Search Results

Author: Damaske, Sarah
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Damaske, Sarah
Frech, Adrianne
Women's Work Pathways Across the Life Course
Demography 53,2 (April 2016): 365-391.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13524-016-0464-z
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Employment; Family Constraints; Labor Force Participation; Life Course; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite numerous changes in women's employment in the latter half of the twentieth century, women's employment continues to be uneven and stalled. Drawing from data on women's weekly work hours in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), we identify significant inequality in women's labor force experiences across adulthood. We find two pathways of stable full-time work for women, three pathways of part-time employment, and a pathway of unpaid labor. A majority of women follow one of the two full-time work pathways, while fewer than 10 % follow a pathway of unpaid labor. Our findings provide evidence of the lasting influence of work–family conflict and early socioeconomic advantages and disadvantages on women’s work pathways. Indeed, race, poverty, educational attainment, and early family characteristics significantly shaped women’s work careers. Work–family opportunities and constraints also were related to women's work hours, as were a woman’s gendered beliefs and expectations. We conclude that women's employment pathways are a product of both their resources and changing social environment as well as individual agency. Significantly, we point to social stratification, gender ideologies, and work–family constraints, all working in concert, as key explanations for how women are "tracked" onto work pathways from an early age.
Bibliography Citation
Damaske, Sarah and Adrianne Frech. "Women's Work Pathways Across the Life Course." Demography 53,2 (April 2016): 365-391.
2. Frech, Adrianne
Damaske, Sarah
Men's Income Trajectories and Physical and Mental Health at Midlife
American Journal of Sociology 124,5 (March 2019): 1372-1412.
Also: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.1086/702775
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Income; Mobility, Economic

Using time-varying, prospectively measured income in a nationally representative sample of baby-boomer men (the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979), the authors identify eight group-based trajectories of income between ages 25 and 49 and use multinomial treatment models to describe the associations between group-based income trajectories and mental and physical health at midlife. The authors find remarkable rigidity in income trajectories: less than 25% of the sample experiences significant upward or downward mobility between ages 25 and 49, and most who move remain or move into poverty. Men's physical and mental health at age 50 is strongly associated with their income trajectories, and some upwardly mobile men achieve the same physical and mental health as the highest earning men after adjusting for selection. The worse physical and mental health of men on other income trajectories is largely attributable to their early life disadvantages, health behaviors, and cumulative work experiences.
Bibliography Citation
Frech, Adrianne and Sarah Damaske. "Men's Income Trajectories and Physical and Mental Health at Midlife." American Journal of Sociology 124,5 (March 2019): 1372-1412.
3. Frech, Adrianne
Damaske, Sarah
Men's Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health at Midlife
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Life Course; Part-Time Work; Work Hours; Work, Atypical

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this paper makes two significant contributions to the study of the relationship between men's work and their health at middle age. First, this paper provides the first, to our knowledge, examination of men's longitudinal work pathways using national data and prospective work histories and demonstrates substantial variation in men's work patterns across the life course. We find that the majority of men (just under 80%) work at least 40 hours a week steadily over their twenties, thirties, and early forties. Notably, 20% of men do not follow this standard pattern, suggesting that men's longitudinal workforce participation is much more diverse than is often acknowledged. Second, we find that men's longitudinal work pathways are related to their health at middle age with men who following declining part-time and declining full-time positions experiencing poorer physical and mental health at middle age, although selection into work pathways and characteristics at age 40 account for some of these differences. Our findings suggests that the achievement of steady full-time work may provide long-term health benefits and that access to such stable employment is heavily stratified.
Bibliography Citation
Frech, Adrianne and Sarah Damaske. "Men's Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health at Midlife." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
4. Frech, Adrianne
Damaske, Sarah
The Relationships between Mothers’ Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health
Presented: Denver CO, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): First Birth; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Life Course; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use the NLSY79 to investigate the relationships between mothers’ longitudinal work pathways and health during middle age and find that full-time, continuous employment following a first birth is associated with significantly better health at age forty than part-time work, paid work interrupted by at least three bouts of unemployment, and unpaid work in the home. Part-time workers with little unemployment report significantly better mental and physical health at age forty than mothers experiencing persistent unemployment. These relationships remain after accounting for the unequal selection of more advantaged mothers into fulltime, continuous employment, and are in part attributable to pre-work pathway characteristics such as cognitive ability, single parenthood, and age at first birth. Findings support our hypotheses that full-time, continuous work is associated with better physical and mental health net of the characteristics that select mothers into work, and for some, net of the socioeconomic resources that continuous work provides.
Bibliography Citation
Frech, Adrianne and Sarah Damaske. "The Relationships between Mothers’ Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health." Presented: Denver CO, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2012.
5. Frech, Adrianne
Damaske, Sarah
The Relationships between Mothers’ Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 53,4 (December 2012): 396-412.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/53/4/396.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): First Birth; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Life Course; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We contribute to research on the relationships between gender, work, and health by using longitudinal, theoretically driven models of mothers’ diverse work pathways and adjusting for unequal selection into these pathways. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Youth-1979 (N = 2,540), we find full-time, continuous employment following a first birth is associated with significantly better health at age 40 than part-time work, paid work interrupted by unemployment, and unpaid work in the home. Part-time workers with little unemployment report significantly better health at age 40 than mothers experiencing persistent unemployment. These relationships remain after accounting for the unequal selection of more advantaged mothers into full-time, continuous employment, suggesting full-time workers benefit from cumulating advantages across the life course and reiterating the need to disentangle health benefits associated with work from those associated with pre-pregnancy characteristics.
Bibliography Citation
Frech, Adrianne and Sarah Damaske. "The Relationships between Mothers’ Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 53,4 (December 2012): 396-412.
6. Pessin, Lee
Damaske, Sarah
Frech, Adrianne
How Race and Class Shape Women's Work and Family Lives From Early Adulthood to Midlife
Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Family Influences; Family Size; Labor Force Participation; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Cumulative individual patterns of employment and family transitions have long lasting consequences for women's later-life financial security and health. Yet, despite an established consensus that race and class predict different patterns of either work or family, little is known about how these predictors jointly intersect in influencing women's work-family trajectories. In this article, we study how race and class shape the interrelationship between labor force attachment and family events -- number of children and partnership status -- during women's life courses, from early adulthood to midlife. We apply multichannel sequence analysis to data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) to examine longitudinal work-family trajectories for Black, Hispanic, and white women between the ages of 18 to 45. By revealing distinctive features of the work-family interplay, our analysis highlights the joint roles of race and class in shaping women's work and family decisions.
Bibliography Citation
Pessin, Lee, Sarah Damaske and Adrianne Frech. "How Race and Class Shape Women's Work and Family Lives From Early Adulthood to Midlife." Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018.