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Author: Astone, Nan Marie
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Astone, Nan Marie
Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Men's Differing Work Trajectories and Fatherhood
Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
Also: http://paa2007.princeton.edu/abstractViewer.aspx?submissionId=71111
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Fatherhood; Modeling; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we ask whether U.S. men can be usefully classified into distinct groups with respect to their trajectories of work effort from adolescence to adulthood. In addition, assuming such groups can be distinguished, we ask how their patterns of fathering differ across these groups. Our data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort, and our methods are latent class analysis.
Bibliography Citation
Astone, Nan Marie, Jacinda K. Dariotis, Freya L. Sonenstein and Joseph H. Pleck. "Men's Differing Work Trajectories and Fatherhood." Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
2. Astone, Nan Marie
Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Hynes, Kathryn
Men's Work Efforts and the Transition to Fatherhood
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 31,1 (March 2010): 3-13.
Also: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10834-009-9174-7
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Fatherhood; Marital Status; Marriage; Work Ethic

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we tested three hypotheses: (a) the transition to fatherhood is associated with an increase in work effort; (b) the positive association (if any) between the transition to fatherhood and work effort is greater for fathers who are married at the time of the transition; and (c) the association (if any) is greater for men who make the transition at younger ages. The data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort. The transition to fatherhood was associated with an increase in work effort among young unmarried men, but not for married men. Among married men who were on-time fathers, work effort decreased. Among childless men, the marriage transition was associated with increased work effort.
Bibliography Citation
Astone, Nan Marie, Jacinda K. Dariotis, Freya L. Sonenstein, Joseph H. Pleck and Kathryn Hynes. "Men's Work Efforts and the Transition to Fatherhood." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 31,1 (March 2010): 3-13.
3. Astone, Nan Marie
Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
How Do Men's Work Lives Change After Fatherhood?
Presented: Ithaca, NY, Cornell Evolving Family Conference on New Data On Fathers, An Examination of Recent Trends in Fatherhood and Father Involvement, September 2006.
Also: http://www.socialsciences.cornell.edu/0407/Fatherhood%20Abstracts.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for the Social Sciences - Cornell University
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Ethnic Differences; Fatherhood; Marital Status; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Racial Differences; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we examine how various aspects of men's work lives change when they become fathers and whether or not these changes vary by the marital status of the birth and by ethnicity. Our data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). We use fixed effects models to measure intra-individual change in employment status, number of hours worked and wages. Preliminary findings suggest that becoming a father within marriage is associated with an increase in the number of hours worked among both European and African American men. Becoming a father outside marriage is also associated with an increase in the number of hours worked among European American men, but not African Americans.
Bibliography Citation
Astone, Nan Marie, Jacinda K. Dariotis, Freya L. Sonenstein, Joseph H. Pleck and H. Elizabeth Peters. "How Do Men's Work Lives Change After Fatherhood?." Presented: Ithaca, NY, Cornell Evolving Family Conference on New Data On Fathers, An Examination of Recent Trends in Fatherhood and Father Involvement, September 2006.
4. Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Astone, Nan Marie
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Pathways of Early Fatherhood, Marriage, and Employment: A Latent Class Growth Analysis
Demography 48,2 (May 2011): 593-623.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/8820l65763327583/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Age at First Marriage; Economic Well-Being; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Employment, Youth; Fatherhood; Heterogeneity; Life Course; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), young fathers include heterogeneous subgroups with varying early life pathways in terms of fatherhood timing, the timing of first marriage, and holding full-time employment. Using latent class growth analysis with 10 observations between ages 18 and 37, we derived five latent classes with median ages of first fatherhood below the cohort median (26.4), constituting distinct early fatherhood pathways representing 32.4% of NLSY men: (A) Young Married Fathers, (B) Teen Married Fathers, (C) Young Underemployed Married Fathers, (D) Young Underemployed Single Fathers, and (E) Young Later-Marrying Fathers. A sixth latent class of men who become fathers around the cohort median, following full-time employment and marriage (On-Time On-Sequence Fathers), is the comparison group. With sociodemographic background controlled, all early fatherhood pathways show disadvantage in at least some later-life circumstances (earnings, educational attainment, marital status, and incarceration). The extent of disadvantage is greater when early fatherhood occurs at relatively younger ages (before age 20), occurs outside marriage, or occurs outside full-time employment. The relative disadvantage associated with early fatherhood, unlike early motherhood, increases over the life course.

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Bibliography Citation
Dariotis, Jacinda K., Joseph H. Pleck, Nan Marie Astone and Freya L. Sonenstein. "Pathways of Early Fatherhood, Marriage, and Employment: A Latent Class Growth Analysis." Demography 48,2 (May 2011): 593-623.
5. Hao, Lingxin
Astone, Nan Marie
Cherlin, Andrew J.
Adolescents' Formal Employment and School Enrollment: Effects of State Welfare Policies
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 23,4 (Autumn 2004): 697-721.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pam.20043/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Dropouts; Employment, Youth; High School; High School Dropouts; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Variations in state welfare policies in the reform era may affect adolescents through two mechanisms: A competing labor market hypothesis posits that stringent state welfare policies may reduce adolescent employment; and a signaling hypothesis posits that stringent welfare policies may promote enrollment. To test these hypotheses, we use a dynamic joint model of adolescents' school enrollment and formal employment, separating state welfare policies from non-welfare state policies, state labor market conditions, and unobserved state characteristics. Longitudinal data from the NLSY97 on adolescents aged 14 to 18 and various state data sources over the period 1994-1999 support the competing labor market effect but not the signaling effect. In particular, lower-income dropouts suffer more severely from fewer labor market opportunities when state welfare policies are more stringent, which indicates that welfare reform may compromise work opportunities for lower-income dropouts.
Bibliography Citation
Hao, Lingxin, Nan Marie Astone and Andrew J. Cherlin. "Adolescents' Formal Employment and School Enrollment: Effects of State Welfare Policies." Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 23,4 (Autumn 2004): 697-721.
6. Hao, Lingxin
Cherlin, Andrew J.
Astone, Nan Marie
Adolescents' School Enrollment and Employment: Effect of State Welfare Policies
Working Paper, Labor Market and Employment, Joint Center for Poverty Research, Northwestern University, June 2001.
Also: http://www.northwestern.edu/ipr/jcpr/workingpapers/wpfiles/Hao_Astone_Cherlin.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Joint Center for Poverty Research
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Drug Use; Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); Family Income; GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development; Geocoded Data; High School Dropouts; Human Capital; Labor Market Demographics; Life Course; Neighborhood Effects; Program Participation/Evaluation; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Transition, Welfare to Work; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study hypothesizes that stringent state welfare policies may promote enrollment and reduce employment through four mechanisms taking place in the larger society, the local labor market and the family, particularly for adolescents from low-income families. We conduct a rigorous and robust analysis using a dynamic model and separating out the welfare policies from nonwelfare state policies, youth-specific state labor market conditions, and unobserved state characteristics and period effects. Using longitudinal data from the NLSY97, we have tested the welfare policy effects over a period across welfare waivers and welfare reform (1994-1999) for adolescents aged 14-18. We find that welfare reform may change the behavior of teenage students by encouraging full engagement in schooling and reducing employment while in school. If focusing entirely on schooling is the best way for low-income youth to build human capital, these possible effects of welfare reform could be beneficial. However, if low-income youth obtain "soft skills" from a formal job and if "soft skills" turn out to be decisive for low-income youth's economic future, these welfare policy effects could be harmful. In addition, stringent state welfare policies appear to have a detrimental effect on teenage dropouts from low-income families.
Bibliography Citation
Hao, Lingxin, Andrew J. Cherlin and Nan Marie Astone. "Adolescents' School Enrollment and Employment: Effect of State Welfare Policies." Working Paper, Labor Market and Employment, Joint Center for Poverty Research, Northwestern University, June 2001.
7. Upchurch, Dawn M.
Astone, Nan Marie
McCarthy, James
Influences of Family Background on Adolescent Childbearing: From the 1940s to the 1980s
Presented: Toronto, Canada, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1990
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Childbearing, Adolescent; Fertility; First Birth; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Education; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of this paper is to begin to examine whether or not the influences of background and other characteristics on adolescent childbearing have changed across three birth cohorts of women. Two specific questions were addressed. First, have the effects of background factors on adolescent childbearing changed for women born in the 1930s, the 1950s and the 1960s? Secondly, focusing on the two youngest cohorts of women, the authors develop more fully specified models. The data used for the analysis were obtained from three separate surveys, the NLS of Mature Women, Young Women, and NLSY. The findings suggest that family background factors exert a strong influence across all three cohorts of women, with women from more disadvantaged backgrounds more likely to become adolescent mothers. However, it does appear that some factors, such as family structure may have declined in importance over the period while the effect of mother's education increased over time at least fo r whites. While the models explained more variation and the effects are stronger among whites, the models were remarkably similar for blacks and whites of each cohort. Finally, family background factors were found to be more important predictors of childbearing during younger adolescence than during later adolescence.
Bibliography Citation
Upchurch, Dawn M., Nan Marie Astone and James McCarthy. "Influences of Family Background on Adolescent Childbearing: From the 1940s to the 1980s." Presented: Toronto, Canada, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1990.
8. Weden, Margaret M.
Astone, Nan Marie
Bishai, David M.
Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Differences in Smoking Cessation Associated with Employment and Joblessness Through Young Adulthood in the US
Social Science and Medicine 62,2 (January 2006): 303-316.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953605002911
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Labor Force Participation; Labor Supply; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Racial Differences; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Women

The dynamics of labor force participation and joblessness during young adulthood influence access to social and material resources and shape exposure to different sources of psychosocial strain. Differences in these dynamics by race, ethnicity, and gender are related to changes in a behavioral determinant of poor health (tobacco use) for young adults aging into midlife. Using discrete-time hazards models, we estimate the relationship between labor force participation in the past year and smoking cessation for US adults (ages 14?21 years in 1979) followed in a population-representative sample until 1998 (i.e. the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth). We assess the unique role of racial, ethnic and gender differences in exposure, vulnerability, and reactivity to employment and joblessness by controlling for social and economic resources obtained through working and by controlling for early life factors that select individuals into certain labor force and smoking trajectories. There are three main findings: (1) joblessness is more strongly associated with persistent daily smoking among women than among men; (2) fewer social and economic resources for women out of the labor force compared to employed women explains their lower cessation rates; and (3) lower cessation among unemployed women compared to employed women can only partially be explained by these resources. These findings illustrate how differential access to work-related social and economic resources is an important mediator of poor health trajectories. Contextual factors such as social norms and psychosocial strains at work and at home may play a unique role among European American men and women in explaining gender differences in smoking. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR; Copyright 2006 Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Weden, Margaret M., Nan Marie Astone and David M. Bishai. "Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Differences in Smoking Cessation Associated with Employment and Joblessness Through Young Adulthood in the US." Social Science and Medicine 62,2 (January 2006): 303-316.