Search Results

Author: Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Resulting in 13 citations.
1. DiPrete, Thomas A.
Maurin, Eric
Goux, Dominique
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Work and Pay in Flexible and Regulated Labor Markets: A Generalized Perspective on Institutional Evolution and Inequality Trends in Europe and the U.S.
Presented: San Francisco CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2004
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Cross-national Analysis; France/Formation et Qualification Professionnelle (FQP) Survey; Labor Market Studies, Geographic; Layoffs; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In recent years a “unified theory” has emerged out of labor economics, which argues that a combination of “macroeconomic shocks” and flexible labor market institutions in the U.S. has produced strong upward trends in wage inequality, while these same shocks have produced high unemployment and low employment growth in Europe as a side effect of the wage stability preserved by that continent’s rigid labor market institutions. This paper argues instead that European institutions in fact have evolved their own form of flexibility, which, in combination with the macroeconomic shocks described in the unified theory, have also led to rising inequality in Europe, but of a different form. Inequality of employment security has risen faster in France than in the U.S. Furthermore, trends in the French labor market have led to increased concentration of low-skill workers in these insecure job statues. These results challenge the view that unemployment is the main mechanisms through which European labor markets absorbed asymmetric shocks to their demand for labor. They also challenge the view that Europeans have intolerance for inequality, but instead suggest that the main difference between the two sides of the Atlantic concerns the nature of the inequalities that each society is willing to tolerate.
Bibliography Citation
DiPrete, Thomas A., Eric Maurin, Dominique Goux and Amélie Quesnel-Vallée. "Work and Pay in Flexible and Regulated Labor Markets: A Generalized Perspective on Institutional Evolution and Inequality Trends in Europe and the U.S." Presented: San Francisco CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2004.
2. Maximova, Katerina
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Mental Health Consequences of Unintended Childlessness and Unplanned Births: Gender Differences and Life Course Dynamics
Social Science and Medicine 68,5 (March 2009): 850-857.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953608005789
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Fertility; Gender Differences; Life Course; Wantedness

The discordance between fertility intentions and outcomes may be associated with mental health in the general population. This requires data directly linking individuals' fertility intentions with their outcomes. This study brings together two streams of research on fertility and psychological distress to examine whether unintended childlessness and unplanned births are associated with psychological distress, compared with intended childlessness and planned births. We also examine whether unintended childlessness and unplanned births are differently associated with distress at two stages of the individuals' life course: in early and late 30s. As women are more directly affected by the decline in fertility with age and the experience of motherhood is more central to women's identity, we also examined gender differences in these associations. Thus, we examined the association between four possible fertility events (planned and unplanned births, intended and unintended childlessness) and psychological distress of men and women, at two different stages over the life course (early and late 30s). We used longitudinal data from the US National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979 (N = 2524) to link individuals' fertility intentions and outcomes to evaluate the association of depressive symptoms (CES-D) with four possible fertility events occurring in two-year intervals, for men and women separately. Contrary to our first hypothesis, unintended childlessness and unplanned births were not associated with psychological distress for women. Among men, only unplanned births in their early 30s were associated with increases in psychological distress. We did not find support for our second hypothesis that unintended childlessness and unplanned births have a different association with psychological distress for men and women and as a function of the stage of life. These findings are discussed in the context of previous literature in this area.
Bibliography Citation
Maximova, Katerina and Amélie Quesnel-Vallée. "Mental Health Consequences of Unintended Childlessness and Unplanned Births: Gender Differences and Life Course Dynamics." Social Science and Medicine 68,5 (March 2009): 850-857.
3. Morgan, S. Philip
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Life Course Dynamics of Unintended and Mistimed Pregnancies Among American Women
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 12, 2005.
Also: http://www.allacademic.com//meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/0/2/0/9/8/pages20988/p20988-1.php
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Fertility; Life Course; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study relies on longitudinal, prospective assessments of fertility intentions and behaviors of 1957 to 1961 birth cohorts of U.S. women to evaluate the correspondence between pregnancies explicitly reported as unwanted or mistimed, and those associated with changing intentions. We first assess the contribution of unwanted and mistimed pregnancies to the observed fertility of these cohorts of women, and then examine the dynamic contribution of life course factors to changing intentions. We build on a framework developed by Bongaarts (2001) in selecting the life course factors that merit attention in this regard.

Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a nationally representative survey which prospectively follows the parallel evolution of fertility intentions and reproductive histories. To ensure that the analyses reach the near end of the respondents' reproductive years, the sample is restricted to 2,720 women 40 years or older in 2002 (vital registration statistics indicate that only 1-2% of the U.S. TFR is due to women above 40).

Bibliography Citation
Morgan, S. Philip and Amélie Quesnel-Vallée. "Life Course Dynamics of Unintended and Mistimed Pregnancies Among American Women." Presented: Philadelphia, PA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 12, 2005.
4. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Does Health Insurance Coverage Mitigate or Exacerbate Socioeconomic Inequities in Health in the U.S.?
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Health Factors; Insurance, Health; Modeling; Siblings; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the institutional impact of health insurance coverage on the pathways leading from status attainment to adult health. Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the analyzes consist of structural equation models of sibling resemblance (Hauser 1988). Results suggest that the cumulative effects of income are partially mediated by the effects of health insurance. More specifically, these analyzes indicate that health insurance and the source of coverage contribute to social inequities in health through very different pathways: first, the number of years privately insured was found to compound the positive sibling-specific effects of status attainment on health when contrasted with the lack of insurance; second, public insurance was not found to differ in its effects on health from private insurance; and third, public insurance may have the potential to reduce socioeconomic inequities from the family of origin when lack of insurance is the alternative.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie. "Does Health Insurance Coverage Mitigate or Exacerbate Socioeconomic Inequities in Health in the U.S.?" Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2005.
5. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Early Socioeconomic Disadvantage and the Cumulative Impact of Socioeconomic Status over the Life Course on Adult Health
Presented: Boston, MA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2004.
Also: http://www.allacademic.com//meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/1/0/9/4/0/pages109409/p109409-1.php
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Family Resources; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Life Course; Mobility; Socioeconomic Background; Socioeconomic Factors; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While much research has confirmed the association between adult SES and adult health, still little is known about the impact of SES trajectories on adult health. SES is hypothesized to affect health over the life course primarily through its cumulative effects on health, regardless of when adversity is experienced in the life course. In addition to those cumulative effects, it has been argued that the experience of adverse socioeconomic conditions in critical periods, such as early in the life course, may be even more detrimental to adult health than later disadvantage. In addition, there has also been recent speculation as to the effect of intragenerational mobility trajectories on health. Using data from the NLSY79, this study will examine (1) the cumulative impact of financial resources, (2) the differential impact of those resources at different periods in the respondents' life courses, and (3), the impact of intragenerational mobility trajectories in early and mid-adulthood. In addition, the main and moderating effects of early disadvantage on these relationships will be assessed. Findings suggest that financial resources do have cumulative effects on health through early and mid-adulthood. In addition, while there appeared to be critical period effects when respondents were in their late twenties, there were no critical period effects of poverty in the early twenties, nor were there discernable mobility effects.

SES is hypothesized to affect health over the life course in two ways. First, SES is thought to have cumulative effects on health, regardless of when adversity is experienced in the life course. In addition to those cumulative effects, it is argued that the experience of adverse socioeconomic conditions early in the life course is more detrimental to adult health than later disadvantage, since it is reflected in lower education opportunities, which in turn restrict achieved status and health in adulthood. Using data from the NLSY79, this study will therefore examine both the cumulative impact of life course socioeconomic status to health as well as the moderating contribution of early socioeconomic status at different life stages to this relationship. Findings suggest that SES does have cumulative effects on health through the life course and that individuals who experienced poverty in late adolescence have a higher return to employment.

Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie. "Early Socioeconomic Disadvantage and the Cumulative Impact of Socioeconomic Status over the Life Course on Adult Health." Presented: Boston, MA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2004.
6. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Is it Really Worse to Have Public Health Insurance Than to Have No Insurance at All? Health Insurance and Adult Health in the United States
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 45,4 (December 2004): 376-392.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/45/4/376.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Health Care; Health Reform; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Medicaid/Medicare; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using prospective cohort data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study examines the extent to which health insurance coverage and the source of that coverage affect adult health. While previous research has shown that privately insure nonelderly individuals enjoy better health outcomes than their uninsured counterparts, the same relationship does not hold for those publicly insured through programs such as Medicaid. Because it is unclear whether this finding reflects a true causal relationship or is in fact due to selection bias by using fixed effects models with sibling clusters to corroborate--or contradict--the results of a conventional OLS regression. By controlling for unobserved factors shared by siblings, such as parental genetic influences, sibling models estimate health insurance effects that are less affected by selection bias. Findings suggest that, among the US birth cohorts of 1957 to 1961, the negative relationship between public health insurance and health is not causal, but rather due to prior health and socioeconomic status. Conversely, the lack of health insurance coverage has a strong cumulative negative impact on adult health.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie. "Is it Really Worse to Have Public Health Insurance Than to Have No Insurance at All? Health Insurance and Adult Health in the United States." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 45,4 (December 2004): 376-392.
7. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Life Course Stratification and Adult Health in the U.S.: The Contribution of Health Insurance to Socioeconomic Inequities in Health
Presented: New York, NY, Research Committee 28 on Social Stratification and Mobility of the International Sociological Association Meeting, August 2003.
Also: http://education.nyu.edu/humsocsci/rc28/Quesnel-Vallee.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Medicaid/Medicare; Modeling, Fixed Effects

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using prospective cohort data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and relying on a life course stratification framework, this study will determine the extent to which health insurance coverage contributes to socioeconomic differentials in adult health.

While previous research has shown that nonelderly privately insured individuals enjoy better health outcomes than their uninsured counterparts, the same relationship does not hold for those publicly insured through programs such as Medicaid. Because it is unclear whether this finding reflects a true causal relationship or is in fact due to selection bias on socioeconomic status (SES) and health, previous estimates of the contribution of health insurance to inequities in health may have been biased.

This study attempts to disentangle these competing hypotheses by using fixed effects models with sibling clusters to corroborate -- or refute -- the results of a conventional OLS regression. By controlling for unobserved factors shared by siblings such as parental genetic influences, sibling models estimate health insurance effects that are less affected by selection bias.

Findings suggest that the negative relationship between public health insurance and health is not causal, but rather due to prior health and SES. Conversely, health insurance coverage per se (though not the source of coverage) contributes to socioeconomic differentials in health.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie. "Life Course Stratification and Adult Health in the U.S.: The Contribution of Health Insurance to Socioeconomic Inequities in Health." Presented: New York, NY, Research Committee 28 on Social Stratification and Mobility of the International Sociological Association Meeting, August 2003.
8. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Dehaney, Suzanne
Ciampi, Antonio
Contingent Work and Depressive Symptoms: Contribution of Health Selection and Moderating Effects of Employment Status
Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Sociological Association's 104th Annual Meeting, August 9, 2009.
Also: http://www.soc.cas.cz/download/476/Am%E9lie%20Quesnel-Vall%E9e_Contingent_work_and_depressive_symptoms.ppt
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Employment, Part-Time; Health, Mental; Labor Supply; Work, Atypical; Work, Contingent

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

For a complete resume of the paper, see, COOPER, JACKIE: Employee Mental Health Strained By Temp Work Medical New Today 12 Aug 2009. Also: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/160396.php
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie, Suzanne Dehaney and Antonio Ciampi. "Contingent Work and Depressive Symptoms: Contribution of Health Selection and Moderating Effects of Employment Status." Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Sociological Association's 104th Annual Meeting, August 9, 2009.
9. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Dehaney, Suzanne
Ciampi, Antonio
Temporary Work and Depressive Symptoms: A Propensity Score Analysis
Social Science and Medicine 70,12 (June 2010):1982-1987.
Also: http://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/socmed/v70y2010i12p1982-1987.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Job Characteristics; Modeling; Part-Time Work; Propensity Scores; Shift Workers; Work Hours; Work, Atypical

Recent decades have seen a tremendous increase in the complexity of work arrangements, through job sharing, flexible hours, career breaks, compressed work weeks, shift work, reduced job security, and part-time, contract and temporary work. In this study, we focus on one specific group of workers that arguably most embodies non-standard employment, namely temporary workers, and estimate the effect of this type of employment on depressive symptom severity. Accounting for the possibility of mental health selection into temporary work through propensity score analysis, we isolate the direct effects of temporary work on depressive symptoms with varying lags of time since exposure. We use prospective data from the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), which has followed, longitudinally, from 1979 to the present, a nationally representative cohort of American men and women between 14 and 22 years of age in 1979. Three propensity score models were estimated, to capture the effect of different time lags (immediately following exposure, and 2 and 4 years post exposure) between the period of exposure to the outcome. The only significant effects were found among those who had been exposed to temporary work in the two years preceding the outcome measurement. These workers report 1.803 additional depressive symptoms from having experienced this work status (than if they had not been exposed). Moreover, this difference is both statistically and substantively significant, as it represents a 50% increase from the average level of depressive symptoms in this population. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie, Suzanne Dehaney and Antonio Ciampi. "Temporary Work and Depressive Symptoms: A Propensity Score Analysis." Social Science and Medicine 70,12 (June 2010):1982-1987.
10. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Morgan, S. Philip
Missing the Target? Correspondence of Fertility Intentions and Behavior in the U.S.
Population Research and Policy Review 22,5-6 (December 2003): 497-525.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/q45281251445l40g/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Birth Rate; Expectations/Intentions; Family Size; Fertility; Life Course

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Building on a framework suggested by Bongaarts (2001) and using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we describe the correspondence between intended family size and observed fertility for the 1957 to 1961 birth cohorts of U.S. women and men. Over an 18-year period (1982-2000), we show that while aggregate intentions are quite stable, discrepancies are very common at the individual level. Women and men were more likely to err in predicting number of additional births in the period 1982-2000 than to hit their target number. A very strong predictor of over- and underachieving fertility is initial intended parity. Those who intended more than two children tended to have fewer children than intended, while those who intended fewer than two children tended to have more children than intended. In addition and consistent with life course arguments, those unmarried in 1982, childless in 1982, and (for women) still in school in 1982 were most likely to underachieve their 2000 intended parity (i.e., have fewer children than intended). We conclude by reflecting on how the circumstances that allow discrepancies between intentions and behavior to almost "balance" in the U.S. may cumulate differently elsewhere to produce much lower fertility.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie and S. Philip Morgan. "Missing the Target? Correspondence of Fertility Intentions and Behavior in the U.S." Population Research and Policy Review 22,5-6 (December 2003): 497-525.
11. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Renahy, Emilie
Pregnancy: A Risk Factor for Social Inequalities in Overweight and Obesity?
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Obesity; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We aimed to: 1. Estimate the average time to return to pre-pregnancy and “healthy” BMI (18.5-24.9) post-pregnancy. 2. Identify socioeconomic and ethnic characteristics placing women at risk of not returning to a healthy and/or their pre-pregnancy BMI. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 for 1890 parous women, we find that 68.6% of women returned to their pre-pregnancy BMI after 1.9 years on average. Similarly, 81.2% reached a healthy BMI after 1.7 years on average. However, given that 18.8% of women who returned to their pre-pregnancy BMI were overweight or obese, this suggests that the high proportion of women reaching a “healthy” BMI post-partum is due in part to underweight women transitioning into this “healthy” category. Moreover, higher proportions of women returned to their pre-pregnancy BMI among Whites (70.0%) than Blacks (62.1%) or Hispanics (57.4%) and among those whose mothers' had higher education.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie and Emilie Renahy. "Pregnancy: A Risk Factor for Social Inequalities in Overweight and Obesity?" Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
12. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Taylor, Miles G.
Socioeconomic Pathways to Depressive Symptoms in Adulthood: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979
Social Science and Medicine 74,5 (March 2012): 734-743.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22300713
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Education; Family Income; Health, Mental; Life Course; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Parental Influences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

The existence of a direct effect of early socioeconomic position (SEP) on adult mental health outcomes net of adult SEP is still debated. This question demands the explicit modeling of pathways linking early SEP to adult SEP and mental health. In light of this background, we pursue two objectives in this study. First, we examine whether depressive symptoms in adulthood can be fit in a trajectory featuring both an intercept, or baseline range of depressive symptoms that varied between individuals, and a slope describing the average evolution of depressive symptoms over the years. Second, we estimate the direct and indirect pathways linking early SEP, respondents’ education and adult household income, with a particular focus on whether early SEP retains a significant direct effect on the trajectory of depressive symptoms once adult SEP is entered into the pathway model. Drawing from 29 years of cohort data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a survey that has been following a national probability sample of American civilian and military youth (Zagorsky and White, 1999), we used structural equation models to estimate the pathways between parents’ education, respondent’s education, and latent growth curves of household income and depressive symptoms. We found that the effect of parents’ education was entirely mediated by respondent’s education. In turn, the effect of respondent’s education was largely mediated by household income. In conclusion, our findings showed that the socioeconomic attainment process that is rooted in parents’ education and leads to respondent’s education and then to household income is a crucial pathway for adult mental health. These results suggest that increasing educational opportunities may be an effective policy to break the intergenerational transmission of low socioeconomic status and poor mental health.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie and Miles G. Taylor. "Socioeconomic Pathways to Depressive Symptoms in Adulthood: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979." Social Science and Medicine 74,5 (March 2012): 734-743.
13. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Taylor, Miles G.
Park, Alison
Pathways from Parental Education to Adult Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms
Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Education; Fathers, Influence; Growth Curves; Health, Mental; Income; Mothers, Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using latent growth curves, we decompose the effects of parental education on trajectories of depressive symptoms (DS) in adulthood into direct and indirect effects mediated by respondents' education and trajectories of income in adulthood. Data come from the NLSY79 (N=5,247). Mother's, but not father's, education had a direct effect on the intercept of DS, as each year of maternal education decreased the intercept of DS by 0.10 points (p<0.001). This direct effect declined in both significance (p<0.05) and by 50% in magnitude with the indirect effect through respondents' own education. Finally, the totality of the effect appeared to be indirect when trajectories of income were included. Thus, childhood appears to be a period sensitive to the effects of parents' education, but this effect wanes as individuals progress through the life course and more proximate effects of achieved status (education and income) take precedence.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie, Miles G. Taylor and Alison Park. "Pathways from Parental Education to Adult Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms." Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010.