Models." Presented: Prague, Czech Republic, Meetings of the International Sociological Association's Research Committee on Social Stratification (RC28), 1991.
2. Parcel, Toby L.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Maternal Working Conditions and Child Verbal Facility: Studying the Transmission of Intergenerational Inequality from Mothers to Young Children [Revised Version]
Presented: Utrecht, The Netherlands, Meetings of the International Sociological Association's Research Committee on Social Stratification (RC28), April 1989
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: International Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Affirmative Action; Child Care; Child Development; Children, Academic Development; Children, Home Environment; General Assessment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Temperament; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L. and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Maternal Working Conditions and Child Verbal Facility: Studying the Transmission of Intergenerational Inequality from Mothers to Young Children [Revised Version]." Presented: Utrecht, The Netherlands, Meetings of the International Sociological Association's Research Committee on Social Stratification (RC28), April 1989.
3. Parcel, Toby L.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Parental Work, Family Social Capital, and Early Childhood Outcomes
Presented: Prague, Czech Republic, Meetings of the International Sociological Association's Research Committee on Social Stratification (RC28), 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: International Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Development; Children; Children, Academic Development; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Current arguments suggest that the child's first year is critical, since both maternal employment outside the home, maternal working conditions and non-maternal child care may be detrimental. The authors analyze the effects of maternal and paternal working conditions in the child's first year, the nature of child care arrangements, and family configuration--in the first year of life and at the time of assessment--on PPVT-R for 3-6-year-olds of mothers who worked at the time of assessment (N=795) using data from the NLSY and the Child Supplement for 1986. It was found that maternal wages in 1986 and paternal wages in the first year positively impact PPVT-R, and that both maternal and paternal work hours in 1986 have a curvilinear relationship with PPVT-R: overtime hours are detrimental while fathers' full-time work and mothers' high part-time hours are advantageous. The child's home environment and several maternal and child background characteristics also impact PPVT-R.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L. and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Parental Work, Family Social Capital, and Early Childhood Outcomes." Presented: Prague, Czech Republic, Meetings of the International Sociological Association's Research Committee on Social Stratification (RC28), 1991.
4. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Life Course Stratification and Adult Health in the U.S.: The Contribution of Health Insurance to Socioeconomic Inequities in Health
Presented: New York, NY, Research Committee 28 on Social Stratification and Mobility of the International Sociological Association Meeting, August 2003.
Also: http://education.nyu.edu/humsocsci/rc28/Quesnel-Vallee.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Medicaid/Medicare; Modeling, Fixed Effects

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using prospective cohort data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and relying on a life course stratification framework, this study will determine the extent to which health insurance coverage contributes to socioeconomic differentials in adult health.

While previous research has shown that nonelderly privately insured individuals enjoy better health outcomes than their uninsured counterparts, the same relationship does not hold for those publicly insured through programs such as Medicaid. Because it is unclear whether this finding reflects a true causal relationship or is in fact due to selection bias on socioeconomic status (SES) and health, previous estimates of the contribution of health insurance to inequities in health may have been biased.

This study attempts to disentangle these competing hypotheses by using fixed effects models with sibling clusters to corroborate -- or refute -- the results of a conventional OLS regression. By controlling for unobserved factors shared by siblings such as parental genetic influences, sibling models estimate health insurance effects that are less affected by selection bias.

Findings suggest that the negative relationship between public health insurance and health is not causal, but rather due to prior health and SES. Conversely, health insurance coverage per se (though not the source of coverage) contributes to socioeconomic differentials in health.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie. "Life Course Stratification and Adult Health in the U.S.: The Contribution of Health Insurance to Socioeconomic Inequities in Health." Presented: New York, NY, Research Committee 28 on Social Stratification and Mobility of the International Sociological Association Meeting, August 2003.
5. Stinner, William F.
Transition to Retirement and Migration Behavior in the United States
Presented: New Delhi, India, Meetings of the International Sociological Association, 1986
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: International Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior; Family Resources; Life Course; Life Cycle Research; Migration; Retirement; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Migration is often presumed to be linked to major transitions occurring throughout the life course. In postindustrial societies, one such prominent transition is retirement. Since little is known about the factors constraining or facilitating migration behavior in the context of the retirement transition, a model developed around a set of conditioning factors, including personal resources, socioeconomic bonds, environmental setting, and age, is tested on a sample of 2,000 United States males who entered retirement between 1967 and 1983.
Bibliography Citation
Stinner, William F. "Transition to Retirement and Migration Behavior in the United States." Presented: New Delhi, India, Meetings of the International Sociological Association, 1986.
6. Stinner, William F.
Byun, Yongchan
Transition to Retirement and Geographic Mobility
Presented: Madrid, Spain, International Sociological Association, 1990
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: International Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Migration; Mobility; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Contributing to the literature on retirement timing and geographical mobility, data from the NLS of Older Men in the US are used to analyze the sequencing of retirement and geographical mobility among a subsample of 937 white men who had reached age 59 between 1966 and 1973, were still in the labor force in wage and salary employment, and were married. The subjects were followed for 10 years to examine the degree to which their retirement-moving patterns were affected by a selected set of individual, occupational, and environmental characteristics. Intervals were pooled (N = 2,829) and a discrete event-history analysis was conducted. Variations in effects were evident, dependent on type of sequencing and across type of mobility, i.e., local move, any migration, and interstate migration. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc.]
Bibliography Citation
Stinner, William F. and Yongchan Byun. "Transition to Retirement and Geographic Mobility." Presented: Madrid, Spain, International Sociological Association, 1990.