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Author: Jackson, Dylan B.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Connolly, Eric J.
Jackson, Dylan B.
Adolescent Gang Membership and Adverse Behavioral, Mental Health, and Physical Health Outcomes in Young Adulthood: A Within-Family Analysis
Criminal Justice and Behavior 46,11 (November 2019): 1566-1586.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0093854819871076
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Anxiety; Arrests; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Dropouts; Health, Mental; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research suggests that adolescent gang membership increases the likelihood of adverse behavioral and mental health outcomes during adolescence. Less research, however, has examined whether gang membership is associated with adverse outcomes in young adulthood, and whether these associations remain after controlling for genetic and shared environmental factors that cluster within families. Data from a sample of full sibling pairs from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 are analyzed to test these hypotheses. Multivariate logistic regression models show that gang membership is associated with higher odds of arrest, alcohol abuse, severe anxious and depressive symptomatology, high school drop-out status, poor general health, and not seeking medical attention when needed in young adulthood. After controlling for familial confounding, siblings with a history of adolescent gang membership are more likely to report an arrest, never graduating high school, and severe anxious and depressive symptomatology. Implications of these results for future research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Connolly, Eric J. and Dylan B. Jackson. "Adolescent Gang Membership and Adverse Behavioral, Mental Health, and Physical Health Outcomes in Young Adulthood: A Within-Family Analysis." Criminal Justice and Behavior 46,11 (November 2019): 1566-1586.
2. Connolly, Eric J.
Jackson, Dylan B.
Semenza, Daniel C.
Quality Over Quantity? Using Sibling Comparisons to Examine Relations between Sleep Quality, Sleep Duration, and Delinquency
Social Science and Medicine published online (21 May 2021): 114053.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953621003853
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Siblings; Sleep

Objective: The current study examines the relationship between self-reported restless sleep, sleep duration, and delinquency from ages 16-19 in a population-based sample of U.S. youth.

Methods: Data from full siblings from the Children and Young Adult sample of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (CNLSY) are analyzed. Negative binomial regression models and sibling comparisons are estimated to assess between- and within-family effects of sleep on delinquency during ages 16-17. Sibling comparison cross-lagged models are then fitted to the data to examine whether sibling differences in sleep are related to sibling differences in changes in delinquency from ages 16-19.

Results: Siblings with higher levels of self-reported restless sleep were more likely to report higher levels of delinquency at ages 16-17, net of observable covariates and unobservable familial confounders. Sibling differences in restless sleep at ages 16-17 were also associated with increases in delinquency at ages 18-19 after controlling for familial confounding and temporal stability in both sleep and delinquent behavior.

Bibliography Citation
Connolly, Eric J., Dylan B. Jackson and Daniel C. Semenza. "Quality Over Quantity? Using Sibling Comparisons to Examine Relations between Sleep Quality, Sleep Duration, and Delinquency." Social Science and Medicine published online (21 May 2021): 114053.
3. Connolly, Eric J.
Schwartz, Joseph A.
Jackson, Dylan B.
Beaver, Kevin M.
How Far Does the Apple Fall from the Tree? Maternal Delinquency and Sex-specific Patterns of Offspring Delinquent Behavior
Journal of Criminal Justice 54 (January-February 2018): 50-61.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047235217305159
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Parental Influences

Purpose: Examine whether parental offending is directly associated with male and female offspring patterns of delinquent behavior during adolescence and indirectly associated with risk for criminal conviction in young adulthood.

Methods: Latent growth curve models and growth mixture models are estimated using intergenerational data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine the effects of maternal offending on rates of growth and distinct trajectories of delinquent behavior in male and female children.

Results: The results revealed that maternal offending was associated with higher starting levels and slower rates of decline in delinquent behavior in male and female children. Growth mixture modeling, however, revealed that a four-class solution explained patterns of delinquency in male offspring, while a three-class solution explained patterns of delinquency in female offspring. Multivariate analyses indicated that maternal offending was more strongly associated with male offending classes than female offending classes, with males in the high and slowly declining class and moderate and increasing class demonstrating the highest risk for criminal conviction in young adulthood.

Conclusions: Maternal offending is more strongly associated with serious patterns of delinquent behavior and risk for future criminal conviction in male offspring than in female offspring.

Bibliography Citation
Connolly, Eric J., Joseph A. Schwartz, Dylan B. Jackson and Kevin M. Beaver. "How Far Does the Apple Fall from the Tree? Maternal Delinquency and Sex-specific Patterns of Offspring Delinquent Behavior." Journal of Criminal Justice 54 (January-February 2018): 50-61.