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Author: Leonard, Stephanie
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Leonard, Stephanie
Understanding the Relationship of Pregnancy Weight and Weight Change with Infant and Child Health
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Berkeley, 2017
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); Childhood; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Household Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Parents, Behavior; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The second paper identifies longitudinal trajectories of maternal weight from prepregnancy through the postpartum period and assesses the relationship between maternal weight trajectories and offspring obesity in childhood. The third paper determines if maternal history of physical abuse in childhood is related to the risk of offspring overweight in childhood, and whether prepregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain play mediating roles in such an association. These dissertation papers together provide valuable information to help determine ranges of weight gain during pregnancy that minimize risk of adverse infant and child health outcomes. They also intend to stimulate further research to establish a scientific evidence base for creating effective interventions and clinical gestational weight gain guidelines. Promoting healthy weight and weight gain in pregnancy presents a potentially feasible and effective opportunity to improve infant and child health.
Bibliography Citation
Leonard, Stephanie. Understanding the Relationship of Pregnancy Weight and Weight Change with Infant and Child Health. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Berkeley, 2017.
2. Leonard, Stephanie
Petito, Lucia C.
Rehkopf, David
Ritchie, Lorrene
Abrams, Barbara
Maternal History of Child Abuse and Obesity Risk in Offspring: Mediation by Weight in Pregnancy
Childhood Obesity 13,4 (August 2017): 259-266.
Also: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28440693
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Health, Mental; Household Influences; Obesity; Parental Influences; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Among every 100 mothers who reported physical abuse in childhood, there were 3.7 (95% confidence interval: -0.1 to 7.5) excess cases of obesity in 2- to 5-year olds compared with mothers who did not report physical abuse. Differences in prepregnancy BMI, but not gestational weight gain, accounted for 25.7% of these excess cases. There was no evidence of a similar relationship for household alcoholism or mental illness or for obesity in older children.
Bibliography Citation
Leonard, Stephanie, Lucia C. Petito, David Rehkopf, Lorrene Ritchie and Barbara Abrams. "Maternal History of Child Abuse and Obesity Risk in Offspring: Mediation by Weight in Pregnancy." Childhood Obesity 13,4 (August 2017): 259-266.
3. Petito, Lucia C.
Leonard, Stephanie
Rehkopf, David
Ritchie, Lorrene
Abrams, Barbara
Maternal Physical Abuse in Childhood is Associated with Offspring Overweight and Obesity in Early Childhood
Presented: Miami FL, Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologic Research Annual Meeting, June 2016
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologic Research
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Health; Obesity; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) have recently been associated with high gestational weight gain (GWG), and high GWG has been associated with child obesity. We hypothesized that maternal ACE exposures are associated with offspring obesity, partially mediated by high GWG. Our study included 4,771 mother-child pairs from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979-2012). We used log-linear regression models that accounted for the complex survey design to estimate the associations of three maternal ACE measures (physical abuse, mental illness in the household, and alcohol abuse in the household) with the outcomes: ever obese or ever overweight/ obese at ages 2-5 years, 6-11 years, or 12-19 years old. For significant associations, we then estimated the total direct effect by adding GWG (measured with z-scores standardized for gestational duration) to the adjusted regression model. Next, we estimated the natural direct effect by allowing GWG in the model to vary as it would in the absence of the exposure.
Bibliography Citation
Petito, Lucia C., Stephanie Leonard, David Rehkopf, Lorrene Ritchie and Barbara Abrams. "Maternal Physical Abuse in Childhood is Associated with Offspring Overweight and Obesity in Early Childhood." Presented: Miami FL, Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologic Research Annual Meeting, June 2016.
4. Vable, Anusha M.
Cohen, Alison K.
Leonard, Stephanie
Glymour, M. Maria
Duarte, Catherine
Yen, Irene H.
Do the Health Benefits of Education Vary by Sociodemographic Subgroup? Differential Returns to Education and Implications for Health Inequities
Annals of Epidemiology 28,11 (November 2018): 759-766.e5.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1047279718305209
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Socioeconomic Background

Methods: Using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (N=6,158) cohort data, we evaluate education attained by age 25 and mental (MCS) and physical (PCS) health component summary scores at age 50. Race/ethnicity, sex, geography, immigration status, and childhood socioeconomic status (cSES) were evaluated as effect modifiers in birth-year adjusted linear regression models.
Bibliography Citation
Vable, Anusha M., Alison K. Cohen, Stephanie Leonard, M. Maria Glymour, Catherine Duarte and Irene H. Yen. "Do the Health Benefits of Education Vary by Sociodemographic Subgroup? Differential Returns to Education and Implications for Health Inequities." Annals of Epidemiology 28,11 (November 2018): 759-766.e5.