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Author: Petito, Lucia C.
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Deardorff, Julianna
Smith, Louisa H.
Petito, Lucia C.
Kim, Hyunju
Abrams, Barbara
Maternal Prepregnancy Weight and Children’s Behavioral and Emotional Outcomes
American Journal of Preventive Medicine 53,4 (October 2017): 432-440.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749379717302702
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Body Mass Index (BMI); Childhood; Mothers, Health; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior

Methods: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the Children and Young Adults surveys are U.S.-based, ongoing longitudinal studies, initiated in 1979 and 1986, respectively. Mothers (n=2,952) reported pregnancy and child (n=5,660) developmental information at multiple time points. Child total, internalizing, and externalizing problems at ages 9–11 years were assessed using the Behavior Problems Index (BPI), collected biennially until 2012. Associations between prepregnancy BMI and child BPI outcomes were examined, as well as two- and three-way interactions by race and gender. Analyses were conducted in 2017.

Results: Boys whose mothers had higher prepregnancy weights exhibited higher total BPI and externalizing scores at ages 9–11 years versus those with normal-weight mothers. Boys with severely obese mothers had higher total BPI (mean difference=7.99, 95% CI=3.53, 12.46) and externalizing (mean difference=5.77, 95% CI=1.50, 10.04) scores. Prepregnancy underweight was associated with boys’ higher total BPI (mean difference=2.34, 95% CI=0.02, 4.66) and externalizing (mean difference=3.30, 95% CI=0.69, 5.91); these associations were not significant in sensitivity analyses. No associations emerged for girls or internalizing problems. Two-way interactions by race and three-way interactions by race and gender were not significant.

Bibliography Citation
Deardorff, Julianna, Louisa H. Smith, Lucia C. Petito, Hyunju Kim and Barbara Abrams. "Maternal Prepregnancy Weight and Children’s Behavioral and Emotional Outcomes." American Journal of Preventive Medicine 53,4 (October 2017): 432-440.
2. Leonard, Stephanie
Petito, Lucia C.
Rehkopf, David
Ritchie, Lorrene
Abrams, Barbara
Maternal History of Child Abuse and Obesity Risk in Offspring: Mediation by Weight in Pregnancy
Childhood Obesity 13,4 (August 2017): 259-266.
Also: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28440693
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Health, Mental; Household Influences; Obesity; Parental Influences; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Among every 100 mothers who reported physical abuse in childhood, there were 3.7 (95% confidence interval: -0.1 to 7.5) excess cases of obesity in 2- to 5-year olds compared with mothers who did not report physical abuse. Differences in prepregnancy BMI, but not gestational weight gain, accounted for 25.7% of these excess cases. There was no evidence of a similar relationship for household alcoholism or mental illness or for obesity in older children.
Bibliography Citation
Leonard, Stephanie, Lucia C. Petito, David Rehkopf, Lorrene Ritchie and Barbara Abrams. "Maternal History of Child Abuse and Obesity Risk in Offspring: Mediation by Weight in Pregnancy." Childhood Obesity 13,4 (August 2017): 259-266.
3. Pear, Veronica
Petito, Lucia C.
Abrams, Barbara
The Role of Maternal Adverse Childhood Experiences and Race in Intergenerational High-Risk Smoking Behaviors
Nicotine and Tobacco Research 19,5 (1 May 2017): 623-630.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/ntr/article/19/5/623/3590443
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Company ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Health; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Introduction: A history of adversity in childhood is associated with cigarette smoking in adulthood, but there is less evidence for prenatal and next-generation offspring smoking. We investigated the association between maternal history of childhood adversity, pregnancy smoking, and early initiation of smoking in offspring, overall and by maternal race/ethnicity.

Methods: Data on maternal childhood exposure to physical abuse, household alcohol abuse, and household mental illness, prenatal smoking behaviors, and offspring age of smoking initiation were analyzed from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79, n = 2999 mothers) and the NLSY79 Children and Young Adults Survey (NLSYCYA, n = 6596 children). Adjusted risk ratios were estimated using log-linear regression models. We assessed multiplicative interaction by race/ethnicity for all associations and a three-way interaction by maternal exposure to adversity and race/ethnicity for the association between prenatal and child smoking.

Results: Maternal exposure to childhood physical abuse was significantly associated with 39% and 20% increased risks of prenatal smoking and child smoking, respectively. Household alcohol abuse was associated with significantly increased risks of 20% for prenatal smoking and 17% for child smoking. The prenatal smoking–child smoking relationship was modified by maternal exposure to household alcohol abuse and race. There were increased risks for Hispanic and white/other mothers as compared to the lowest risk group: black mothers who did not experience childhood household alcohol abuse.

Bibliography Citation
Pear, Veronica, Lucia C. Petito and Barbara Abrams. "The Role of Maternal Adverse Childhood Experiences and Race in Intergenerational High-Risk Smoking Behaviors." Nicotine and Tobacco Research 19,5 (1 May 2017): 623-630.
4. Petito, Lucia C.
Leonard, Stephanie
Rehkopf, David
Ritchie, Lorrene
Abrams, Barbara
Maternal Physical Abuse in Childhood is Associated with Offspring Overweight and Obesity in Early Childhood
Presented: Miami FL, Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologic Research Annual Meeting, June 2016
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologic Research
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Health; Obesity; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) have recently been associated with high gestational weight gain (GWG), and high GWG has been associated with child obesity. We hypothesized that maternal ACE exposures are associated with offspring obesity, partially mediated by high GWG. Our study included 4,771 mother-child pairs from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979-2012). We used log-linear regression models that accounted for the complex survey design to estimate the associations of three maternal ACE measures (physical abuse, mental illness in the household, and alcohol abuse in the household) with the outcomes: ever obese or ever overweight/ obese at ages 2-5 years, 6-11 years, or 12-19 years old. For significant associations, we then estimated the total direct effect by adding GWG (measured with z-scores standardized for gestational duration) to the adjusted regression model. Next, we estimated the natural direct effect by allowing GWG in the model to vary as it would in the absence of the exposure.
Bibliography Citation
Petito, Lucia C., Stephanie Leonard, David Rehkopf, Lorrene Ritchie and Barbara Abrams. "Maternal Physical Abuse in Childhood is Associated with Offspring Overweight and Obesity in Early Childhood." Presented: Miami FL, Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologic Research Annual Meeting, June 2016.
5. Ranchod, Yamini K.
Headen, Irene
Petito, Lucia C.
Deardorff, Julianna
Rehkopf, David
Abrams, Barbara
Maternal Childhood Adversity, Prepregnancy Obesity, and Gestational Weight Gain
American Journal of Preventive Medicine 50, 4 (April 2016): 463-469.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749379715005231
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); Childhood; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Health, Mental; Household Influences; Obesity; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Socioeconomic Factors

Introduction: Growing evidence suggests that exposure to childhood adversity may influence obesity across the life course. High maternal weight complicates pregnancy and increases the risk of child obesity. This study examined the association between maternal childhood adversity and pregnancy-related weight in a large U.S. sample.

Methods: Data on 6,199 pregnancies from 2,873 women followed from 1979 to 2012 by the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 were analyzed in 2014. Associations between three adversity exposures before age 18 years (history of physical abuse, alcohol problems, or mental illness in the household) and two maternal weight outcomes (prepregnancy obesity and excessive gestational weight gain) were modeled separately using survey-adjusted log-binomial models.

Results: After adjusting for race/ethnicity and early-life socioeconomic factors, childhood physical abuse was associated with a 60% increase in the risk of prepregnancy obesity (adjusted risk ratio=1.6, 95% CI=1.1, 2.2). Household alcohol abuse was associated with a 30% increase in prepregnancy obesity (adjusted risk ratio=1.3, 95% CI=1.0, 1.7), as was household mental illness (adjusted risk ratio=1.3, 95% CI=0.8, 1.9), but the mental illness exposure was not significant. Physical abuse and household alcohol abuse were associated with a significant 20% increase in the risk of excessive gestational weight gain; mental illness was not.

Conclusions: Adversity in early life may affect maternal weight before and during pregnancy. Screening and treating women of reproductive age for childhood adversity and its negative effects could significantly reduce obesity-related health outcomes for women and their children.

Bibliography Citation
Ranchod, Yamini K., Irene Headen, Lucia C. Petito, Julianna Deardorff, David Rehkopf and Barbara Abrams. "Maternal Childhood Adversity, Prepregnancy Obesity, and Gestational Weight Gain." American Journal of Preventive Medicine 50, 4 (April 2016): 463-469.