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Author: Minh, Anita
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Kerr, Jelani
Minh, Anita
Siddiqi, Arjumand
Muntaner, Carles
O'Campo, Patricia
A Cross-Country Comparison of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Marijuana Use among Youth Who Are Employed, in School or Out of the Labor Force and School (OLFS)
Journal of Youth Studies 22,5 (2019): 623-641.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13676261.2018.1529862?journalCode=cjys20
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Canada, Canadian; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Cross-national Analysis; Drug Use; Labor Force Participation; Unemployment, Youth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Labor force and school attachment may influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use in the US and Canada. Differences in social welfare provision, which provide protections for individuals with insecure attachments to the labor force or education, may in turn impact the behavior and health of youth in these countries. Yet, there is little research to understand the health consequences for youth of being out of the labor force and school (OLFS). Data of 25-29 year old participants of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (year 2010) and the Canadian Community Health Survey (2009-2010) were used to examine differences in substance use by labor force and school attachment. Logistic regression suggests that OLFS in the US and Canada were less likely to report alcohol uptake and more likely to use tobacco compared to employed youth. Unemployment was differentially associated with substance use behaviors by country. Country of residence and subsequent exposure to social welfare policy does not appear to impact substance use behaviors among OLFS. However, associations of unemployment and gender by country indicates differences in substance use behavior. More research should seek to understand factors that influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among OLFS and unemployed youth.
Bibliography Citation
Kerr, Jelani, Anita Minh, Arjumand Siddiqi, Carles Muntaner and Patricia O'Campo. "A Cross-Country Comparison of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Marijuana Use among Youth Who Are Employed, in School or Out of the Labor Force and School (OLFS)." Journal of Youth Studies 22,5 (2019): 623-641.
2. Minh, Anita
Bultmann, Ute
Reijneveld, Sijmen A.
van Zon, Sander K.R.
McLeod, Christopher B.
Childhood Socioeconomic Status and Depressive Symptom Trajectories in the Transition to Adulthood in the United States and Canada
Journal of Adolescent Health published online (14 July 2020): DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.05.033.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X20302895
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY); Childhood; Cross-national Analysis; Depression (see also CESD); Family Income; Modeling, MIxture Models/Finite Mixture Models; Socioeconomic Background

Purpose: We examined whether young people in the U.S. and Canada exhibit similar depressive symptom trajectories in the transition to adulthood and compared the effect of childhood socioeconomic status on trajectory membership.

Methods: We used the American National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Child/Young Adult (n = 6,315) and the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (n = 3,666). Depressive symptoms were measured using five items from the Center for Epidemiological Studies on Depression scale. Latent trajectories of depressive symptoms from ages 16-25 years were identified using growth mixture models. We estimated the effect of childhood family income, parental education, and parental unemployment on trajectory membership using multivariable Poisson regression models with robust variances.

Results: We identified four similar trajectories in the two countries: (1) low stable; (2) mid-peak; (3) increasing; and (4) decreasing. Relatively more Americans were in the low-stable trajectory group than Canadians (77.6% vs. 64.9%), and fewer Americans were in the decreasing group (7.1% vs. 19.1%). In the U.S., childhood family income in the bottom two quartiles was related to higher rates of increasing trajectory membership compared with income in the top quartile (incidence rate ratios: 1.59–1.79, p < .05), but not in Canada. In the U.S., parental education at a high school level was associated with higher rates of decreasing trajectory membership compared with higher education (incidence rate ratio = 1.45, confidence interval: 1.10–1.91; p = .01), but not in Canada.

Bibliography Citation
Minh, Anita, Ute Bultmann, Sijmen A. Reijneveld, Sander K.R. van Zon and Christopher B. McLeod. "Childhood Socioeconomic Status and Depressive Symptom Trajectories in the Transition to Adulthood in the United States and Canada." Journal of Adolescent Health published online (14 July 2020): DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.05.033.