Search Results

Author: Vander Ven, Thomas Michael
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Vander Ven, Thomas Michael
Home Alone: The Impact of Maternal Employment on Delinquency
Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Cincinnati, 1998
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Temperament; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Studies; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment

For several decades, social scientists have debated the social impact of the unprecedented number of mothers recently entering the paid workforce. While the majority of studies have found that the children of working mothers are generally no worse off than other children, many Americans continue to be concerned that maternal employment may contribute to behavior problems and delinquency. Although several researchers have investigated the relationship between maternal employment and delinquency, past efforts are limited by narrow conceptualizations of maternal employment and by a preoccupation with maternal supervision and control as the mediating variables between maternal employment and delinquency. With this dissertation, I investigate the maternal employment-delinquency relationship by examining many characteristics of maternal work, such as hours employed and workplace controls, and by considering a wide variety of mediating pathway variables. The impact of both early employment (i.e., maternal work during the child's pre-school years) and current employment (i.e., maternal work during adolescence) is studied through the use of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data. Data on 876 mother and child pairs were used to investigate the connection between maternal employment, family life, and delinquency. Multiple regression techniques were employed to test hypotheses regarding the direct and indirect effects of maternal employment. The general finding of this study is that the characteristics of maternal work have relatively little or no effect on delinquency either directly or indirectly through the family-oriented pathway variables. The results of the analysis showed consistently that regardless of how this issue was examined, having a working mother has only small effects and that those effects are not consistently criminogenic.
Bibliography Citation
Vander Ven, Thomas Michael. Home Alone: The Impact of Maternal Employment on Delinquency. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Cincinnati, 1998.
2. Vander Ven, Thomas Michael
Cullen, Francis T.
The Impact of Maternal Employment on Serious Youth Crime: Does the Quality of Working Conditions Matter?
Crime and Delinquency 50,2 (April 2004): 272-292.
Also: http://cad.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/50/2/272
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: National Council on Crime and Delinquency
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Multilevel; Occupational Status; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Social critics and the general public have for some time voiced a variety of concerns related to the increasing entrance of women into the paid labor market. A popular assumption has been that the children of working women are prone to criminal activity. The authors analyze data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), using multiple regression models to examine whether the occupational status of mothers has criminogenic effects on their children during adolescence and early adulthood (15- to 19-year-olds). After tracing the effects of maternal resources, work hours, and occupational controls to criminality, the authors find that cumulative time spent by mothers in paid employment had no measurable influence on criminal involvement. On the other hand, coercively controlled maternal work over time was related to greater criminal involvement (in their children) in adolescence. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Vander Ven, Thomas Michael and Francis T. Cullen. "The Impact of Maternal Employment on Serious Youth Crime: Does the Quality of Working Conditions Matter? ." Crime and Delinquency 50,2 (April 2004): 272-292.
3. Vander Ven, Thomas Michael
Cullen, Francis T.
Carrozza, Mark A.
Wright, John Paul
Home Alone: The Impact of Maternal Employment on Delinquency
Social Problems 48,2 (May 2001): 236-257.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/sp.2001.48.2.236
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Behavioral Development; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Employment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Mothers

Recently, conservative commentators and parenting experts have been outspoken about the potential negative effects of maternal employment. Specifically, there appears to be a pervasive belief that delinquency is one unfortunate consequence of maternal work. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), we examine whether the occupational status of mothers has criminogenic effects on their children. After tracing the effects of work hours and occupational conditions through risk factors to delinquency, we find that the characteristics of maternal work have relatively little or no influence on delinquency, but do have a slight (and complex) indirect effect through the delinquency pathway 'supervision'. This general pattern holds regardless of whether early maternal employment (i.e., work occurring when children were in the pre-school years) or current maternal employment is considered. Our findings contradict the view that maternal employment causes child behavioral problems.
Bibliography Citation
Vander Ven, Thomas Michael, Francis T. Cullen, Mark A. Carrozza and John Paul Wright. "Home Alone: The Impact of Maternal Employment on Delinquency." Social Problems 48,2 (May 2001): 236-257.