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Author: Pleck, Joseph H.
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Astone, Nan Marie
Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Men's Differing Work Trajectories and Fatherhood
Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
Also: http://paa2007.princeton.edu/abstractViewer.aspx?submissionId=71111
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Fatherhood; Modeling; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we ask whether U.S. men can be usefully classified into distinct groups with respect to their trajectories of work effort from adolescence to adulthood. In addition, assuming such groups can be distinguished, we ask how their patterns of fathering differ across these groups. Our data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort, and our methods are latent class analysis.
Bibliography Citation
Astone, Nan Marie, Jacinda K. Dariotis, Freya L. Sonenstein and Joseph H. Pleck. "Men's Differing Work Trajectories and Fatherhood." Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
2. Astone, Nan Marie
Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Hynes, Kathryn
Men's Work Efforts and the Transition to Fatherhood
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 31,1 (March 2010): 3-13.
Also: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10834-009-9174-7
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Fatherhood; Marital Status; Marriage; Work Ethic

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we tested three hypotheses: (a) the transition to fatherhood is associated with an increase in work effort; (b) the positive association (if any) between the transition to fatherhood and work effort is greater for fathers who are married at the time of the transition; and (c) the association (if any) is greater for men who make the transition at younger ages. The data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort. The transition to fatherhood was associated with an increase in work effort among young unmarried men, but not for married men. Among married men who were on-time fathers, work effort decreased. Among childless men, the marriage transition was associated with increased work effort.
Bibliography Citation
Astone, Nan Marie, Jacinda K. Dariotis, Freya L. Sonenstein, Joseph H. Pleck and Kathryn Hynes. "Men's Work Efforts and the Transition to Fatherhood." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 31,1 (March 2010): 3-13.
3. Astone, Nan Marie
Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
How Do Men's Work Lives Change After Fatherhood?
Presented: Ithaca, NY, Cornell Evolving Family Conference on New Data On Fathers, An Examination of Recent Trends in Fatherhood and Father Involvement, September 2006.
Also: http://www.socialsciences.cornell.edu/0407/Fatherhood%20Abstracts.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for the Social Sciences - Cornell University
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Ethnic Differences; Fatherhood; Marital Status; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Racial Differences; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we examine how various aspects of men's work lives change when they become fathers and whether or not these changes vary by the marital status of the birth and by ethnicity. Our data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). We use fixed effects models to measure intra-individual change in employment status, number of hours worked and wages. Preliminary findings suggest that becoming a father within marriage is associated with an increase in the number of hours worked among both European and African American men. Becoming a father outside marriage is also associated with an increase in the number of hours worked among European American men, but not African Americans.
Bibliography Citation
Astone, Nan Marie, Jacinda K. Dariotis, Freya L. Sonenstein, Joseph H. Pleck and H. Elizabeth Peters. "How Do Men's Work Lives Change After Fatherhood?." Presented: Ithaca, NY, Cornell Evolving Family Conference on New Data On Fathers, An Examination of Recent Trends in Fatherhood and Father Involvement, September 2006.
4. Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Astone, Nan Marie
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Pathways of Early Fatherhood, Marriage, and Employment: A Latent Class Growth Analysis
Demography 48,2 (May 2011): 593-623.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/8820l65763327583/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Age at First Marriage; Economic Well-Being; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Employment, Youth; Fatherhood; Heterogeneity; Life Course; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), young fathers include heterogeneous subgroups with varying early life pathways in terms of fatherhood timing, the timing of first marriage, and holding full-time employment. Using latent class growth analysis with 10 observations between ages 18 and 37, we derived five latent classes with median ages of first fatherhood below the cohort median (26.4), constituting distinct early fatherhood pathways representing 32.4% of NLSY men: (A) Young Married Fathers, (B) Teen Married Fathers, (C) Young Underemployed Married Fathers, (D) Young Underemployed Single Fathers, and (E) Young Later-Marrying Fathers. A sixth latent class of men who become fathers around the cohort median, following full-time employment and marriage (On-Time On-Sequence Fathers), is the comparison group. With sociodemographic background controlled, all early fatherhood pathways show disadvantage in at least some later-life circumstances (earnings, educational attainment, marital status, and incarceration). The extent of disadvantage is greater when early fatherhood occurs at relatively younger ages (before age 20), occurs outside marriage, or occurs outside full-time employment. The relative disadvantage associated with early fatherhood, unlike early motherhood, increases over the life course.

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Bibliography Citation
Dariotis, Jacinda K., Joseph H. Pleck, Nan Marie Astone and Freya L. Sonenstein. "Pathways of Early Fatherhood, Marriage, and Employment: A Latent Class Growth Analysis." Demography 48,2 (May 2011): 593-623.
5. Hofferth, Sandra L.
Cabrera, Natasha
Forry, Nicole D.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Paternal Residence and Parental Involvement with Early Adolescents: The Mediating Role of Parental Relationship Quality
Working Paper, Maryland Population Research Center, University of Maryland, February 2008
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Maryland Population Research Center
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Child Support; Ethnic Differences; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Involvement; Fathers, Presence; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Interaction; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Racial Differences; Relationship Conflict

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper addresses the association of biological fathers' residence to their involvement and to mothers' involvement with their adolescent children, and the role of parental relationship quality in this association. It uses as its sample 2,161 adolescent children of young women from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Children living with their biological fathers report greater father involvement than children whose fathers are nonresidential, but this relationship is fully mediated by the quality of the relationship between the two parents. In addition, biological fathers' nonresidence has a direct positive contextual effect on maternal involvement, but has a stronger indirect negative effect via parental relationship quality. Failing to get along with one's partner has direct associations with both father and mother involvement, as well as mediates the linkage between fathers' nonresidence and the involvement of both parents.
Bibliography Citation
Hofferth, Sandra L., Natasha Cabrera, Nicole D. Forry and Joseph H. Pleck. "Paternal Residence and Parental Involvement with Early Adolescents: The Mediating Role of Parental Relationship Quality." Working Paper, Maryland Population Research Center, University of Maryland, February 2008.
6. Hofferth, Sandra L.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Vesely, Colleen
The Transmission of Parenting from Fathers to Sons
Parenting: Science and Practice 12,4 (2012): 282-305.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15295192.2012.709153
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Discipline; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Influence; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Pearlin Mastery Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Hofferth, Sandra L., Joseph H. Pleck and Colleen Vesely. "The Transmission of Parenting from Fathers to Sons." Parenting: Science and Practice 12,4 (2012): 282-305.
7. Pleck, Joseph H.
Hofferth, Sandra L.
Mother Involvement as an Influence on Father Involvement with Early Adolescents
Fathering 6,3 (Fall 2008): 267-286
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Men's Studies Press
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Fathers, Biological; Fathers, Involvement; Fathers, Presence; Marital Conflict; Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Interaction; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Stepfamilies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study hypothesized that father involvement is influenced by mothers' level of involvement as well as by marital conflict, mothers' work hours, and fathers' status as biological or step father. The analysis also tested hypotheses about mother involvement as a potential mediator of the effects of marital conflict and maternal work hours on father involvement, and hypotheses about factors influencing mother involvement. Children aged 10-14 from the NLSY79 who resided with their biological or step father and with their mother reported on each parent's involvement with them. As hypothesized, father involvement was predicted by mother involvement, and the reciprocal influence was not significant. Father involvement was associated with low marital conflict and being a biological father. Mothers' involvement partially mediated the effects of marital conflict on father involvement. If the mediating role of maternal involvement is not taken into account, the effect of marital conflict on father involvement is overestimated.
Bibliography Citation
Pleck, Joseph H. and Sandra L. Hofferth. "Mother Involvement as an Influence on Father Involvement with Early Adolescents." Fathering 6,3 (Fall 2008): 267-286.
8. Pleck, Joseph H.
Hofferth, Sandra L.
Vesely, Colleen
Cabrera, Natasha
The Transmission of Fathering from Fathers and Mothers to Sons
Presented: Toronto, ON, Father Involvement Research Conference, October 2008.
Also: http://www.fira.ca/cms/documents/147/Transmission_of_fathering_etc-pleck.ppt
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Father Involvement Research Alliance
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Discipline; Fathers, Involvement; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parent-Child Interaction; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While most attention in the media and in work-life scholarship has focused on the challenges and opportunities of working mothers, a shift to understanding fathers experiences is needed. As dual career couples become the norm (women in the US now out-earn their spouse in nearly one out of four couples) and men express greater desire to share caring responsibilities, the time seems right to address this under-researched group. What we seek to understand is how men experience fatherhood with respect to its impact on their identity and self-image. In this study, we explore the ways fathers define themselves in the context of being a working parent. We also look at the how the degree of child involvement, as well as other external factors both inside and outside their work environment, influence and shape their identity. Finally, we address how the formation of a working father identity influences career attitudes, behaviors and intentions. We will share the results of a pilot study we are conducting with relatively new fathers and follow with a discussion of the practical and scholarly implications of our findings. We will also consider ways that fathers can be assisted as they go through this change process in their own lives and discuss what can be done to help them re-define and better understand what constitutes professional and personal success.
Bibliography Citation
Pleck, Joseph H., Sandra L. Hofferth, Colleen Vesely and Natasha Cabrera. "The Transmission of Fathering from Fathers and Mothers to Sons." Presented: Toronto, ON, Father Involvement Research Conference, October 2008.