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Source: Journal of Aging and Health
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Frech, Adrianne
Damaske, Sarah
Ohler, Adrienne
The Life Course of Unemployment and Midlife Health
Journal of Aging and Health published online (6 May 2022): DOI: 10.1177/08982643221091775
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: We estimate associations between unemployment trajectories from ages 27-49 and physical and mental health at age 50.

Methods: Data are from the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 (N=6434). Group-based trajectory models are used to identify unemployment trajectories. Generalized linear models with a modified Bolck, Croon, and Hagenaars (BCH) correction are used to regress health on unemployment trajectory groups.

Results: We identified "Consistently Low (70%)," "Decreasing Mid-Career (18%)," and "Persistently High (12%)" unemployment trajectories. Experiencing Decreasing Mid-Career or Persistently High trajectories was associated with worse physical and mental health at age 50 than Consistently Low trajectories. Experiencing a Persistently High trajectory was associated with worse physical and mental health than a Decreasing Mid-Career trajectory.

Bibliography Citation
Frech, Adrianne, Sarah Damaske and Adrienne Ohler. "The Life Course of Unemployment and Midlife Health." Journal of Aging and Health published online (6 May 2022): DOI: 10.1177/08982643221091775.
2. Long, J. Scott
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Life Course of Activity Limitations: Exploring Indicators of Functional Limitations over Time
Journal of Aging and Health 16,4 (August 2004): 490-517.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=13866432&db=aph
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Leisure; Scale Construction; Social Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: To strengthen the foundations for the use of survey-based measures of functional limitations and to explore associations between limitations in a variety of activities across the adult life course. Method: Five panels of data from the young and mature women's cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys are used to (a) examine patterns of limitations in activities as women age, (b) compare how limitations develop over the life course, (c) explore how limitations in one activity are associated with limitations in others, and (d) investigate whether limitations develop incrementally or occur in clusters. Results: We find that scales of functional limitations are not dependent on the age of the respondent, activity limitations emerge in clusters, and relationships between items do not consistently fall into upper and lower body groups. Discussion: Scales of functional limitations are equally applicable to younger and older women, but further research is needed to compare substantive results using different methods of scale construction. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Long, J. Scott and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Life Course of Activity Limitations: Exploring Indicators of Functional Limitations over Time." Journal of Aging and Health 16,4 (August 2004): 490-517.
3. Shippee, Tetyana P.
Rinaldo, Lindsay
Ferraro, Kenneth
Mortality Risk Among Black and White Working Women: The Role of Perceived Work Trajectories
Journal of Aging and Health 24,1 (February 2012): 141-167.
Also: http://jah.sagepub.com/content/24/1/141.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Mortality; Racial Differences; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, the authors examine the relationship between perceived work trajectories and mortality risk among Black and White women over 36 years.

Method: Panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (1967-2003) are used to evaluate how objective and subjective elements of work shape mortality risk for Black and White women born between 1923 and 1937.

Results: Estimates from Cox proportional hazards models reveal that Black working women manifest higher mortality risk than White working women even after accounting for occupation, personal income, and household wealth. Perceived work trajectories were also associated with mortality risk for Black women but not for White women.

Discussion: The findings reveal the imprint of women’s work life on mortality, especially for Black women, and illustrate the importance of considering personal meanings associated with objective work characteristics.

Bibliography Citation
Shippee, Tetyana P., Lindsay Rinaldo and Kenneth Ferraro. "Mortality Risk Among Black and White Working Women: The Role of Perceived Work Trajectories." Journal of Aging and Health 24,1 (February 2012): 141-167.
4. Thomeer, Mieke Beth
Reczek, Rin
Ross, Clifford
Childbearing Biographies and Midlife Women's Health
Journal of Aging and Health published online (3 February 2022): DOI: 10.1177/08982643211070136.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/08982643211070136
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Births, Repeat / Spacing; Childbearing; Family Size; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Modeling, Latent Class Analysis/Latent Transition Analysis; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: We introduce a "childbearing biography" approach to show how multiple childbearing characteristics cluster in ways significant for midlife health.

Methods: We analyze the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79; N = 3992) using mixed-mode Latent Class Analysis with eight childbearing variables (e.g., age at first birth, parity, birth spacing, and mistimed births) to identify how childbearing biographies are associated with midlife health, adjusting for key covariates--including socioeconomic status (SES) and relationship history.

Results: We identify six childbearing biographies: (1) early compressed, (2) staggered, (3) extended high parity, (4) later, (5) married planned, and (6) childfree. Childbearing biographies are strongly associated with physical health but not mental health, with differences primarily explained by SES.

Bibliography Citation
Thomeer, Mieke Beth, Rin Reczek and Clifford Ross. "Childbearing Biographies and Midlife Women's Health." Journal of Aging and Health published online (3 February 2022): DOI: 10.1177/08982643211070136.
5. Wight, Richard G.
Aneshensel, Carol S.
Seeman, Teresa E.
Educational Attainment, Continued Learning Experience, and Cognitive Function among Older Men
Journal of Aging and Health 14,2 (May 2002): 211-236
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Cognitive Ability; Continuing Education; Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Life Course; Occupational Status; Training, Occupational

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: This report assesses the effects of educational attainment, post-educational training experience, and occupational status on cognitive function among older men, controlling for demographic and health factors. Conditional relationships between educational attainment and factors that importantly influence cognitive function are also investigated. Methods: Data from a nationally representative sample of 1,839 older men are used to explore life-course effects of occupational and training experiences during the 1960's, 1970's, and 1980's. Results: A positive relationship is found between formal educational attainment and cognitive function, but this association is conditional on subsequent training experience, ethnicity, and symptoms of depression. Training experiences are also positively associated with cognitive function. Discussion: Continued pursuit of education and training may offer opportunities to promote cognitive function throughout the life course, especially among those with low educational attainment early in life.
Bibliography Citation
Wight, Richard G., Carol S. Aneshensel and Teresa E. Seeman. "Educational Attainment, Continued Learning Experience, and Cognitive Function among Older Men." Journal of Aging and Health 14,2 (May 2002): 211-236.