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Author: Keil, Jacqueline M.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Keil, Jacqueline M.
Laske, Mary Therese
Stewart, Jennifer
Bullying Behavior, Parents’ Work Hours and Early Adolescents’ Perceptions of Time Spent With Parents
Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1570-1595.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/43/4/1570.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Bullying/Victimization; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Interaction; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates the relationships among bullying behavior, mother’s and father’s work hours, and early adolescents’ perceptions of whether they spend sufficient time with their parents. In cross-sectional models, we find maternal work hours are modestly associated with increases in bullying behavior. However, in more rigorous change models, our findings indicate that over time maternal work hours bear no direct relationship to bullying behavior. Moreover, in our final models, an interaction between father’s work hours and perceptions of time spent with him has one of the most robust associations with bullying for adolescents. When paternal employment is full- or overtime and youth perceive they do not spend enough with their fathers, bullying behavior increases. Other important factors that shape bullying behavior are the quality of the home environment and the adolescent’s school performance.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Jacqueline M. Keil, Mary Therese Laske and Jennifer Stewart. "Bullying Behavior, Parents’ Work Hours and Early Adolescents’ Perceptions of Time Spent With Parents." Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1570-1595.
2. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Keil, Jacqueline M.
Stewart, Jennifer
Pryor, Erin M.
Child and Adolescent Bullying Behavior: Parents' Work Hours and Children's Perceptions of Time
Presented: Boston MA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, July 2008
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Bullying/Victimization; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Interaction; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates the relationships among bullying behavior, mother’s and father’s work hours, and early adolescents’ perceptions of whether they spend sufficient time with their parents. In cross-sectional models, we find maternal work hours are modestly associated with increases in bullying behavior. However, in more rigorous change models, our findings indicate that over time maternal work hours bear no direct relationship to bullying behavior. Moreover, in our final models, an interaction between father’s work hours and perceptions of time spent with him has one of the most robust associations with bullying for adolescents. When paternal employment is full- or overtime and youth perceive they do not spend enough with their fathers, bullying behavior increases. Other important factors that shape bullying behavior are the quality of the home environment and the adolescent’s school performance.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Jacqueline M. Keil, Jennifer Stewart and Erin M. Pryor. "Child and Adolescent Bullying Behavior: Parents' Work Hours and Children's Perceptions of Time." Presented: Boston MA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, July 2008.
3. Keil, Jacqueline M.
Christie-Mizell, C. André
Beliefs, Fertility, and Earnings of African American, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White Mothers.
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 30,3 (1 August 2008): 299-323.
Also: http://hjb.sagepub.com/content/30/3/299.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Black Studies; Earnings; Fertility; Gender; Hispanics; Mothers, Income; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study explores gender ideology, fertility factors (e.g., age at first birth, number of children), and their effects on earnings of African American (n = 413), Hispanic American (n = 271), and White (n = 817) mothers. An analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth over a 10-year period (1988 to 1998) shows that, on average, Hispanic American and White mothers have a significantly more conservative gender ideology than African American mothers. Nevertheless, a conservative gender ideology significantly reduces African American, Hispanic American, and White mothers' earnings when controlling for a variety of important labor force factors. Regarding fertility, the number of children is detrimental to the earnings of White mothers but has no effect on African American or Hispanic mothers in the sample. Although early childbearing significantly depresses the earnings of African American and Hispanic mothers, it does not do so for their White counterparts. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Keil, Jacqueline M. and C. André Christie-Mizell. "Beliefs, Fertility, and Earnings of African American, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White Mothers." Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 30,3 (1 August 2008): 299-323.