Search Results

Author: Christie-Mizell, C. André
Resulting in 16 citations.
1. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Bullying: The Consequences of Interparental Discord and Child's Self-Concept
Family Process 42,2 (Summer 2003): 237-251.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=10185912&db=aph
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Family Process Inc.
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Violent; Bullying/Victimization; Child Development; Children, School-Age; Family Studies; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parents, Behavior; Self-Perception; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The objective of this research is to explore how the relationship between interparental discord and child's self-concept shapes participation in bullying behavior by elementary and middle-school children. The main finding is that child's self-concept mediates the effects of interparental discord on bullying behavior. Further, the results of the study support a symbolic interactionist view of child self-development, in which children internalize the environment provided by parents. This internalization gives way to self-concept, which guides behavior. This study adds to the growing body of literature that seeks to understand whether and how characteristics of children mediate the effects of parental attributes on behavioral outcomes. The proposed implications for the prevention of bullying include building children's self-concept, intervening in parental conflict, and involving the entire family system in the intervention process. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André. "Bullying: The Consequences of Interparental Discord and Child's Self-Concept." Family Process 42,2 (Summer 2003): 237-251.
2. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Family Income on Child and Adolescent Bullying
Sociological Focus 37,1 (February 2004): 25-41
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: North Central Sociological Association ==> Routledge (new in 2012)
Keyword(s): Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Problems; Bullying/Victimization; Income Level; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Utilizing data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Mother and Child Samples, I investigate the relationship between bullying behavior & family income. I test the hypothesis that the relationship between bullying & socioeconomic status is curvilinear, with children from low & high-income families engaging in higher levels of bullying than those from middle-income families. Further, within the proposed U-shaped relationship between bullying & family income, I examine whether children from low-income families bully more than those from high-income families. As expected, there is a curvilinear relationship between bullying & income. While low-income youth are at greatest risk for engaging in bullying, those youth at the upper end of the income gradient also have a higher propensity for participating in bullying behavior, compared to their more moderate-income counterparts. Although levels of bullying behavior decrease over time at both the lower & upper ends of the income gradient, strong curvilinear associations between bullying & family income exist both in cross-sectional & longitudinal analyses. Further, child's age, school standing, & the amount of emotional support offered to the child are important factors in the initiation of bullying & in whether the behavior persists over time.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André. "Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Family Income on Child and Adolescent Bullying." Sociological Focus 37,1 (February 2004): 25-41.
3. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Racial Variation in the Effects of Sons versus Daughters on the Disruption of the First Marriage
Journal of Divorce and Remarriage 38,3-4 (2003): 41-60.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J087v38n03_03
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Divorce; Gender Differences; Marital Disruption; Marriage; Preschool Children; Racial Differences; Siblings; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This research investigates whether there is racial variation in how the gender composition of the sibling group impacts the probability of divorce among couples in their first marriage. For African American families, the effect of children's sex is mediated by socioeconomic status. However, with regard to Whites, the number of sons heightens the probability of divorce, while daughters have no effect on the marital union. Other sibling group characteristics are pivotal to predicting the likelihood of divorce regardless of race. The presence of preschool children in the home is negatively related to divorce, and the age range of the sibling group is inversely associated with marital disruption. (PsycINFO Database Record 2003 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André. "Racial Variation in the Effects of Sons versus Daughters on the Disruption of the First Marriage." Journal of Divorce and Remarriage 38,3-4 (2003): 41-60.
4. Christie-Mizell, C. André
The Effects of Traditional Family and Gender Ideology on Earnings: Race and Gender Differences
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 27,1 (April 2006): 48-71.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/n0154055336j20x8/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Earnings; Economics of Gender; Economics of Minorities; Family Studies; Gender Differences; Labor Market Demographics; Racial Differences; Wages, Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite increasing gains in labor market opportunities, women and racial minorities earn less than their white male counterparts. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study explores racial and gender variation in how family and gender ideology shape this wage gap. The findings reveal that traditional role attitudes reduce earnings for African American men, African American women, and white women. However, white women experience the largest threat to wages as a result of conventional gender ideology. Further, the number of children and the timing of childbearing are detrimental to black and white women's earnings, while neither of these factors hampers men's earnings.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André. "The Effects of Traditional Family and Gender Ideology on Earnings: Race and Gender Differences." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 27,1 (April 2006): 48-71.
5. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Erickson, Rebecca J.
Mothers And Mastery: The Consequences Of Perceived Neighborhood Disorder
Social Psychology Quarterly 70,4 (December 2007): 340-365.
Also: http://spq.sagepub.com/content/70/4/340.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Mothers; Neighborhood Effects; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Racial Differences; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of mothers, we specify the conditions under which the neighborhood context shapes the experience of mastery. In so doing, we extend the work of others who have shown that neighborhood perceptions influence one's sense of personal control over and above the effects of sociodemographic and objective neighborhood characteristics. Specifically, we demonstrate that the benefits to mastery generally afforded to mothers through marital status, household income, physical health, and living in a higher-income neighborhood are diluted by perceptions of neighborhood disorder. These findings suggest the importance of including measures of proximal experiences when attempting to link objective components of social structure with individual and family-level outcomes. Providing further support for the emphasis placed on these proximate mechanisms by the social structure and personality framework, our analyses indicate that failing to consider negative community perceptions suppresses the significant impact that central city residence and race have on mothers' sense of personal control.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André and Rebecca J. Erickson. "Mothers And Mastery: The Consequences Of Perceived Neighborhood Disorder." Social Psychology Quarterly 70,4 (December 2007): 340-365.
6. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Keil, Jacqueline M.
Laske, Mary Therese
Stewart, Jennifer
Bullying Behavior, Parents’ Work Hours and Early Adolescents’ Perceptions of Time Spent With Parents
Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1570-1595.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/43/4/1570.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Bullying/Victimization; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Interaction; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates the relationships among bullying behavior, mother’s and father’s work hours, and early adolescents’ perceptions of whether they spend sufficient time with their parents. In cross-sectional models, we find maternal work hours are modestly associated with increases in bullying behavior. However, in more rigorous change models, our findings indicate that over time maternal work hours bear no direct relationship to bullying behavior. Moreover, in our final models, an interaction between father’s work hours and perceptions of time spent with him has one of the most robust associations with bullying for adolescents. When paternal employment is full- or overtime and youth perceive they do not spend enough with their fathers, bullying behavior increases. Other important factors that shape bullying behavior are the quality of the home environment and the adolescent’s school performance.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Jacqueline M. Keil, Mary Therese Laske and Jennifer Stewart. "Bullying Behavior, Parents’ Work Hours and Early Adolescents’ Perceptions of Time Spent With Parents." Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1570-1595.
7. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Keil, Jacqueline M.
Stewart, Jennifer
Pryor, Erin M.
Child and Adolescent Bullying Behavior: Parents' Work Hours and Children's Perceptions of Time
Presented: Boston MA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, July 2008
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Bullying/Victimization; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Interaction; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates the relationships among bullying behavior, mother’s and father’s work hours, and early adolescents’ perceptions of whether they spend sufficient time with their parents. In cross-sectional models, we find maternal work hours are modestly associated with increases in bullying behavior. However, in more rigorous change models, our findings indicate that over time maternal work hours bear no direct relationship to bullying behavior. Moreover, in our final models, an interaction between father’s work hours and perceptions of time spent with him has one of the most robust associations with bullying for adolescents. When paternal employment is full- or overtime and youth perceive they do not spend enough with their fathers, bullying behavior increases. Other important factors that shape bullying behavior are the quality of the home environment and the adolescent’s school performance.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Jacqueline M. Keil, Jennifer Stewart and Erin M. Pryor. "Child and Adolescent Bullying Behavior: Parents' Work Hours and Children's Perceptions of Time." Presented: Boston MA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, July 2008.
8. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Peralta, Robert L.
Multiple Roles and Alcohol Consumption in the Transition to Adulthood
Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Attitudes; Employment; Family Influences; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Gender Differences; Marriage; Parenthood; Social Roles; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Utilizing data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - Young Adult sample (N=1,494), we investigated whether gender role orientation and the initiation of three adult roles (i.e., employment, marriage and parenthood) explain the higher levels of alcohol consumed by men. Gender differences in the amount of alcohol consumption during the transition to adulthood is explained by the number of roles occupied by the individual, but not necessarily by any single role or role combination. Role accumulation protects women from drinking, but does not have an impact on male drinking behavior. Our findings also indicated that, as youth mature, traditional gender role orientation is related to lower levels of drinking for both men and women, but is mediated by marriage. Finally, parenthood was the one adulthood transition that significantly decreased drinking for both men and women.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André and Robert L. Peralta. "Multiple Roles and Alcohol Consumption in the Transition to Adulthood." Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2013.
9. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Peralta, Robert L.
The Gender Gap in Alcohol Consumption during Late Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Gendered Attitudes and Adult Roles
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,4 (December 2009): 410-426.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/50/4/410.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Employment; Family Influences; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Gender Differences; Genetics; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Marriage; Parenthood; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We utilize data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth young adult sample (N = 1,488) to investigate whether gender role attitudes and the occupation of and transition to three adult roles (i.e., employment, marriage, and parenthood) contribute to the maintenance of the gender gap in the frequency and quantity of alcohol use. Our results indicate that traditional gender role attitudes are related to less frequent drinking for both men and women, but role attitudes are not associated with the number of drinks consumed. We also find that employment and transitions to employment increase the frequency and quantity of drinking, but less so for women compared to men. Furthermore, marriage, parenthood, and transitions to parenthood are related to less frequent drinking for women only. In terms of the number of drinks consumed, only employment and transitions to employment distinguish men and women. Employment is related to increased quantity of drinking for men, but decreased drinking for women, while transitions to employment have no effect on men, but do decrease the amount of drinking for women. Marriage decreases the number of drinks consumed equally for both men and women. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André and Robert L. Peralta. "The Gender Gap in Alcohol Consumption during Late Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Gendered Attitudes and Adult Roles." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,4 (December 2009): 410-426.
10. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Pryor, Erin M.
Grossman, Elizabeth R.B.
Child Depressive Symptoms, Spanking, and Emotional Support: Differences Between African American and European American Youth
Family Relations 57,3 (July 2008): 335-350.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20456797
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Depression (see also CESD); Discipline; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parenting Skills/Styles; Punishment, Corporal; Racial Differences

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth—Mother and Child samples, we explored the relationships among child and adolescent depressive symptoms, spanking, and emotional support offered to youth. We present cross-sectional and change models for both African Americans and European Americans. Findings showed that regardless of race, spanking is associated with more depressive symptoms in the cross-sectional analysis but does not appear to maintain this relationship over time. With regard to emotional support, depressive symptoms for African American youth are inversely related to the emotional support their mothers provide for them in cross-sectional models, but the benefit does not persist in our change models. For European American children and adolescents, emotional support is associated with fewer depressive symptoms in the short term and over time. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Family Relations is the property of Blackwell Publishing Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Erin M. Pryor and Elizabeth R.B. Grossman. "Child Depressive Symptoms, Spanking, and Emotional Support: Differences Between African American and European American Youth ." Family Relations 57,3 (July 2008): 335-350.
11. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Steelman, Lala Carr
Stewart, Jennifer
Seeing Their Surroundings: The Effects of Neighborhood Setting and Race on Maternal Distress
Social Science Research 32,3 (September 2003): 402-429.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=10425007&db=aph
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Family Structure; Household Income; Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Differences; Rural/Urban Differences

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth at two points in time, we examine the relationship between maternal psychological distress and perceived neighborhood disorder for three groups: African Americans, Mexican Americans and whites. Findings show that across all racial groups neighborhood perceptions are more salient in shaping levels of distress than is objective neighborhood location. However, objective location (e.g., central city residence) does considerably influence how mothers perceive their neighborhoods in the first place. These results suggest that future research on the independent consequences of the neighborhood context should incorporate both subjective assessments and objective indicators of living arrangements. We also observe that perceived neighborhood disorder and psychological distress are affected by marital status, educational attainment, household income, and employment. Moreover, compared to their Mexican American and white counterparts, family structure (e.g., number of children) appears to be more detrimental in shaping outcomes for African American mothers. [Copyright 2003 Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Lala Carr Steelman and Jennifer Stewart. "Seeing Their Surroundings: The Effects of Neighborhood Setting and Race on Maternal Distress." Social Science Research 32,3 (September 2003): 402-429.
12. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Talbert, Ryan D.
Hope, Ashleigh Rene
Frazier, Cleothia G.
Hearne, Brittany Nicole
Depression and African Americans in the First Decade of Midlife: The Consequences of Social Roles and Gender
Journal of the National Medical Association published online (10 November 2018): DOI: 10.1016/j.jnma.2018.10.012.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002796841830316X
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Depression (see also CESD); Employment; Marital Status; Parenthood

Objective: This study examined gender differences in how three social roles -- marriage, parenthood, and employment -- impact depressive symptoms and clinically significant depression for African Americans in the first decade of midlife, from 40 to 50 years old. Specifically, we sought to understand the associations between roles configurations (e.g., married parent versus employed only) and depressed mood as well as diagnosable depression.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Ryan D. Talbert, Ashleigh Rene Hope, Cleothia G. Frazier and Brittany Nicole Hearne. "Depression and African Americans in the First Decade of Midlife: The Consequences of Social Roles and Gender." Journal of the National Medical Association published online (10 November 2018): DOI: 10.1016/j.jnma.2018.10.012.
13. Keil, Jacqueline M.
Christie-Mizell, C. André
Beliefs, Fertility, and Earnings of African American, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White Mothers.
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 30,3 (1 August 2008): 299-323.
Also: http://hjb.sagepub.com/content/30/3/299.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Black Studies; Earnings; Fertility; Gender; Hispanics; Mothers, Income; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study explores gender ideology, fertility factors (e.g., age at first birth, number of children), and their effects on earnings of African American (n = 413), Hispanic American (n = 271), and White (n = 817) mothers. An analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth over a 10-year period (1988 to 1998) shows that, on average, Hispanic American and White mothers have a significantly more conservative gender ideology than African American mothers. Nevertheless, a conservative gender ideology significantly reduces African American, Hispanic American, and White mothers' earnings when controlling for a variety of important labor force factors. Regarding fertility, the number of children is detrimental to the earnings of White mothers but has no effect on African American or Hispanic mothers in the sample. Although early childbearing significantly depresses the earnings of African American and Hispanic mothers, it does not do so for their White counterparts. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Keil, Jacqueline M. and C. André Christie-Mizell. "Beliefs, Fertility, and Earnings of African American, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White Mothers." Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 30,3 (1 August 2008): 299-323.
14. Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Christie-Mizell, C. André
Depressed Mood and Body Weight
Youth and Society 41,4 (June 2010): 503-518.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/41/4/503.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 1994-1998 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth merged Mother and Young Adult file, this article examines the relationship between depressive symptoms and body mass index (BMI) in adolescence. The authors also examine whether this relationship varies by race and gender. Their findings indicate that over a 4-year period symptoms of depression are only related to increases in BMI for African American females. Stepfamily arrangements and poor neighborhood quality were more related to higher body mass index among White females. With the exception of household income predicting higher weight for African American males, their models were not very predictive for either African American or White males. They interpret their results within a family stress framework. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Youth & Society is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori and C. André Christie-Mizell. "Depressed Mood and Body Weight." Youth and Society 41,4 (June 2010): 503-518.
15. Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Christie-Mizell, C. André
Depression and Adolescent Overweight: Exploring Race Differences
Presented: Montreal, Quebec, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2006
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Family Structure; Gender Differences; Neighborhood Effects; Obesity; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 1994-1998 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth merged Mother and Young Adult file, this paper examines the relationship between depression and overweight in adolescence. We also examine whether this relationship varies by race and gender. Our findings indicate that over a four year period that depression is only related to increases in weight for African American females. Step-family arrangements and poor neighborhood quality were more related to weight gain among white females. With the exception of household income predicting higher weight for African American males, our models were not very predictive for either African American or white males.
Bibliography Citation
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori and C. André Christie-Mizell. "Depression and Adolescent Overweight: Exploring Race Differences." Presented: Montreal, Quebec, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2006.
16. Tyndall, Benjamin D.
Christie-Mizell, C. André
Mastery, Homeownership, and Adult Roles During the Transition to Adulthood
Sociological Inquiry 86,1 (February 2016): 5-28.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/soin.12099/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Employment; Home Ownership; Marriage; Parenthood; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We investigate the relationship between homeownership and personal sense of mastery in the transition to adulthood and examine whether three important adult transitions (employment, marriage/cohabitation, and parenthood) moderate the impact of homeownership on mastery. Utilizing the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth--Young Adult Sample (N = 1,609), we estimate change models to assess the direct effects of homeownership on mastery as well as whether this impact is modified by the transition to adult roles. Homeownership increases the sense of mastery among young adults. Homeowners who are unemployed paradoxically receive a boost to mastery not experienced by those who are employed, and homeowners who are parents experience increased mastery, compared to those who do not have children. Owning a home has a positive influence on young adults' sense of mastery during a period when their mastery is in flux and they are accumulating new roles.
Bibliography Citation
Tyndall, Benjamin D. and C. André Christie-Mizell. "Mastery, Homeownership, and Adult Roles During the Transition to Adulthood." Sociological Inquiry 86,1 (February 2016): 5-28.