Search Results

Author: Kim, Daniel
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Dev, Saloni
Kim, Daniel
State-Level Income Inequality and County-Level Social Capital in Relation to Individual-Level Depression in Middle-Aged Adults: A Lagged Multilevel Study
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17 (27 July 2020): 5386.
Also: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/15/5386
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Depression (see also CESD); Geocoded Data; Income Level; Social Capital; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the US, the incidence of depression and suicide have followed escalating trends over the past several years. These trends call for greater efforts towards identifying their underlying drivers and finding effective prevention strategies and treatments. One social determinant of health that plausibly influences the risk of depression is income inequality, the gap between the rich and poor. However, research on this association is still sparse. We used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and the US Census to investigate the multilevel lagged associations of state-level income inequality with the individual-level odds of depression in middle-aged adults, controlling for state- and individual-level factors. We also examined the independent associations of county-level social capital with depression and explored whether it mediated the income inequality relationship. Higher income inequality at the state level predicted higher odds of individual-level depression nearly 2 decades later [OR for middle vs. lowest tertile of income inequality = 1.35 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.76), OR for highest vs. lowest tertile = 1.34 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.78)]. This association was stronger among men than women. Furthermore, there was evidence that county-level social capital independently predicted depression and that it mediated the income inequality association. Overall, our findings suggest that policies attenuating levels of income inequality at the US state level and that leverage social capital may protect against one's likelihood of developing depression.
Bibliography Citation
Dev, Saloni and Daniel Kim. "State-Level Income Inequality and County-Level Social Capital in Relation to Individual-Level Depression in Middle-Aged Adults: A Lagged Multilevel Study." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17 (27 July 2020): 5386.
2. Gero, Krisztina
Kim, Daniel
Prospective Associations between US State-level Corruption and Individual-level Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Middle-aged Americans: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youths 1979
International Journal of Public Health published online (13 October 2020): DOI: 10.1007/s00038-020-01497-x.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00038-020-01497-x
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Crime; Geocoded Data; Health Factors; Health, Chronic Conditions; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: To estimate the associations between US state-level corruption and risk factors for cardiovascular disease, one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the nation.

Methods: We used a US nationally-representative sample of middle-aged adults from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youths 1979 and data from the Corruption in America Survey to estimate the associations between state-level illegal (private gains) corruption and legal (political gains) corruption in 2013 and individual-level risks of incident diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and depression between 2014 and 2016.

Results: Medium and higher levels of illegal corruption were associated with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.75 (95% CI 1.06-2.88) for incident diabetes and 1.70 (95% CI 1.15-2.51) for incident hypertension, respectively. Furthermore, a higher level of legal corruption was associated with ORs of 1.84 (95% CI 1.08-3.13) for diabetes and 1.58 (95% CI 1.05-2.38) for hypertension. No consistent associations were observed for obesity or depression.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that higher levels of corruption contribute to increased risks of developing diabetes and hypertension. Investing resources into fighting corruption may be means to reduce the national burden of cardiovascular disease.

Bibliography Citation
Gero, Krisztina and Daniel Kim. "Prospective Associations between US State-level Corruption and Individual-level Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Middle-aged Americans: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youths 1979." International Journal of Public Health published online (13 October 2020): DOI: 10.1007/s00038-020-01497-x.
3. Kim, Daniel
Does Paid Vacation Leave Predict Depression in Working Americans?: A National Longitudinal Analysis
European Journal of Public Health 27, suppl_3 (November 2017): DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckx187.453.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/eurpub/article/27/suppl_3/ckx187.453/4556419
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Health, Mental; Leisure; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Methods: Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a longitudinal study of 12,686 men and women aged 14–21 years when first surveyed in 1979, and aged 45-52 years in 2010. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the impact of the number of annual paid vacation leave days measured at age 40 on depression measured using the validated 7-item CES-D scale at age 50, for 3,380 individuals working 30-90 hours/week and reporting no unemployment over the past 2 years. Models were adjusted for demographic and socioeconomic factors, physical health, and weekly hours, and controlled for individual fixed effects to reduce bias.

Results: Each 10 additional days of paid vacation leave predicted a 29% lower odds of depression in women (OR = 0.71; p = 0.01), while there was no association in men (OR = 1.07; p = 0.58; p for interaction = 0.02). A weaker association in Black vs. non-Hispanic White women was observed (p for interaction = 0.04). These findings were robust in sensitivity analyses that included extending the sample to those unemployed for up to 10 weeks over the previous 2 years.

Bibliography Citation
Kim, Daniel. "Does Paid Vacation Leave Predict Depression in Working Americans?: A National Longitudinal Analysis." European Journal of Public Health 27, suppl_3 (November 2017): DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckx187.453.
4. Kim, Daniel
Does Paid Vacation Leave Protect Against Depression among Working Americans? A National Longitudinal Fixed Effects Analysis
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health 45,1 (2019): 22-32.
Also: http://www.sjweh.fi/show_abstract.php?abstract_id=3751
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Nordic Association of Occupational Safety and Health (NOROSH)
Keyword(s): Benefits; Depression (see also CESD); Modeling, Fixed Effects

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The United States is the only advanced economy globally that does not guarantee its workers paid vacation leave. Although empirical studies have linked paid vacation leave to happiness and stress, no study has investigated the association between paid vacation leave and depression. Using a nationally-representative longitudinal sample of 3380 working men and women aged 45-52 years from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this study explored whether paid vacation leave may protect against depression.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Daniel. "Does Paid Vacation Leave Protect Against Depression among Working Americans? A National Longitudinal Fixed Effects Analysis." Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health 45,1 (2019): 22-32.
5. Rodgers, Justin
Briesacher, Becky A.
Wallace, Robert B.
Kawachi, Ichiro
Baum, Christopher F.
Kim, Daniel
County-level Housing Affordability in Relation to Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease among Middle-aged Adults: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youths 1979
Health and Place 59 (September 2019): DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2019.102194.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1353829218311791
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Geocoded Data; Health, Chronic Conditions; Household Income; Housing/Housing Characteristics/Types; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Obesity

Using a nationally-representative sample of middle-aged adults from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youths 1979 (NLSY79) and exploiting quasi-experimental variation before and after the Great Recession, we estimated the associations between the change in median county-level percentage of household income spent on housing (rent/mortgage) between 2000 and 2008 and individual-level risks of incident hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and depression from 2008 to 2014. We employed conditional fixed effects logistic regression models to reduce bias due to time-invariant confounding.
Bibliography Citation
Rodgers, Justin, Becky A. Briesacher, Robert B. Wallace, Ichiro Kawachi, Christopher F. Baum and Daniel Kim. "County-level Housing Affordability in Relation to Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease among Middle-aged Adults: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youths 1979." Health and Place 59 (September 2019): DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2019.102194.