Search Results

Source: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Covington, Reginald
Monson, William
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Price, Joseph P.
Sabia, Joseph J.
The Consequences of Teen Fatherhood: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97
Presented: Bethesda MD, National Center for Family and Marriage Research's Fathers and Fathering in Contemporary Contexts Research Conference, May 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Civic Engagement; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; Parenthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research Questions:

What are the consequences of having a teen birth on a variety of educational and economic outcomes and on civic engagement?
What are the differences in effects for teen mothers compared to teen fathers?
How have the consequences of teen parenthood changed across cohorts?
How stable are the results across different methods used to account for selection into teen parenthood

Conclusions:

Having a teen birth has negative consequences for a variety of outcomes
Some Consequences are similar for man and Women: Education; Civic engagement measures (except charitable giving)
Other consequences affect women primarily: Charitable giving; Poverty; Food stamp receipt
Many results are robust across multiple methods to account for selection: Education; Charitable giving (for women)
Other results become insignificant when using methods that account for unobservables: Civic engagement measures (except charitable giving); Food stamp receipt; Poverty

Bibliography Citation
Covington, Reginald, William Monson, H. Elizabeth Peters, Joseph P. Price and Joseph J. Sabia. "The Consequences of Teen Fatherhood: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97." Presented: Bethesda MD, National Center for Family and Marriage Research's Fathers and Fathering in Contemporary Contexts Research Conference, May 2012.
2. Dorius, Cassandra J.
Guzzo, Karen Benjamin
The Long Arm of Maternal Multipartnered Fertility and Adolescent Well-being
NCFMR Working Paper Series WP-13-04, National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, August 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Cohabitation; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Family Size; Family Structure; Fertility, Multiple Partners; Household Composition; Marital History/Transitions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Over the past decade, there has been an emerging body of research focusing on multipartnered fertility, where a parent has children by more than one partner. However, it is not clear if concern over multipartnered fertility, in and of itself, is warranted. We draw on 24 waves (1979-2010) of nationally representative data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth main youth interviews to create detailed relationship histories of mothers and then link these data to self-reported assessments of adolescent well-being found in 9 waves (1994-2010) of the young adult (NLSY79-YA) supplement. Results suggest that maternal multipartnered fertility has a significant direct and moderated effect on adolescent drug use and sexual debut net of cumulative family instability and exposure to particular family forms like marriage, cohabitation, and divorce. Moreover, maternal multipartnered fertility remained a significant predictor of both drug use and the timing of first sex even after accounting for selection into this family form and controlling for the adolescent’s experience of poverty, unemployment, and educational disadvantage at the time of birth and throughout childhood.
Bibliography Citation
Dorius, Cassandra J. and Karen Benjamin Guzzo. "The Long Arm of Maternal Multipartnered Fertility and Adolescent Well-being." NCFMR Working Paper Series WP-13-04, National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, August 2013.
3. Fomby, Paula
Sennott, Christie A.
Changes in Family Structure: Consequences for Adolescents' Behavior
Research Brief RB-09-03, National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, November 2009
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Structure; Household Composition; Marital Status; Mobility; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; School Progress; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Adolescents who experience repeated change in family structure as parents begin and end romantic unions are more likely than adolescents in stable family structures to engage in aggressive, antisocial, or delinquent behavior. This paper examines whether the link between family structure instability and behavior in adolescence may be explained, in part, by the residential and school mobility that are often associated with family structure change. Nationally-representative data from a two-generation study are used to assess the relative effects of instability and mobility on the mother-reported externalizing behavior and self-reported delinquent behavior of adolescents who were 12 to 17 years old in 2006. Results reveal residential and school mobility explain the association of family structure instability with each outcome, and these factors, in turn, are explained by children's exposure to poor peer networks.
Bibliography Citation
Fomby, Paula and Christie A. Sennott. "Changes in Family Structure: Consequences for Adolescents' Behavior." Research Brief RB-09-03, National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, November 2009.
4. Fomby, Paula
Sennott, Christie A.
Family Structure Instability and Residential and School Mobility: The Consequences for Adolescents' Behavior
Working Paper Series WP-09-08, Bowling Green State University, National Center for Family and Marriage Research, July 2009
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Structure; Household Composition; Mobility; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; School Progress; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Adolescents who experience repeated change in family structure as parents begin and end romantic unions are more likely than adolescents in stable family structures to engage in aggressive, antisocial, or delinquent behavior. We ask whether the link between family structure instability and behavior in adolescence may be explained in part by the residential and school mobility that are often associated with family structure change. Our analysis uses nationally-representative data from a two-generation study to assess the relative effects of instability and mobility on the mother-reported externalizing behavior and self-reported delinquent behavior of adolescents who were 12 to 17 years old in 2006. We find that residential and school mobility explain the association of family structure instability with each outcome, and these factors in turn are explained by children's exposure to poor peer networks.
Bibliography Citation
Fomby, Paula and Christie A. Sennott. "Family Structure Instability and Residential and School Mobility: The Consequences for Adolescents' Behavior." Working Paper Series WP-09-08, Bowling Green State University, National Center for Family and Marriage Research, July 2009.
5. Hemez, Paul
Young Adulthood: Cohabitation, Birth, and Marriage Experiences
NCFMR Family Profiles Report FP-18-22: National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, 2018.
Also: https://www.bgsu.edu/ncfmr/resources/data/family-profiles/hemez-young-adults-cohab-birth-mar-fp-18-22.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Age at First Marriage; Childbearing; Cohabitation; Marriage; Parenthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using rounds 1-17 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this Family Profile examines the share of young adults who had a child, got married, and/or cohabited before their 30th birthday for the cohort of men and women who were born between 1980 and 1984.
Bibliography Citation
Hemez, Paul. "Young Adulthood: Cohabitation, Birth, and Marriage Experiences." NCFMR Family Profiles Report FP-18-22: National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, 2018.
6. Payne, Krista K.
On the Road to Adulthood: Sequencing of Family Experiences
Family Profile Brief FP-11-11, National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, 2011.
Also: http://ncfmr.bgsu.edu/pdf/family_profiles/file102409.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Age at First Marriage; Cohabitation; Family Formation; Marriage; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

For many, an important marker of adulthood is forming a family—whether having a child, getting married, or cohabiting with a romantic partner. The past twenty years have seen increasing delays in the age at first birth among men and women (FP-11-04) and age at first marriage (FP-09-03) as well as increases in the proportion of young adults who have ever cohabited or are currently cohabiting (FP-10-07). Young adults can have vastly different experiences within this short period in the life course, with variation in the prevalence, timing, and sequencing of family formation experiences. This profile presents analyses of longitudinal data from the National Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) revealing the various family formation sequences of having a child, cohabitation, and marriage experienced among young adults by age 25.
Bibliography Citation
Payne, Krista K. "On the Road to Adulthood: Sequencing of Family Experiences." Family Profile Brief FP-11-11, National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, 2011.