Search Results

Author: Cullen, Francis T.
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Hartman, Jennifer L.
Turner, Michael G.
Daigle, Leah E.
Exum, M. Lyn
Cullen, Francis T.
Exploring the Gender Differences in Protective Factors
International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 52,3 (June 2009): 249-277
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Gender Differences; Resilience/Developmental Assets

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Understanding the causes of why individuals desist from or are resilient to delinquency and drug use has become a salient social concern. Much research has centered on the effects that protective factors possess in fostering resiliency but that research has not fully explored how the effects of protective factors might vary across gender. Using a sample of 711 individuals from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, Child-Mother data set, the authors investigate how individual protective factors vary across gender on two measures of resiliency that document the lack of involvement in serious delinquency and drug use. They also examine whether the accumulation of protective factors varies across gender in fostering resiliency. The findings suggest that although males and females rely on different individual protective factors to foster resiliency, the accumulation of protective factors appears to be equally important for males and females in promoting resiliency. The authors discuss theoretical and policy implications. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Hartman, Jennifer L., Michael G. Turner, Leah E. Daigle, M. Lyn Exum and Francis T. Cullen. "Exploring the Gender Differences in Protective Factors." International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 52,3 (June 2009): 249-277.
2. Makarios, Matthew
Cullen, Francis T.
Piquero, Alex R.
Adolescent Criminal Behavior, Population Heterogeneity, and Cumulative Disadvantage: Untangling the Relationship Between Adolescent Delinquency and Negative Outcomes in Emerging Adulthood
Crime and Delinquency 63,6 (June 2017): 683-707.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0011128715572094
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Heterogeneity; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Developmentalists suggest that adolescent criminal involvement encourages later life failure in the social domains of education, welfare, and risky sexual activities. Although prior research supports a link between crime and later life failure, relatively little research has sought to explain why this relationship exists. This research attempts to understand why crime leads to negative social outcomes by testing hypotheses derived from the perspectives of population heterogeneity and cumulative disadvantage. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, the results reveal that net of control variables and measures of population heterogeneity, adolescent criminal behavior consistently predicts school failure, being on welfare, and risky sexual activities. The findings also suggest that after controlling for delinquency, adolescent arrest negatively affects these factors. Furthermore, stable criminal traits and adolescent delinquency interact when predicting measures of poor social adjustment in early adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Makarios, Matthew, Francis T. Cullen and Alex R. Piquero. "Adolescent Criminal Behavior, Population Heterogeneity, and Cumulative Disadvantage: Untangling the Relationship Between Adolescent Delinquency and Negative Outcomes in Emerging Adulthood." Crime and Delinquency 63,6 (June 2017): 683-707.
3. Vander Ven, Thomas Michael
Cullen, Francis T.
The Impact of Maternal Employment on Serious Youth Crime: Does the Quality of Working Conditions Matter?
Crime and Delinquency 50,2 (April 2004): 272-292.
Also: http://cad.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/50/2/272
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: National Council on Crime and Delinquency
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Multilevel; Occupational Status; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Social critics and the general public have for some time voiced a variety of concerns related to the increasing entrance of women into the paid labor market. A popular assumption has been that the children of working women are prone to criminal activity. The authors analyze data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), using multiple regression models to examine whether the occupational status of mothers has criminogenic effects on their children during adolescence and early adulthood (15- to 19-year-olds). After tracing the effects of maternal resources, work hours, and occupational controls to criminality, the authors find that cumulative time spent by mothers in paid employment had no measurable influence on criminal involvement. On the other hand, coercively controlled maternal work over time was related to greater criminal involvement (in their children) in adolescence. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Vander Ven, Thomas Michael and Francis T. Cullen. "The Impact of Maternal Employment on Serious Youth Crime: Does the Quality of Working Conditions Matter? ." Crime and Delinquency 50,2 (April 2004): 272-292.
4. Vander Ven, Thomas Michael
Cullen, Francis T.
Carrozza, Mark A.
Wright, John Paul
Home Alone: The Impact of Maternal Employment on Delinquency
Social Problems 48,2 (May 2001): 236-257.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/sp.2001.48.2.236
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Behavioral Development; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Employment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Mothers

Recently, conservative commentators and parenting experts have been outspoken about the potential negative effects of maternal employment. Specifically, there appears to be a pervasive belief that delinquency is one unfortunate consequence of maternal work. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), we examine whether the occupational status of mothers has criminogenic effects on their children. After tracing the effects of work hours and occupational conditions through risk factors to delinquency, we find that the characteristics of maternal work have relatively little or no influence on delinquency, but do have a slight (and complex) indirect effect through the delinquency pathway 'supervision'. This general pattern holds regardless of whether early maternal employment (i.e., work occurring when children were in the pre-school years) or current maternal employment is considered. Our findings contradict the view that maternal employment causes child behavioral problems.
Bibliography Citation
Vander Ven, Thomas Michael, Francis T. Cullen, Mark A. Carrozza and John Paul Wright. "Home Alone: The Impact of Maternal Employment on Delinquency." Social Problems 48,2 (May 2001): 236-257.
5. Wright, John Paul
Cullen, Francis T.
Parental Efficacy And Delinquent Behavior: Do Control And Support Matter?
Criminology 39,3 (August 2001): 677-705 .
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-9125.2001.tb00937.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Problems; Control; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recently, the concept of "collective efficacy" has been advanced to understand how communities exert control and provide support to reduce crime. In a similar way, we use the concept of "parental efficacy" to highlight the crime reducing effects associated with parents who support and control their youth. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), we examine the inter-relationship between parental controls and supports and their joint influence on youthful misbehavior. The results show that (1) support and control are intertwined, and (2) that parental efficacy exerts substantive effects on adolescent delinquency for the sample as a whole and across varying age groups.

Using data from the 1992 wave of the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), this study examined the interrelationship between parental controls and supports and their joint influence on youthful misbehavior.
Bibliography Citation
Wright, John Paul and Francis T. Cullen. "Parental Efficacy And Delinquent Behavior: Do Control And Support Matter?" Criminology 39,3 (August 2001): 677-705 .
6. Wright, John Paul
Cullen, Francis T.
Williams, Nicolas
The Embeddedness of Adolescent Employment and Participation in Delinquency: A Life Course Perspective
Western Criminology Review 4,1(2002): 1-19.
Also: http://wcr.sonoma.edu/v4n1/wright.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Western Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Behavior, Antisocial; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Employment, Youth; Life Course

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Adolescent penetration into the labor market is a relatively new, and much understudied, phenomena. To date, limited empirical evidence suggests that the extensive employment of adolescents increases their offending. We bring together insights garnered from life-course criminology, which emphasizes the timing of transitional role changes; and economic sociology, which draws attention to the "social embeddedness" of development and decision-making. The objective is to test whether a youth's embeddedness within the labor market has deleterious consequences for the youth's behavior. Our results show that work embeddedness is positively related to delinquency, and that this effect is not accounted for by prior levels of delinquent involvement. These findings were replicated by use of a community sample. In total our findings suggest that being embedded in a work role as a teenager has general deleterious consequences for behavior. Copyright: 2002, The Western Criminology Review.

Sample: Data for this project come from two sources: First, we use the 1988, 1990, and 1992 waves of the children of the (NLSY). Assessment of the development of children born to mothers in the NLSY began in 1986 and has continued at two-year intervals through 1992. The second sample was drawn from eight high schools located in northeast Tennessee (N=436). Although a convenience sample, the data set contains detailed information about the involvement of youths in work and delinquency, as well as measures of work related attitudes and coworker delinquency. Following the lead of Sampson and Groves (1989), we use this sample to validate the measure of work embeddedness derived from the NLSY-Children and to replicate the findings generated from national data.

Bibliography Citation
Wright, John Paul, Francis T. Cullen and Nicolas Williams. "The Embeddedness of Adolescent Employment and Participation in Delinquency: A Life Course Perspective." Western Criminology Review 4,1(2002): 1-19.