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Author: Hemez, Paul
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Hemez, Paul
Institutional Participation and the Delay in Entry Into Marriage: Generational Differences Between Late Baby Boomer and Early Millennials
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; College Enrollment; Incarceration/Jail; Marriage; Military Enlistment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Concurrent patterns of the retreat from marriage and institutional participation among young adults brings into question whether shifts in the rates of educational enrollment, the military enlistment, and incarceration have contributed to shifting patterns of entry into marriage. Using the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 and 1997, this study examines changes in the effects enrollment in three institutions (school enrollment, active duty military service, incarceration) on the odds of entry into a first marriage for two cohorts of men born 20 years apart (1960-1964 and 1980-1984). Additionally, decomposition techniques are employed to estimate the amount of the difference in the odds of marriage during young adulthood (18-29) that is due to changes in participation into these institutions. Results from this study have implications for our understanding of the influence that participation in various institutions has on prolonging the transition to adulthood among contemporary men.
Bibliography Citation
Hemez, Paul. "Institutional Participation and the Delay in Entry Into Marriage: Generational Differences Between Late Baby Boomer and Early Millennials." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
2. Hemez, Paul
Military Service and Entry into Marriage: Comparing Service Members to Civilians
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Marriage; Military Service; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The military offers a springboard to economic stability during a time when it is increasingly difficult for young minority and disadvantaged men to achieve such stability. While enlisting in the armed forces was positively associated with entry into marriage during the first fifteen years of the all-volunteer force, the relationship between military service and marriage among subsequent generations of young adults has been unexplored. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this study aims to examine the influence of enlistment on entry into marriage for contemporary young men. A specific focus is to consider whether the race and social class marriage gap persists among enlistees. Preliminary results suggest that young men who served (between 1997 and 2011) were significantly more likely to marry, and did so at younger ages, than civilians. This study offers insights into pathways to marriage for social groups who are disadvantaged in the marriage market.
Bibliography Citation
Hemez, Paul. "Military Service and Entry into Marriage: Comparing Service Members to Civilians." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
3. Hemez, Paul
Military Service and Entry into Marriage: Comparing Service Members to Civilians
M.A. Thesis, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green State University, 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Event History; Marriage; Military Enlistment; Military Service

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The military offers a springboard to economic stability during a time when it is increasingly difficult for young minority and disadvantaged men to achieve such stability. While enlisting in the armed forces was positively associated with entry into marriage during the first fifteen years of the all-volunteer force, the relationship between military service and entry into marriage among subsequent generations of young adults has been unexplored. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, the present study aims to examine the influence of enlistment on entry into marriage for a contemporary cohort of young men. A specific focus is to consider whether the race and social class marriage gap persists between enlistees and civilians. Event-history analyses reveal that young men who served (between 1997 and 2011) were significantly more likely to marry, than their civilian counterparts. Furthermore, there was no difference in the odds of marriage among Black and White men in the military, while some evidence suggests that Hispanic enlistees were more likely to marry than Whites who also enlisted. These findings offer insights into pathways to marriage for social groups who are disadvantaged in the marriage market.
Bibliography Citation
Hemez, Paul. Military Service and Entry into Marriage: Comparing Service Members to Civilians. M.A. Thesis, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green State University, 2017.
4. Hemez, Paul
Young Adulthood: Cohabitation, Birth, and Marriage Experiences
NCFMR Family Profiles Report FP-18-22: National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, 2018.
Also: https://www.bgsu.edu/ncfmr/resources/data/family-profiles/hemez-young-adults-cohab-birth-mar-fp-18-22.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Age at First Marriage; Childbearing; Cohabitation; Marriage; Parenthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using rounds 1-17 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this Family Profile examines the share of young adults who had a child, got married, and/or cohabited before their 30th birthday for the cohort of men and women who were born between 1980 and 1984.
Bibliography Citation
Hemez, Paul. "Young Adulthood: Cohabitation, Birth, and Marriage Experiences." NCFMR Family Profiles Report FP-18-22: National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, 2018.
5. Hemez, Paul
Mowen, Thomas
Exploring the "School-to-Prison" Pipeline: How School Suspensions Influence Incarceration During Young Adulthood
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Incarceration/Jail; Modeling, Mixed Effects; School Suspension/Expulsion; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The "school-to-prison pipeline" references a process in which youth who experience punitive punishment in school are increasingly enmeshed within the criminal justice system. While this metaphor is commonly accepted, few studies have examined the extent to which exclusionary school discipline significantly alters pathways towards incarceration as youth transition into young adulthood. Applying a life-course perspective and leveraging 15 waves of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this study examines how school suspensions influence odds of imprisonment during young adulthood. Mixed-effects longitudinal models demonstrate that receiving a suspension increases the odds of incarceration, even after accounting for key covariates including levels of criminal offending. However, results show that repeated suspensions do not appear to confer additional risk of incarceration. Results carry implications for the ways in which school punishment impacts youths' life-course.
Bibliography Citation
Hemez, Paul and Thomas Mowen. "Exploring the "School-to-Prison" Pipeline: How School Suspensions Influence Incarceration During Young Adulthood." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
6. Manning, Wendy D.
Joyner, Kara
Hemez, Paul
Cupka, Cassandra Jean
Measuring Cohabitation in National Surveys
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Data Quality/Consistency; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Cohabitation is one of the fastest growing family forms in the United States, but has not been consistently measured across surveys. Recent rounds of the Current Population Survey (CPS), National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY-97) and National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) are used to assess the quality of data on cohabitation. Results demonstrated that the surveys provide similar estimates of current cohabitation status, except the CPS resulted in lower estimates. In terms of cohabitation experience (i.e., having ever cohabited), Add Health produced higher estimates, whereas both the NSFG and NLSY-97 produced lower estimates. We documented a strong education gradient across all surveys, with lower levels of current cohabitation and cohabitating experience with increases in educational attainment. Race/ethnic differentials in cohabitation were inconsistent across surveys. We discussed aspects of sampling and measurement that potentially explain differences in estimates.
Bibliography Citation
Manning, Wendy D., Kara Joyner, Paul Hemez and Cassandra Jean Cupka. "Measuring Cohabitation in National Surveys." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.