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Author: Miljus, Robert C.
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Andrisani, Paul J.
Appelbaum, Eileen
Koppel, Ross
Miljus, Robert C.
Work Attitudes and Labor Market Experience: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Surveys
New York, NY: Praeger Publishers, Inc, 1978
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Praeger Publishers
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Discrimination, Sex; Job Satisfaction; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Occupational Attainment; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Work Attitudes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Numerous forces shape the development of attitudes toward work. Job dissatisfaction does not arise exclusively among those whose unique labor market problems have already been singled out by policy makers for special attention. Job dissatisfaction has not been entirely at the lower end of the occupational, industrial, and income structures, or only within certain age-sex-race groups. Age-sex-race differences in the perceived payoffs to initiative are virtually nonexistent, despite the vast differences in work experience that exist on the basis of age, sex, and race. Our attempts to assess the extent to which labor market forces impact upon attitudinal change have met with only modest success.
Bibliography Citation
Andrisani, Paul J., Eileen Appelbaum, Ross Koppel and Robert C. Miljus. Work Attitudes and Labor Market Experience: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Surveys. New York, NY: Praeger Publishers, Inc, 1978.
2. Andrisani, Paul J.
Appelbaum, Eileen
Koppel, Ross
Miljus, Robert C.
Work Attitudes and Work Experience: The Impact of Attitudes on Behavior
R and D Monograph 60. Washington, DC: US Department of Labor, 1979
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Behavior; Career Patterns; Discrimination, Sex; Job Satisfaction; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Occupational Attainment; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Training, Occupational; Work Attitudes

This monograph is a summary (prepared by Dr. Florence M. Casey, Office of Research and Development, Employment and Training Administration, USDOL) of the authors' book Work Attitudes and Labor Market Experience: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Surveys (Praeger, 1978). Job satisfaction was found to decline somewhat between 1966 and 1972 and the decline was most pronounced among white collar workers, service workers, farmers, and craft workers. Fewer than 15 percent of workers reported disliking their jobs, however. Inequities in distribution of rewards among comparable workers were most strongly linked to dissatisfaction. Workers with stronger internality enjoyed greater success than others. Dissatisfaction is linked to higher turnover and unemployment and decreased wages, except blacks, who improved their wages by changing employers. Purely economic rewards were not so important to satisfied workers as job content, but they were major causes of dissatisfaction among those who were less than highly satisfied. Motivation and high occupational goals were important for younger workers. Strong commitment to work resulted in less time out of the labor force, greater investment in training (among younger women and older men) and greater labor market advancement (among younger and older women). White working women who perceived their husbands as disapproving of their working outside the home advanced less in occupational status, had more unemployment and weeks out of the labor force, and had less likelihood of getting formal occupational training than women whose husbands did not object to their working.
Bibliography Citation
Andrisani, Paul J., Eileen Appelbaum, Ross Koppel and Robert C. Miljus. Work Attitudes and Work Experience: The Impact of Attitudes on Behavior. R and D Monograph 60. Washington, DC: US Department of Labor, 1979.
3. Andrisani, Paul J.
Miljus, Robert C.
Multivariate Analysis of Individual Differences in Preferences for Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Aspects of Work among National Samples of Young and Middle-Aged Women
Journal of Vocational Behavior 11,1 (August 1977): 14-30.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0001879177900148
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Intrinsic/Extrinsic Rewards; Job Rewards; Job Satisfaction; Rural/Urban Migration; White Collar Jobs

The authors examine, in a multivariate analysis, individual differences in preferences for intrinsic versus extrinsic aspects of work. Preferences are found to be significantly related to age, occupation, class of worker status, job satisfaction, educational attainment, and race. There was little evidence of preference difference between white-collar and blue- collar workers, between rural and urban workers, or among individuals with different levels of income.
Bibliography Citation
Andrisani, Paul J. and Robert C. Miljus. "Multivariate Analysis of Individual Differences in Preferences for Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Aspects of Work among National Samples of Young and Middle-Aged Women." Journal of Vocational Behavior 11,1 (August 1977): 14-30.
4. Miljus, Robert C.
Parnes, Herbert S.
Schmidt, Ronald M.
Spitz, Ruth S.
Some Correlates of the Labor Market Status of Male Youth
In: Transition from School to Work: A Report Based on the Princeton Manpower Symposium May 9-10, 1968: Research Report Series No: 111. Princeton, NJ: Industrial Relations Section, Princeton University, 1968.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED033204&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED033204
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Industrial Relations Section, Princeton University
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Transition, School to Work; Unemployment, Youth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Among the variables which have thus far been investigated in our research, enrollment status, high school curriculum and educational aspirations, age, marital status, health condition, and veteran status are systematically related to the labor force participation of young men. Of these, the most powerful explanatory variable, as would be expected, is whether the young man is enrolled in school. On the average, those who are not enrolled are almost twice as likely to be in the labor force as are those who are currently attending school.
Bibliography Citation
Miljus, Robert C., Herbert S. Parnes, Ronald M. Schmidt and Ruth S. Spitz. "Some Correlates of the Labor Market Status of Male Youth" In: Transition from School to Work: A Report Based on the Princeton Manpower Symposium May 9-10, 1968: Research Report Series No: 111. Princeton, NJ: Industrial Relations Section, Princeton University, 1968.
5. Parnes, Herbert S.
Fleisher, Belton M.
Miljus, Robert C.
Spitz, Ruth S.
Introduction
In: Years for Decision, Volume 1, Manpower Research Monograph 24. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1971
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Family Background and Culture; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Training; Mobility

The volume aims to explain the variation in school and labor market experiences and in the educational aspirations of young women. This introduction identifies these variables: unemployment, mobility, educational and occupational aspirations, labor force participation, formative influences, marital and familial characteristics, financial status, actual education and training, health and attitude, and explains how they were assessed by the study itself.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., Belton M. Fleisher, Robert C. Miljus and Ruth S. Spitz. "Introduction" In: Years for Decision, Volume 1, Manpower Research Monograph 24. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1971
6. Parnes, Herbert S.
Fleisher, Belton M.
Miljus, Robert C.
Spitz, Ruth S.
Pre-Retirement Years, Volume 1: A Longitudinal Study of the Labor Market Experience of the Cohort of Men 45-59 Years of Age
Manpower Research Monograph 15, Volume 1. Washington DC: US GPO, 1968
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Behavior; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Household Income; Job Satisfaction; Job Tenure; Mobility, Job; Pensions; Retirement; Unemployment; Work Attitudes

As the prologue to an intensive study of the labor market experience and behavior over a five-year period of males who were age 45-59 in mid l966, this study examines their status at the time of the initial interview in mid l966, and seeks explanations for variations in current status on the basis of a large number of economic, social, and psychological variables. Specific areas discussed include the extent of their current participation in the labor market, susceptibility to unemployment, distribution in the labor market, the duration of service in current jobs, and rates of pay. In addition to describing the pattern of occupational and geographic change during their working lives to date, their attitudes toward working in general and their jobs in particular, and their reactions to certain types of job changes, including complete withdrawal from the labor market are explored. Variations in all these aspects of behavior and attitudes have been sought in terms of a large number of demographic, economic, and attitudinal characteristics, and numerous relationships that have been uncovered appear to have explanatory and predictive value.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., Belton M. Fleisher, Robert C. Miljus and Ruth S. Spitz. Pre-Retirement Years, Volume 1: A Longitudinal Study of the Labor Market Experience of the Cohort of Men 45-59 Years of Age. Manpower Research Monograph 15, Volume 1. Washington DC: US GPO, 1968.
7. Parnes, Herbert S.
Miljus, Robert C.
Spitz, Ruth S.
Career Thresholds, Volume 1: A longitudinal Study of the Educational and Labor Market Experience of Male Youth 14-24 Years of Age
Manpower Research Monograph 16, Volume 1. Washington DC: US GPO, 1969
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Employment; High School; Job Search; Occupational Aspirations; Teenagers; Wages; Work Attitudes; Work Knowledge

Data drawn from interviews conducted during October-December 1966 with the NLS of Young Men ages 14 to 24 provides the basis for examining the relationships between selected demographic, attitudinal, and educational characteristics of male youth in the United States and their labor market experience and occupational aspirations. The cohort's labor force participation, unemployment experience, employment patterns, labor market knowledge, job attitudes, and educational and occupational aspirations as of the time of the initial survey in 1966 are analyzed and explanations for variations in these factors based on a large number of economic, social, and psychological variables are offered.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., Robert C. Miljus and Ruth S. Spitz. Career Thresholds, Volume 1: A longitudinal Study of the Educational and Labor Market Experience of Male Youth 14-24 Years of Age. Manpower Research Monograph 16, Volume 1. Washington DC: US GPO, 1969.