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Author: Ferraro, Kenneth
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Shippee, Tetyana P.
Rinaldo, Lindsay
Ferraro, Kenneth
Mortality Risk Among Black and White Working Women: The Role of Perceived Work Trajectories
Journal of Aging and Health 24,1 (February 2012): 141-167.
Also: http://jah.sagepub.com/content/24/1/141.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Mortality; Racial Differences; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, the authors examine the relationship between perceived work trajectories and mortality risk among Black and White women over 36 years.

Method: Panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (1967-2003) are used to evaluate how objective and subjective elements of work shape mortality risk for Black and White women born between 1923 and 1937.

Results: Estimates from Cox proportional hazards models reveal that Black working women manifest higher mortality risk than White working women even after accounting for occupation, personal income, and household wealth. Perceived work trajectories were also associated with mortality risk for Black women but not for White women.

Discussion: The findings reveal the imprint of women’s work life on mortality, especially for Black women, and illustrate the importance of considering personal meanings associated with objective work characteristics.

Bibliography Citation
Shippee, Tetyana P., Lindsay Rinaldo and Kenneth Ferraro. "Mortality Risk Among Black and White Working Women: The Role of Perceived Work Trajectories." Journal of Aging and Health 24,1 (February 2012): 141-167.
2. Wilkinson, Lindsay R.
Ferraro, Kenneth
Mustillo, Sarah
Wealth in Middle and Later Life: Examining the Life Course Timing of Women's Health Limitations
The Gerontologist published online (04 June 2018): DOI: 10.1093/geront/gny048.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/gerontologist/advance-article/doi/10.1093/geront/gny048/5032612
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Disability; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Wealth

Research Design and Methods: Using 36 years of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, piecewise growth curve and linear regression models were used to estimate the effects of life course timing and duration of health limitations on household wealth.

Results: The findings reveal that women who experienced health limitations accumulated substantially less wealth over time, especially if the health limitations were manifest during childhood or early adulthood.

Bibliography Citation
Wilkinson, Lindsay R., Kenneth Ferraro and Sarah Mustillo. "Wealth in Middle and Later Life: Examining the Life Course Timing of Women's Health Limitations." The Gerontologist published online (04 June 2018): DOI: 10.1093/geront/gny048.
3. Wilkinson, Lindsay R.
Shippee, Tetyana P.
Ferraro, Kenneth
Does Occupational Mobility Influence Health among Working Women? Comparing Objective and Subjective Measures of Work Trajectories
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 53,4 (December 2012): 432-447.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/53/4/432.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Duncan Index; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mobility, Occupational; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Occupational mobility is highly valued in American society, but is it consequential to women’s health? Previous studies have yielded inconsistent results, but most measured occupational mobility by identifying transitions across occupational categories. Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, this study (1) compares objective and subjective measures of work trajectories and (2) examines the contributions of each to self-rated health. With 36 years of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (1967-2003), growth curve models are used to estimate the effects of middle-aged work trajectories on health among 2,503 U.S. women. Work trajectories as measured by the Duncan Socioeconomic Index predict health, but not after adjustment for perceived work trajectories and status characteristics. The findings reveal that subjective measures of occupational mobility provide important information for assessing health consequences of work transitions and that downward occupational mobility in middle age is deleterious to women’s health in later life.
Bibliography Citation
Wilkinson, Lindsay R., Tetyana P. Shippee and Kenneth Ferraro. "Does Occupational Mobility Influence Health among Working Women? Comparing Objective and Subjective Measures of Work Trajectories." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 53,4 (December 2012): 432-447.