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Author: Shattuck, Rachel
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Shattuck, Rachel
Early Employment and Family Formation in the United States
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland, College Park, 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing; Educational Attainment; Employment; Family Formation; Marriage; Military Service; Racial Differences; Veterans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this dissertation, I examine three scenarios by which U.S. young adults' early employment and access to material resources intersect with their family formation behavior. I first address how educational attainment and early employment prospects enable and constrain young women's ability to enter into the kind of family forms they prefer. I investigate the relationship between women's preferences as stated in adolescence for or against having children while unmarried, their socioeconomic resources in young adulthood, and their eventual likelihood of having marital first birth, having a nonmarital first birth, or continuing to postpone childbearing. I find that after accounting for individual resource acquisition and early partner characteristics, women's preferences play a stronger role in whether or not they postpone childbearing than in whether they have a marital versus a nomarital first birth. I next address the role of early employment experiences and early family formation behavior as they affect the accuracy of young women's retrospective reporting on the timing of their first stable employment. I use panel data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth-1997 (NLSY97) to evaluate the accuracy of responses to retrospective questions about first stable employment from three surveys that interview respondent retrospectively about their first substantial employment. I find that women with higher early employment history salience and lower complexity, and those who have "anchoring" biographical details of early family formation report more accurately the timing of their first employment. I next address the topic of how early employment in the military affects veterans' likelihood of entering into race/ethnic intermarriages, which are more common among military veterans than in the general population, and have increased at a faster rate among veterans than non-veterans from the 1960s to the present. I show that a combination of exposure to diverse race/ethnic composition in a military setting, training and benefits that facilitate veterans' socioeconomic advancement, and military policies and norms that hold personnel to standards of nondiscriminatory behavior jointly contribute to increasing veterans' likelihood of intermarriage relative to non-veterans. These effects are strongest for black and white veterans.
Bibliography Citation
Shattuck, Rachel. Early Employment and Family Formation in the United States. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland, College Park, 2015.
2. Shattuck, Rachel
Rendall, Michael S.
Retrospective Reporting of First Employment in the Life-courses of U.S. Women
Sociological Methodology 47,1 (August 2017): 307-344.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abstract/10.1177/0081175017723397
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Comparison Group (Reference group); Data Quality/Consistency; Employment, History; Life Course; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The authors investigate the accuracy of young women's retrospective reporting on their first substantial employment in three major, nationally representative U.S. surveys, examining hypotheses that longer recall duration, employment histories with lower salience and higher complexity, and an absence of "anchoring" biographical details will adversely affect reporting accuracy. The authors compare retrospective reports to benchmark panel survey estimates for the same cohorts. Sociodemographic groups--notably non-Hispanic white women and women with college-educated mothers--whose early employment histories at these ages are in aggregate more complex (multiple jobs) and lower in salience (more part-time jobs) are more likely to omit the occurrence of their first substantial job or employment and to misreport their first job or employment as occurring at an older age. Also, retrospective reports are skewed toward overreporting longer, therefore more salient, later jobs over shorter, earlier jobs. The relatively small magnitudes of differences, however, indicate that the retrospective questions nevertheless capture these summary indicators of first substantial employment reasonably accurately. Moreover, these differences are especially small for groups of women who are more likely to experience labor-market disadvantage and for women with early births.
Bibliography Citation
Shattuck, Rachel and Michael S. Rendall. "Retrospective Reporting of First Employment in the Life-courses of U.S. Women." Sociological Methodology 47,1 (August 2017): 307-344.
3. Shattuck, Rachel
Rendall, Michael S.
Retrospective Versus Panel Reports of First Employment in the Life Courses of U.S. Women
Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Employment, History; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Research Methodology; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigates accuracy of reporting on young women's first employment, comparing retrospective reports in the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) and the first wave of the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income Program Participation (SIPP) to annual panel reports in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97). We evaluate differences in recall accuracy by time elapsed between period reported on and interview. We also evaluate differences in reporting accuracy by race/ethnicity, nativity and mother's education, juxtaposed with the salience and complexity of each group's employment histories. We find relatively small, but statistically-significant differences between reporting in the SIPP and NSFG versus the NLSY97, in a direction that suggests some forgetting of episodes of first job or employment spell of at least six months duration in retrospective reports. We also find some evidence that more complex and less salient (part-time) employment experiences result in more recall errors: Young women with a mother who did not graduate from high school and young women with a college-graduate mother had both the highest proportions of their early employment in part-time jobs and the largest magnitudes of error in recalling first stable job or employment spell. We found no indications of substantial race/ethnic differences in reporting. Overall, our results are reassuring with respect to the ability of surveys to capture accurately summary indicators of first stable employment in retrospective questions.
Bibliography Citation
Shattuck, Rachel and Michael S. Rendall. "Retrospective Versus Panel Reports of First Employment in the Life Courses of U.S. Women." Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015.
4. Zvavitch, Polina
Rendall, Michael S.
Hurtado, Constanza
Shattuck, Rachel
Contraceptive Consistency and Poverty After Birth
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Contraception; Poverty; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Unplanned pregnancies in the U.S. disproportionately occur among poor, less educated, and minority women, but it is unclear whether poverty following a birth is itself an outcome of this pregnancy planning status. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and National Survey of Family Growth, we constructed three sequences of contraceptive behavior before a birth that signal unplanned versus planned behavior. We regressed poverty immediately after the birth both on this contraceptive-sequence variable and on socioeconomic indicators including race, education and partnership status. Compared to sequences indicating a planned birth, sequences of inconsistent use and non-use of contraception were associated with higher likelihood of poverty following a birth, both before and after controlling for socioeconomic status, and before and after controlling for poverty before the birth. These findings encourage further exploration into relationships between contraceptive access and behavior and subsequent adverse outcomes for the mother and her children.
Bibliography Citation
Zvavitch, Polina, Michael S. Rendall, Constanza Hurtado and Rachel Shattuck. "Contraceptive Consistency and Poverty After Birth." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.