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Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Besen, Elyssa
Pransky, Glenn
Trajectories of Productivity Loss over a 20-year Period: An Analysis of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health 40,4 (July 2014): 380-389.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/43188032
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Nordic Association of Occupational Safety and Health (NOROSH)
Keyword(s): Disability; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Modeling, Latent Class Analysis/Latent Transition Analysis

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: We investigated multiple trajectories of the probability of reporting health-related productivity loss over a 20-year period among adults aged 25-44 years and explored differences among the trajectories in demographic and personal characteristics and employment outcomes in midlife.

Methods: A latent class growth analysis of health-related productivity loss was estimated on 12 waves of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) (N= 5699), an ongoing nationally representative longitudinal survey of Americans. Waves 1-5 were collected annually at ages 25-29 years. Waves 6-12 were collected biennially at ages 30-44 years. Productivity loss was measured as "health fully preventing a person from working" or "health limiting the amount or kind of work a person could do." Differences among trajectories were assessed using analyses of variance (ANOVA) and Chi-square tests.

Results: A five-group trajectory model for productivity loss was identified: (i) no risk, (ii) low risk, (iii) high risk, (iv) increasing risk at early ages, and (v) increasing risk at later ages. At the first wave, after the waves used for the trajectory model in which respondents were approximately age 45 years, the no-and low-risk groups worked the most weeks and hours per week and had the highest percentages of participants employed ≥10 weeks compared to the high-risk and early-/late-onset increasing-risk groups, all of which had the lowest levels of mastery, self-esteem, education, and socioeconomic status.

Conclusions: There are several developmental patterns of productivity loss, with some trajectories being associated with lower work participation in midlife. These high risk patterns may be indicative of individuals needing intervention to prevent premature work withdrawal.

Bibliography Citation
Besen, Elyssa and Glenn Pransky. "Trajectories of Productivity Loss over a 20-year Period: An Analysis of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health 40,4 (July 2014): 380-389.
2. Dembe, Allard E.
Erickson, J. Bianca
Delbos, Rachel G.
Banks, Steven M.
Nonstandard Shift Schedules and the Risk of Job-Related Injuries
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health 32,3 (June 2006): 232-340.
Also: http://www.sjweh.fi/show_abstract.php?abstract_id=1004
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland
Keyword(s): Injuries; Job Characteristics; Job Hazards; Job Satisfaction; Occupations; Shift Workers; Variables, Independent - Covariate; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the extent to which working various types of nonstandard shift schedules (e.g., night and evening shifts) is associated with the risk of occupational injuries or illnesses.

METHODS: Multivariate analyses were conducted using data from 13 years (1987 to 2000) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) encompassing 110 236 job records and over 82 000 person-years of work experience. Cox proportional hazard regression techniques were used to derive hazard ratios comparing the relative risk of suffering a work-related injury among people working night, evening, rotating, split, and irregular shifts to the risks for those working conventional day shifts, after adjustment for age, gender, occupation, industry, and region. Incidence rates were normalized using a common denominator of 100 person-years of "at-risk time" to obtain valid comparisons.

RESULTS: All of the nonstandard shift schedules, except split shifts, were found to have a higher risk for occupational injuries and illnesses than conventional day shifts. After control for the selected covariates, the calculated hazard ratios were 1.43 for evening shifts [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.26-1.62], 1.36 for rotating shifts (95% CI 1.17-1.58), 1.30 for night shifts (95% CI 1.12-1.52), 1.15 for irregular shifts (1.03-1.30), and 1.06 for split shifts (0.71-1.58).

CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that nonstandard shifts are not more risky merely because of the concentration of hazardous jobs in those types of schedules or because of underlying differences in the characteristics of employees working nonstandard shifts. The results point to the need to extend targeted injury prevention programs not only to people working night shifts, but also to those who work evenings.

Bibliography Citation
Dembe, Allard E., J. Bianca Erickson, Rachel G. Delbos and Steven M. Banks. "Nonstandard Shift Schedules and the Risk of Job-Related Injuries." Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health 32,3 (June 2006): 232-340.
3. Dong, Xiuwen
Long Workhours, Work Scheduling and Work Related Injuries Among Construction Workers in the United States
Scandinavian Journal of work, Environment and Health 31,5 (October 2005): 329-335.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16273958&query_hl=11&itool=pubmed_docsum
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland
Keyword(s): Injuries; Job Turnover; Shift Workers; Work Hours; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were (i) to examine work scheduling in construction and (ii) to establish whether there is any connection between workhours and safety outcomes among construction workers. METHODS: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort (NLSY79), was used for the data analysis. Odds ratios were used to measure the risk of work-related injury in different worker groups. RESULTS: The findings showed that (i) construction workers started work earlier, worked longer days and fewer weeks a year, and were more likely to hold multiple jobs and change jobs than their nonconstruction counterparts and (ii) long workhours and irregular work schedules were significantly associated with a higher work-related injury rate after control for possible confounders. CONCLUSION: The results provide evidence that overtime and irregular work scheduling have an adverse effect on worker safety.
Bibliography Citation
Dong, Xiuwen. "Long Workhours, Work Scheduling and Work Related Injuries Among Construction Workers in the United States ." Scandinavian Journal of work, Environment and Health 31,5 (October 2005): 329-335.
4. Kim, Daniel
Does Paid Vacation Leave Protect Against Depression among Working Americans? A National Longitudinal Fixed Effects Analysis
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health published online (7 November 2018): DOI: doi:10.5271/sjweh.3751.
Also: http://www.sjweh.fi/show_abstract.php?abstract_id=3751
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Nordic Association of Occupational Safety and Health (NOROSH)
Keyword(s): Benefits; Depression (see also CESD); Modeling, Fixed Effects

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The United States is the only advanced economy globally that does not guarantee its workers paid vacation leave. Although empirical studies have linked paid vacation leave to happiness and stress, no study has investigated the association between paid vacation leave and depression. Using a nationally-representative longitudinal sample of 3380 working men and women aged 45-52 years from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this study explored whether paid vacation leave may protect against depression.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Daniel. "Does Paid Vacation Leave Protect Against Depression among Working Americans? A National Longitudinal Fixed Effects Analysis." Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health published online (7 November 2018): DOI: doi:10.5271/sjweh.3751.
5. Lin, Tin-Chi
Verma, S.K.
Courtney, T.K.
Does Obesity Contribute to Non-fatal Occupational Injury? Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health 39,3 (2013): 268-275.
Also: http://www.sjweh.fi/show_issue.php?issue_id=299
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Nordic Association of Occupational Safety and Health (NOROSH)
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Injuries, Workplace; Obesity; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives The relationship between obesity and occupational injuries remains unclear in the literature due to limitations in study design and sample composition. To better assess the contribution of obesity to occupational injury, we used data from a nationally representative cohort, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) in 1988–2000. Methods We hypothesized that obesity contributes to workplace injury and tested the hypothesis using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE) and random-effects logistic regression. To ensure temporal precedence of obesity, we used the obesity level in each previous wave and examined its association with injury outcome in each wave from 1988–2000. Obesity was measured as body mass index (BMI) based on self-reported height and weight. Results The GEE analysis showed that obesity was associated with 25% higher odds of workplace injury [odds ratio (OR) 1.25, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.12–1.39; P<0.001). The random-effects regression indicated that obese workers were associated with 29% higher odds of sustaining injuries than those of normal weight (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.15–1.45; P<0.001). Conclusions Obesity may predispose workers to work-related injury; further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms.
Bibliography Citation
Lin, Tin-Chi, S.K. Verma and T.K. Courtney. "Does Obesity Contribute to Non-fatal Occupational Injury? Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health 39,3 (2013): 268-275.