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Author: Thomas, Patricia A.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Upenieks, Laura
Thomas, Patricia A.
Gaining Faith, Losing Faith: How Education Shapes the Relationship between Religious Transitions and Later Depression
Journal of Health and Social Behavior published online (19 October 2021): DOI: 10.1177/00221465211046356.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/00221465211046356
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; Health, Mental; Religion

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using the life course perspective, we assess the "resources" and "risks" to mental health associated with transitions in religious attendance between early life and midlife and how this process may be influenced by education. Drawing on over 35 years of prospective panel data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, baseline models suggest that stable, frequent attendance accumulated between adolescence to midlife and increases to frequent attendance by adulthood are associated with the lowest depression relative to consistent nonattenders. Individuals who declined in their religious participation report higher depression. Education conditioned this association, whereby declines in religious participation negatively impacted the health of those without a college degree more strongly and increases benefitted the well-educated to a greater extent. We combine insights from the life course perspective and work on social stratification and religiosity to interpret our results and offer directives for future research.
Bibliography Citation
Upenieks, Laura and Patricia A. Thomas. "Gaining Faith, Losing Faith: How Education Shapes the Relationship between Religious Transitions and Later Depression." Journal of Health and Social Behavior published online (19 October 2021): DOI: 10.1177/00221465211046356.
2. Upenieks, Laura
Thomas, Patricia A.
Matters of the Heart: Childhood Maltreatment, Religious Transitions, and Cardiovascular-Related Problems over the Life Course
Journal of Aging and Health published online (2 November 2022): DOI: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/08982643221135689
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Religious Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: Childhood maltreatment is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular-related problems, the leading cause of death in the United States. Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, this study considers whether transitions in religious attendance moderate the deleterious impact of childhood maltreatment on long-term cardiovascular risk.

Methods: We utilize over 35 years of prospective panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth from the United States (1979–2015).

Results: Our findings suggest that decreases in religious attendance between adolescence and adulthood (from high to low, and high to moderate attendance) were associated with elevated cardiovascular-related risk for those abused as children. Neither stable high attendance nor increases in attendance buffered against the impact of childhood abuse on cardiovascular-related problems.

Bibliography Citation
Upenieks, Laura and Patricia A. Thomas. "Matters of the Heart: Childhood Maltreatment, Religious Transitions, and Cardiovascular-Related Problems over the Life Course." Journal of Aging and Health published online (2 November 2022): DOI: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/08982643221135689.