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Author: Egge, Karl Albert
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Egge, Karl Albert
Black-White Differences in Annual Hours of Work Supplied Among Males 45-59 Years of Age
Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1973. DAI-A 34/05, p. 2116, Nov 1973
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Local Labor Market; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Unemployment; Wages

A number of factors are examined that are expected to be related to the amount of labor an individual supplies. The data indicate that for both blacks and whites the amount of labor supplied, generally speaking, is inversely related to: (1) hourly wage rate; (2) level of non-labor income; (3) age; (4) local area unemployment rate; and (5) the presence of recent unemployment experience. It is directly related, on the other hand, to: (6) being married (spouse present); (7) being healthy; and (8) being in white collar jobs. Moreover, the relationship between each of the eight "explanatory" factors and hours supplied is different for blacks than for whites. For example, the effect of hourly wage rate on hours is much larger for blacks, while the effect of personal unemployment experience is actually the opposite for blacks from what it is for whites. Combining the mean of each of these factors with their estimated effects on hours supplied, the author is able to shed some light on the sources of the gross white-black difference in hours supplied by ascertaining which factors tend to widen and which ones to lower the observed differences. Generally speaking, it was found that wages, age, and personal unemployment experience tend to widen the white-black difference in hours supplied, while local labor market unemployment, net income per dependent, and marital status tend to narrow the differences. On the basis of these findings, Egge suggests that as wages continue to rise over time, and as these men get older, the black-white difference in hours supplied will widen.
Bibliography Citation
Egge, Karl Albert. Black-White Differences in Annual Hours of Work Supplied Among Males 45-59 Years of Age. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1973. DAI-A 34/05, p. 2116, Nov 1973.
2. Egge, Karl Albert
Black-White Differences in Annual Hours of Work Supplied Among Males 45-59 Years of Age: A Progress Report
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1971
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Racial Differences; Wages; Work Hours

This first stage of investigation of racial differences in the amount of labor supplied by middle-aged men attempts to explain why white men 45 to 59 years old supplied about 200 more hours of work during 1965 than black men in the same age category. The investigation is confined to individuals whose current or last job was a wage or salary worker.
Bibliography Citation
Egge, Karl Albert. "Black-White Differences in Annual Hours of Work Supplied Among Males 45-59 Years of Age: A Progress Report." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1971.
3. Egge, Karl Albert
Kohen, Andrew I.
Shea, John R.
Zeller, Frederick A.
Changes in the Federal Minimum Wage and the Employment of Young Men, 1966-67
In: Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages: Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 1657. Washington, DC: U.S. GPO, 1970
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Minimum Wage; Teenagers; Unemployment, Youth

These data permit the "before and after" experience of youth to be related to the wage they were earning before the new minimum became effective. The authors ask whether those youth whose marginal productivity was lower than the newly established minimum had relatively less favorable employment experiences after the minimum wage changes than those whose wages already had been above the minimums. One would expect these low productivity youngsters to be among the first to feel whatever restriction of employment opportunities the minimum wage created. The fact that the authors have been unable to find in their data any general tendency for the foregoing relationship leads to the conclusion that if the minimum wage increases did indeed create unemployment among youth, the effect was not a pronounced one. Even when the analysis was focused on these subgroups of young men who might, on a priori grounds, be expected to be most vulnerable to the impact of the minimum wage, only a small number of such subgroups showed any signs of adversity.
Bibliography Citation
Egge, Karl Albert, Andrew I. Kohen, John R. Shea and Frederick A. Zeller. "Changes in the Federal Minimum Wage and the Employment of Young Men, 1966-67" In: Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages: Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 1657. Washington, DC: U.S. GPO, 1970
4. Parnes, Herbert S.
Egge, Karl Albert
Kohen, Andrew I.
Schmidt, Ronald M.
Pre-Retirement Years, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of the Labor Market Experience of Men
Manpower Research Monograph 15, Volume 2. Washington DC: US GPO, 1970
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Employment; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Household Income; Mobility, Interfirm; Mobility, Job; Work Attitudes

Data from the first and second interviews of men who were age 45-59 years in mid-1966 are used in this progress report on the longitudinal study to describe the magnitude and the patterns of change that have occurred during the one-year period in the labor market status of members of the sample and in certain other characteristics that have an important effect on labor market activity.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., Karl Albert Egge, Andrew I. Kohen and Ronald M. Schmidt. Pre-Retirement Years, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of the Labor Market Experience of Men. Manpower Research Monograph 15, Volume 2. Washington DC: US GPO, 1970.