Search Results

Author: Rendall, Michael S.
Resulting in 10 citations.
1. Eeckhaut, Mieke C. W.
Rendall, Michael S.
Zvavitch, Polina
Do LARCs Increase Subsequent Intended Fertility?
Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Contraception; Expectations/Intentions; Fertility; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods have been promoted as an effective means of protection against unintended pregnancy and for increasing the proportion of pregnancies that are intended. An implication we address in the present study is the extent to which women who have been using a LARC go on to have an intended birth after LARC discontinuation. We use two nationally representative studies, the NSFG and NLSY97 to investigate the likelihood that a woman will give birth in the years shortly after discontinuing LARC, and the circumstances associated with pregnancy intendedness such as marital and partnership status around the birth. Using the NSFG, we estimate the proportion of births following LARC discontinuation that are from an intended pregnancy. Finally, we combine the results from these models to develop an estimate of the intended birth rate following LARC discontinuation. We find strong evidence that women use LARC to better time their first or next birth, and not only to reduce the likelihood of an unintended birth. Approximately one-third of women who discontinue LARC use will begin a pregnancy that will result in a live birth within three years of discontinuation. About four-in-five of these pregnancies are intended, implying a considerably lower fraction of unintended births than all U.S. births.
Bibliography Citation
Eeckhaut, Mieke C. W., Michael S. Rendall and Polina Zvavitch. "Do LARCs Increase Subsequent Intended Fertility?" Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2019.
2. Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Hynes, Kathryn
Sikora, Asia
Taber, Jamie Rubenstein
Rendall, Michael S.
The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys
Demography 49,1 (February 2012): 101-124.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/n52u383172070883/
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Data Quality/Consistency; Fathers; Fathers, Biological; Fertility; Methods/Methodology; Monte Carlo; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Researchers continue to question fathers’ willingness to report their biological children in surveys and the ability of surveys to adequately represent fathers. To address these concerns, this study evaluates the quality of men’s fertility data in the 1979 and 1997 cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97) and in the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). Comparing fertility rates in each survey with population rates based on data from Vital Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau, we document how the incomplete reporting of births in different surveys varies according to men’s characteristics, including their age, race, marital status, and birth cohort. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations based on the NSFG data to demonstrate how birth underreporting biases associations between early parenthood and its antecedents. We find that in the NSFG, roughly four out of five early births were reported; but in the NLSY79 and NLSY97, almost nine-tenths of early births were reported. In all three surveys, incomplete reporting was especially pronounced for nonmarital births. Our results suggest that the quality of male fertility data is strongly linked to survey design and that it has implications for models of early male fertility.
Bibliography Citation
Joyner, Kara, H. Elizabeth Peters, Kathryn Hynes, Asia Sikora, Jamie Rubenstein Taber and Michael S. Rendall. "The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys ." Demography 49,1 (February 2012): 101-124.
3. Rendall, Michael S.
Ghosh-Dastidar, Bonnie
Weden, Margaret M.
Nazarov, Zafar
Socio-Demographic Differentials in Experiencing a Major Occupational Injury in the Prime Working Ages: Estimation Using Within-Survey and Cross-Survey Multiple Imputation of Injury Histories
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Accidents; Injuries, Workplace; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Sociodemographic differentials in ever experiencing a major workplace injury in the prime working ages (25 to 44) are estimated from left- and right-censored injury histories in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), and the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). Because the injury hazard is higher for individuals with previous injuries, the age-specific hazard for those with no previous injury since age 25 must first be estimated. Injury histories from age 25, however, are available for a fraction of the NLSY sample and for none in the SIPP sample (only the most recent injury is recorded). For unbiased incorporation of all NLSY and SIPP observations, injury histories are first multiply imputed within the NLSY from non-left-censored histories. Injury histories are then multiply imputed from this “completed” NLSY dataset to every SIPP individual. Efficiency and bias of NLSY-only and NLSY-SIPP estimation are compared to estimation that ignores injury history.
Bibliography Citation
Rendall, Michael S., Bonnie Ghosh-Dastidar, Margaret M. Weden and Zafar Nazarov. "Socio-Demographic Differentials in Experiencing a Major Occupational Injury in the Prime Working Ages: Estimation Using Within-Survey and Cross-Survey Multiple Imputation of Injury Histories." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
4. Rendall, Michael S.
Weden, Margaret M.
Lau, Christopher
Brownell, Peter B.
Nazarov, Zafar
Fernandes, Meenakshi
Evaluation of Bias in Estimates of Early Childhood Obesity From Parent-Reported Heights and Weights
American Journal of Public Health 104,7 (July 2014): 1255-1262.
Also: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.2014.302001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Data Quality/Consistency; Height; Obesity; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: We evaluated bias in estimated obesity prevalence owing to error in parental reporting. We also evaluated bias mitigation through application of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s biologically implausible value (BIV) cutoffs.

Methods: We simulated obesity prevalence of children aged 2 to 5 years in 2 panel surveys after counterfactually substituting parameters estimated from 1999-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data for prevalence of extreme height and weight and for proportions obese in extreme height or weight categories.

Results: Heights reported below the first and fifth height-for-age percentiles explained between one half and two thirds, respectively, of total bias in obesity prevalence. Bias was reduced by one tenth when excluding cases with height-for-age and weight-for-age BIVs and by one fifth when excluding cases with body mass–index-for-age BIVs. Applying BIVs, however, resulted in incorrect exclusion of nonnegligible proportions of obese children.

Conclusions: Correcting the reporting of children's heights in the first percentile alone may reduce overestimation of early childhood obesity prevalence in surveys with parental reporting by one half to two thirds. Excluding BIVs has limited effectiveness in mitigating this bias.

Bibliography Citation
Rendall, Michael S., Margaret M. Weden, Christopher Lau, Peter B. Brownell, Zafar Nazarov and Meenakshi Fernandes. "Evaluation of Bias in Estimates of Early Childhood Obesity From Parent-Reported Heights and Weights." American Journal of Public Health 104,7 (July 2014): 1255-1262.
5. Shattuck, Rachel
Rendall, Michael S.
Retrospective Reporting of First Employment in the Life-courses of U.S. Women
Sociological Methodology 47,1 (August 2017): 307-344.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abstract/10.1177/0081175017723397
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Comparison Group (Reference group); Data Quality/Consistency; Employment, History; Life Course; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The authors investigate the accuracy of young women's retrospective reporting on their first substantial employment in three major, nationally representative U.S. surveys, examining hypotheses that longer recall duration, employment histories with lower salience and higher complexity, and an absence of "anchoring" biographical details will adversely affect reporting accuracy. The authors compare retrospective reports to benchmark panel survey estimates for the same cohorts. Sociodemographic groups--notably non-Hispanic white women and women with college-educated mothers--whose early employment histories at these ages are in aggregate more complex (multiple jobs) and lower in salience (more part-time jobs) are more likely to omit the occurrence of their first substantial job or employment and to misreport their first job or employment as occurring at an older age. Also, retrospective reports are skewed toward overreporting longer, therefore more salient, later jobs over shorter, earlier jobs. The relatively small magnitudes of differences, however, indicate that the retrospective questions nevertheless capture these summary indicators of first substantial employment reasonably accurately. Moreover, these differences are especially small for groups of women who are more likely to experience labor-market disadvantage and for women with early births.
Bibliography Citation
Shattuck, Rachel and Michael S. Rendall. "Retrospective Reporting of First Employment in the Life-courses of U.S. Women." Sociological Methodology 47,1 (August 2017): 307-344.
6. Shattuck, Rachel
Rendall, Michael S.
Retrospective Versus Panel Reports of First Employment in the Life Courses of U.S. Women
Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Employment, History; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Research Methodology; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigates accuracy of reporting on young women's first employment, comparing retrospective reports in the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) and the first wave of the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income Program Participation (SIPP) to annual panel reports in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97). We evaluate differences in recall accuracy by time elapsed between period reported on and interview. We also evaluate differences in reporting accuracy by race/ethnicity, nativity and mother's education, juxtaposed with the salience and complexity of each group's employment histories. We find relatively small, but statistically-significant differences between reporting in the SIPP and NSFG versus the NLSY97, in a direction that suggests some forgetting of episodes of first job or employment spell of at least six months duration in retrospective reports. We also find some evidence that more complex and less salient (part-time) employment experiences result in more recall errors: Young women with a mother who did not graduate from high school and young women with a college-graduate mother had both the highest proportions of their early employment in part-time jobs and the largest magnitudes of error in recalling first stable job or employment spell. We found no indications of substantial race/ethnic differences in reporting. Overall, our results are reassuring with respect to the ability of surveys to capture accurately summary indicators of first stable employment in retrospective questions.
Bibliography Citation
Shattuck, Rachel and Michael S. Rendall. "Retrospective Versus Panel Reports of First Employment in the Life Courses of U.S. Women." Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015.
7. Weden, Margaret M.
Brownell, Peter B.
Rendall, Michael S.
Prenatal, Perinatal, Early Life, and Sociodemographic Factors Underlying Racial Differences in the Likelihood of High Body Mass Index in Early Childhood
American Journal of Public Health 102,11 (November 2012): 2057-2067.
Also: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300686
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Breastfeeding; Child Care; Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B, ECLS-K); Obesity; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Racial Differences; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives. We investigated early childhood disparities in high body mass index (BMI) between Black and White US children.

Methods. We compared differences in Black and White children’s prevalence of sociodemographic, prenatal, perinatal, and early life risk and protective factors; fit logistic regression models predicting high BMI (≥ 95th percentile) at age 4 to 5 years to 2 nationally representative samples followed from birth; and performed separate and pooled-survey estimations of these models.

Results. After adjustment for sample design–related variables, models predicting high BMI in the 2 samples were statistically indistinguishable. In the pooled-survey models, Black children's odds of high BMI were 59% higher than White children's (odds ratio [OR] = 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]= 1.32, 1.92). Sociodemographic predictors reduced the racial disparity to 46% (OR = 1.46; 95% CI = 1.17, 1.81). Prenatal, perinatal, and early life predictors reduced the disparity to nonsignificance (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 0.93, 1.49). Maternal prepregnancy obesity and short-duration or no breastfeeding were among predictors for which racial differences in children’s exposures most disadvantaged Black children.

Conclusions. Racial disparities in early childhood high BMI were largely explained by potentially modifiable risk and protective factors.

Bibliography Citation
Weden, Margaret M., Peter B. Brownell and Michael S. Rendall. "Prenatal, Perinatal, Early Life, and Sociodemographic Factors Underlying Racial Differences in the Likelihood of High Body Mass Index in Early Childhood." American Journal of Public Health 102,11 (November 2012): 2057-2067.
8. Weden, Margaret M.
Brownell, Peter B.
Rendall, Michael S.
Lau, Christopher
Fernandes, Meenakshi
Nazarov, Zafar
Parent-Reported Height and Weight as Sources of Bias in Survey Estimates of Childhood Obesity
American Journal of Epidemiology 178,3 (1 August 2013): 461-473.
Also: http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/178/3/461.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Data Quality/Consistency; Height; Obesity; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Weight

Parental reporting of height and weight was evaluated for US children aged 2–13 years. The prevalence of obesity (defined as a body mass index value (calculated as weight (kg)/height (m)2) in the 95th percentile or higher) and its height and weight components were compared in child supplements of 2 nationally representative surveys: the 1996–2008 Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort (NLSY79-Child) and the 1997 Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID-CDS). Sociodemographic differences in parent reporting error were analyzed. Error was largest for children aged 2–5 years. Underreporting of height, not overreporting of weight, generated a strong upward bias in obesity prevalence at those ages. Frequencies of parent-reported heights below the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (Atlanta, Georgia) first percentile were implausibly high at 16.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 14.3, 19.0) in the NLSY79-Child and 20.6% (95% CI: 16.0, 26.3) in the PSID-CDS. They were highest among low-income children at 33.2% (95% CI: 22.4, 46.1) in the PSID-CDS and 26.2% (95% CI: 20.2, 33.2) in the NLSY79-Child. Bias in the reporting of obesity decreased with children's age and reversed direction at ages 12–13 years. Underreporting of weight increased with age, and underreporting of height decreased with age. We recommend caution to researchers who use parent-reported heights, especially for very young children, and offer practical solutions for survey data collection and research on child obesity.
Bibliography Citation
Weden, Margaret M., Peter B. Brownell, Michael S. Rendall, Christopher Lau, Meenakshi Fernandes and Zafar Nazarov. "Parent-Reported Height and Weight as Sources of Bias in Survey Estimates of Childhood Obesity." American Journal of Epidemiology 178,3 (1 August 2013): 461-473.
9. Zvavitch, Polina
Rendall, Michael S.
Hurtado-Acuna, Constanza
Shattuck, Rachel
Contraceptive Consistency and Poverty After Birth
Population Research and Policy Review published online (7 November 2020): DOI: 10.1007/s11113-020-09623-6.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11113-020-09623-6:
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Contraception; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Poverty; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Unplanned pregnancies in the U.S. disproportionately occur among poor, less educated, and minority women, but it is unclear whether poverty following a birth is itself an outcome of this pregnancy planning status. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (n = 2101) and National Survey of Family Growth (n = 778), we constructed 2-year sequences of contraceptive use before a birth that signal an unplanned versus a planned birth. We regressed poverty in the year of the birth both on this contraceptive-sequence variable and on sociodemographic indicators including previous employment and poverty status in the year before the birth, race/ethnicity, education, partnership status, birth order, and family background. Compared to sequences indicating a planned birth, sequences of inconsistent use and non-use of contraception were associated with a higher likelihood of poverty following a birth, both before and after controlling for sociodemographic variables, and before and after additionally controlling for poverty status before the birth. In pooled-survey estimates with all controls included, having not used contraception consistently is associated with a 42% higher odds of poverty after birth. The positive association of poverty after birth with contraceptive inconsistency or non-use, however, is limited to women with low to medium educational attainment. These findings encourage further exploration into relationships between contraceptive access and behavior and subsequent adverse outcomes for the mother and her children.
Bibliography Citation
Zvavitch, Polina, Michael S. Rendall, Constanza Hurtado-Acuna and Rachel Shattuck. "Contraceptive Consistency and Poverty After Birth." Population Research and Policy Review published online (7 November 2020): DOI: 10.1007/s11113-020-09623-6.
10. Zvavitch, Polina
Rendall, Michael S.
Hurtado, Constanza
Shattuck, Rachel
Contraceptive Consistency and Poverty After Birth
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Contraception; Poverty; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Unplanned pregnancies in the U.S. disproportionately occur among poor, less educated, and minority women, but it is unclear whether poverty following a birth is itself an outcome of this pregnancy planning status. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and National Survey of Family Growth, we constructed three sequences of contraceptive behavior before a birth that signal unplanned versus planned behavior. We regressed poverty immediately after the birth both on this contraceptive-sequence variable and on socioeconomic indicators including race, education and partnership status. Compared to sequences indicating a planned birth, sequences of inconsistent use and non-use of contraception were associated with higher likelihood of poverty following a birth, both before and after controlling for socioeconomic status, and before and after controlling for poverty before the birth. These findings encourage further exploration into relationships between contraceptive access and behavior and subsequent adverse outcomes for the mother and her children.
Bibliography Citation
Zvavitch, Polina, Michael S. Rendall, Constanza Hurtado and Rachel Shattuck. "Contraceptive Consistency and Poverty After Birth." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.