Search Results

Author: Frazier, Cleothia G.
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Talbert, Ryan D.
Frazier, Cleothia G.
Rainock, Meagan R.
Jurinsky, Jordan
Race-Gender Variation in the Relationship between Arrest History and Poor Health from Adolescence to Adulthood
Journal of the National Medical Association (23 March 2022): DOI: 10.1016/j.jnma.2022.02.013.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0027968422000487
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Arrests; Criminal Justice System; Gender Differences; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Racial Differences

Objective: The objective of this study is to examine how criminal justice involvement, specifically arrests, shapes health by race-gender status and age for Black, Latinx, and White men and women from adolescence to adulthood.

Method: Data were from sixteen waves (1997-2013) of data of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (N = 7,674). Respondents were 12-16 years during the first wave of the survey. Multivariate logistic regression with interactions were used to determine how age and race-gender status shape the association between poor health and arrests over time.

Results: With the exception of Black men, arrest history is positively associated with the probability of poor health and this relationship strengthens with age. Arrests have the least detrimental impact on the health of Black men. For those without an arrest history, the probability of poor health also increases with age, but with a less steep incline over time than those who have been arrested. Overall, women who have been arrested, regardless of race, have the worst health prospects.

Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Ryan D. Talbert, Cleothia G. Frazier, Meagan R. Rainock and Jordan Jurinsky. "Race-Gender Variation in the Relationship between Arrest History and Poor Health from Adolescence to Adulthood." Journal of the National Medical Association (23 March 2022): DOI: 10.1016/j.jnma.2022.02.013.
2. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Talbert, Ryan D.
Hearne, Brittany Nicole
Frazier, Cleothia G.
Hope, Ashleigh Rene
Piatt, Elizabeth E.
Gender Variation in Depressive Symptoms and Multiple Roles during the First Decade of Midlife
Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Social Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study investigated the relationship between social roles (marriage, employment, parenthood) and depressive symptoms and whether role accumulation (number of roles) versus specific role configurations (e.g., married parent) matter more for mental health by gender. Method: Utilizing data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N=7,614), we estimated depressive symptoms with regression models during the first decade of midlife -- from 40 to 50 years old. Results: The relationship between role accumulation and depressive symptoms is curvilinear, with the decrease in depressive symptoms flattening at higher numbers of roles. Role configurations that include employment (e.g., married and employed) produced the lowest levels of depressive symptoms for both women and men. Discussion: Social roles were generally good for mental health at midlife, but role gains and losses were more detrimental for women. Role configurations that did not include employment (e.g., parent only) increase depressive symptoms more for men than women.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Ryan D. Talbert, Brittany Nicole Hearne, Cleothia G. Frazier, Ashleigh Rene Hope and Elizabeth E. Piatt. "Gender Variation in Depressive Symptoms and Multiple Roles during the First Decade of Midlife." Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2019.
3. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Talbert, Ryan D.
Hope, Ashleigh Rene
Frazier, Cleothia G.
Hearne, Brittany Nicole
Depression and African Americans in the First Decade of Midlife: The Consequences of Social Roles and Gender
Journal of the National Medical Association 111,3 (June 2019): 285-295.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002796841830316X
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Depression (see also CESD); Employment; Marital Status; Parenthood

Objective: This study examined gender differences in how three social roles -- marriage, parenthood, and employment -- impact depressive symptoms and clinically significant depression for African Americans in the first decade of midlife, from 40 to 50 years old. Specifically, we sought to understand the associations between roles configurations (e.g., married parent versus employed only) and depressed mood as well as diagnosable depression.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Ryan D. Talbert, Ashleigh Rene Hope, Cleothia G. Frazier and Brittany Nicole Hearne. "Depression and African Americans in the First Decade of Midlife: The Consequences of Social Roles and Gender." Journal of the National Medical Association 111,3 (June 2019): 285-295.
4. Frazier, Cleothia G.
Social Integration During Midlife and Beyond: An Examination of How Social Roles and Work Affect Sleep
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Vanderbilt University, 2021.
Also: https://ir.vanderbilt.edu/handle/1803/16643
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Vanderbilt University
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Shift Workers; Sleep; Social Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Current research increasingly shows that sleep is an important factor that is associated with a variety of health and well-being outcomes. Guided by role theory, stress process, the life course perspective, and intersectionality, this three-paper dissertation examines how one's attachment to society through social roles and work have implications for sleep health among adults during mid to late life. Paper One uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort (NLSY79) (N=3,364), to examine the effect of social roles on sleep duration and sleep quality at age 50. Two competing hypotheses are tested -- role strain (i.e., multiple roles harm health) and role enhancement (i.e., multiple roles benefit health). Variation by race-gender group status is also investigated. Findings show support for both role strain and role enhancement. There is also evidence that role accumulation is associated with a larger reduction in sleep quality for White men, compared to Black men and women. Paper Two also uses the NLSY79 (N=5,652) to investigate the associations between shift work, depressive symptoms, and self-rated health. This study also considers whether sleep mediates these associations. The results show that working a non-day shift increases the odds of reporting poor self-rated health, but not depressive symptoms. The effect of shift work on depressive symptoms is mediated by hours of sleep during the week and insomnia, but only insomnia mediates the association between shift work and poor self-rated health. Paper Three examines how labor force status and transitions to retirement affect insomnia in older adults. Data used for this study are from waves 2006 and 2014 of the Health and Retirement Study (N=8,556). Findings show that older adults who are retired and who transitioned from part-time to retirement experience increased insomnia compared full-time workers. Moderating effects are found for Black and White women. These findings contribute to a sociological understanding of sleep by elucidating that societal integration contributes to and maintains stratified hierarchies that influence differences in sleep health for adults in midlife and older ages.
Bibliography Citation
Frazier, Cleothia G. Social Integration During Midlife and Beyond: An Examination of How Social Roles and Work Affect Sleep. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Vanderbilt University, 2021..
5. Frazier, Cleothia G.
Working Around The Clock: The Effect of Shift Work and Sleep on Depressive Symptoms
Innovation in Aging 6, S_1 (November 2022): 655.
Also: https://doi.org/10.1093/geroni/igac059.2417
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Shift Workers; Sleep

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

To expand prior research that reveal the independent effects of shift work and sleep on mental health, this study focuses on the interconnection between shift work, sleep, and depressive symptoms. Guided by the Stress Process Model (SPM), I examine the association between shift work and depressive symptoms and investigate whether sleep duration, sleep quality (insomnia symptoms), and sleep latency (the time it takes to fall asleep) mediate this relationship. Data was drawn from the age 50 health module of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort. The sample consisted of noninstitutionalized adults aged 51-60 (N=5,386). Findings show that shift workers had increased odds of short sleep, insomnia symptoms, and increased sleep latency compared to non-shift workers. Moreover, shift work was associated with increased depressive symptoms. However, part of the effect of shift work on depressive symptoms was indirect, operating through sleep. Specifically, short sleep during the week and on the weekend as well as insomnia symptoms mediated the relationship between shift work and depressive symptoms.
Bibliography Citation
Frazier, Cleothia G. "Working Around The Clock: The Effect of Shift Work and Sleep on Depressive Symptoms." Innovation in Aging 6, S_1 (November 2022): 655.