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Author: Cesur, Resul
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Cesur, Resul
Kelly, Inas Rashad
From Cradle to Classroom: High Birth Weight and Cognitive Outcomes
Forum for Health Economics and Policy 13,2 (2010): Article 2 .
Also: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/fhep.2010.13.2/fhep.2010.13.2.1189/fhep.2010.13.2.1189.xml?format=INT
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Body Mass Index (BMI); Breastfeeding; Cognitive Development; Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B, ECLS-K); Obesity; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While the effects of low birth weight have long been explored, the literature on the effects of high birth weight is sparse. However, with increasing obesity rates in the United States, high birth weight has become a potential concern, and has been associated in the medical literature with an increased likelihood of becoming an overweight child, adolescent, and subsequently an obese adult. Overweight and obesity, in turn, are associated with a host of negative effects, including lower test scores in school and lower labor market prospects when adults. If studies only focus on low birth weight, they may underestimate the effects of ensuring that mothers receive adequate support during pregnancy. This study finds that cognitive outcomes are adversely affected not only by low birth weight (<2500 grams) but also by high birth weight (>4500 grams). Our results have policy implications in terms of provision of support for pregnant women.
Bibliography Citation
Cesur, Resul and Inas Rashad Kelly. "From Cradle to Classroom: High Birth Weight and Cognitive Outcomes." Forum for Health Economics and Policy 13,2 (2010): Article 2 .
2. Cesur, Resul
Rashad, Inas
High Birth Weight and Cognitive Outcomes
NBER Working Paper 14524, National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2008.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w14524
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Body Mass Index (BMI); Breastfeeding; Cognitive Development; Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B, ECLS-K); Obesity; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

While the effects of low birth weight have long been explored, those of high birth weight have been essentially ignored. Economists have analyzed the negative effects that low birth weight might have on subsequent school outcomes, while taking into account unobserved characteristics that may be common to families with low birth weight babies and negative outcomes in terms of school test scores when children, in addition to labor market income when adults. Today, however, with increasing obesity rates in the United States, high birth weight has become a potential concern, and has been associated in the medical literature with an increased likelihood of becoming an overweight child, adolescent, and subsequently an obese adult. Overweight and obesity, in turn, are associated with a host of negative effects, including lower test scores in school and lower labor market prospects when adults. If studies only focus on low birth weight, they may underestimate the effects of ensuring that mothers receive adequate support during pregnancy. In this study we find that cognitive outcomes are adversely affected not only by low birth weight (<2500 grams) but also by high birth weight (>4500 grams). Our results have policy implications in terms of provision of support for pregnant women.
Bibliography Citation
Cesur, Resul and Inas Rashad. "High Birth Weight and Cognitive Outcomes." NBER Working Paper 14524, National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2008.
3. Fone, Zachary S.
Sabia, Joseph J.
Cesur, Resul
Do Minimum Wage Increases Reduce Crime?
NBER Working Paper No. 25647, National Bureau of Economic Research, March 2019.
Also: https://www.nber.org/papers/w25647
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Minimum Wage

An April 2016 Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) report advocated raising the minimum wage to deter crime. This recommendation rests on the assumption that minimum wage hikes increase the returns to legitimate labor market work while generating minimal adverse employment effects. This study comprehensively assesses the impact of minimum wages on crime using data from the 1998-2016 Uniform Crime Reports (UCR), National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS), and National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY). Our results provide no evidence that minimum wage increases reduce crime. Instead, we find that raising the minimum wage increases property crime arrests among those ages 16-to-24, with an estimated elasticity of 0.2. This result is strongest in counties with over 100,000 residents and persists when we use longitudinal data to isolate workers for whom minimum wages bind. Our estimates suggest that a $15 Federal minimum wage could generate criminal externality costs of nearly $2.4 billion.
Bibliography Citation
Fone, Zachary S., Joseph J. Sabia and Resul Cesur. "Do Minimum Wage Increases Reduce Crime?" NBER Working Paper No. 25647, National Bureau of Economic Research, March 2019.