Search Results

Author: Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
A New Midlife Crisis?: An Examination of Parents Who Borrow to Pay for Their Children's College Education
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Children; College Cost; College Education; Debt/Borrowing; Parental Investments; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Discussions of educational debt often overlook the debts parents take on to pay for their children's education. We identify parental characteristics associated with child-related educational debt among the late baby boom cohort using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. We restrict our sample to parents who had at least one child ≥17 years old and answered questions on educational debt during mid-life (n=6,562). Craggit models estimated 1) having any child-related educational debt and 2) the amount of debt owed among debtors. Black parents and parents with more education, higher income, and higher networth were more likely to report child-related educational debt than White parents and parents with no degree, low-income, or negative networth. Among debtors, high-income parents had more debt than low-income parents. Our findings suggest the student debt crisis is a looming concern for mid-life adults and may have important implications for the aging population.
Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle and Jennifer A. Ailshire. "A New Midlife Crisis?: An Examination of Parents Who Borrow to Pay for Their Children's College Education." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
2. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Are Young Adults Losing Out on Sleep? Changes in Sleep Duration in a U.S. Population-based Study
Presented: Dublin, Ireland, Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies (SLLS) International Conference, October 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies
Keyword(s): Children; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; Household Composition; Labor Force Participation; Sleep; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Chronic sleep problems are widespread in the U.S. population, affect an estimated 50 to 70 million U.S. adults, and are associated with a number of adverse health outcomes. We know relatively little about how sleep duration changes over time, and specifically how sleep duration changes over the course of early adulthood, a period marked by substantial transitions into and out of education, employment, and family roles. We use prospective data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, a U.S. based representative sample of persons born between 1980 and 1984. Baseline interviews were conducted in 1997, with annual follow-ups through 2011. Sleep duration was assessed in 2002, 2007, 2009, 2010, and 2011. We estimated random-coefficient models to examine how sleep duration changes during early adulthood as a function of demographic characteristics, educational experiences, employment, and family roles. Results indicate that sleep duration declines from 18 to 30 years old, from approximately 7.25 hours to 6.6 hours on a typical weeknight. Men sleep an average of 1.25 hours longer than women at age 18, but this sleep advantage declines to 18 minutes by age 30. Young adults with less than a high school education sleep longer than those with more education with the exception of college-educated young adults, and this difference does not change over time. Part-time and full-time workers report shorter sleep than non-workers, but over time, this difference narrows slightly. Finally, young adults with children in the household sleep consistently less than young adults with no children in the household. Overall, U.S. young adults experience shorter sleep over the course of early adulthood, but changes in sleep duration vary widely by demographic factors, education, employment, and family roles. This study is the first to establish how sleep duration changes during this important life stage.
Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle and Jennifer A. Ailshire. "Are Young Adults Losing Out on Sleep? Changes in Sleep Duration in a U.S. Population-based Study." Presented: Dublin, Ireland, Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies (SLLS) International Conference, October 2015.
3. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Student Debt Spans Generations: Characteristics of Parents Who Borrow to Pay for Their Children's College Education
The Journals of Gerontology: Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 72,6 (October 2017): 1084-1089.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/psychsocgerontology/article/72/6/1084/2645641
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): College Cost; Debt/Borrowing; Parental Investments; Student Loans

Objectives: Discussions of student debt often overlook the debt parents take on to pay for their children's education. We identify characteristics of parents with child-related educational debt among the late baby boom cohort.

Method: Data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a nationally representative sample of individuals born between 1957 and 1964. We restrict our sample to parents who had any children aged ≥17 and answered questions on educational debt during midlife (n = 6,562). Craggit models estimated (a) having any child-related educational debt and (b) the amount of debt owed among debtors.

Results: Black parents and parents with more education, higher income, and higher net worth were more likely to report child-related educational debt than White parents and parents with no degree, low-income, or negative net worth. Among debtors, high-income parents had more debt than low-income parents.

Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle and Jennifer A. Ailshire. "Student Debt Spans Generations: Characteristics of Parents Who Borrow to Pay for Their Children's College Education." The Journals of Gerontology: Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 72,6 (October 2017): 1084-1089.
4. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Bell, Bethany A.
Frongillo, Edward A.
Body Mass Index Trajectories from Adolescence to Midlife: Differential Effects of Parental and Respondent Education by Race/Ethnicity and Gender
Ethnicity and Health 17,4 (2012): 337-362.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13557858.2011.635374
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Life Course; Parental Influences; Racial Differences; Weight

Objectives: Race/ethnicity and education are among the strongest social determinants of body mass index (BMI) throughout the life course, yet we know relatively little about how these social factors both independently and interactively contribute to the rate at which BMI changes from adolescence to midlife. The purpose of this study is to (1) examine variation in trajectories of BMI from adolescence to midlife by mothers’ and respondents’ education and (2) determine if the effects of mothers’ and respondents’ education on BMI trajectories differ by race/ethnicity and gender.

Design: We used nationally representative data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Our sample included White (n=4433), Black (n=2420), and Hispanic (n=1501) respondents. Self-reported height and weight were collected on 16 occasions from 1981 to 2008. We employed two-level linear growth models to specify BMI trajectories.

Results: Mothers' education was inversely associated with BMI and BMI change among women. Among men, mothers’ education was inversely associated with BMI; these educational disparities persisted for Whites, diminished for Blacks, and widened for Hispanics. Respondents’ education was inversely associated with BMI among women, but was positively associated with the rate of BMI change among Black women. Respondents’ education was inversely associated with BMI among White and Hispanic men, and positively associated with BMI among Black men. These educational disparities widened for White and Black men, but narrowed for Hispanic men.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that by simultaneously considering multiple sources of stratification, we can more fully understand how the unequal distribution of advantages or disadvantages across social groups affects BMI across the life course.

Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Jennifer A. Ailshire, Bethany A. Bell and Edward A. Frongillo. "Body Mass Index Trajectories from Adolescence to Midlife: Differential Effects of Parental and Respondent Education by Race/Ethnicity and Gender." Ethnicity and Health 17,4 (2012): 337-362.
5. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Fisk, Calley E.
Brown, Lauren L.
Do Gender and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Sleep Duration Emerge in Early Adulthood? Evidence from a Longitudinal Study of U.S. Adults
Sleep Medicine 36 (August 2017): 133-140.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1389945717302216
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Racial Differences; Sleep

Objective: Gender and racial/ethnic disparities in sleep duration are well documented among the U.S. adult population, but we know little about how these disparities are shaped during the early course of adult life, a period marked by substantial changes in social roles that can influence time for sleep.

Methods: Prospective data was used from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), a U.S.-based representative sample of persons born between 1980 and 1984, who were first interviewed in 1997. Sleep duration was assessed in 2002, 2007/2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011. Random-coefficient models were estimated to examine gender and racial/ethnic disparities in trajectories of sleep duration across early adulthood as a function of educational experiences, employment, and family relationships.

Results: Sleep duration declined during early adulthood. Women reported shorter sleep than men from age 18 to 22, but slept longer than men by age 28. Young adults of black race/ethnnicity reported sleep durations similar to those of young adults of white race/ethnicity until age 24, after which blacks slept less than whites. Educational experiences and employment characteristics reduced gender and racial/ethnic disparities, but family relationships exacerbated them.

Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Jennifer A. Ailshire, Calley E. Fisk and Lauren L. Brown. "Do Gender and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Sleep Duration Emerge in Early Adulthood? Evidence from a Longitudinal Study of U.S. Adults." Sleep Medicine 36 (August 2017): 133-140.
6. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Gee, Gilbert C.
Student Loans and Racial Disparities in Self-reported Sleep Duration: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of US Young Adults
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 70,1 (January 2016): 42-48.
Also: http://jech.bmj.com/content/70/1/42.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Ltd. - British Medical Journal Publishing Group
Keyword(s): College Education; Debt/Borrowing; Racial Differences; Sleep; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: Student loans are the second largest source of personal debt in the USA and may represent an important source of financial strain for many young adults. Little attention has been paid to whether debt is associated with sleep duration, an important health-promoting behaviour. We determine if student loans are associated with sleep duration. Since black young adults are more likely to have student debt and sleep less, we also consider whether this association varies by race.

Methods: Data come from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. The main analytic sample includes 4714 respondents who were ever enrolled in college and who reported on sleep duration in 2010. Most respondents had completed their college education by 2010, when respondents were 25 to 31 years old. Multivariable linear regression models assessed the cross-sectional association between student loans accumulated over the course of college and sleep duration in 2010, as well as between student debt at age 25 and sleep duration in 2010.

Results: Black young adults with greater amounts of student loans or more student debt reported shorter sleep duration, controlling for occupation, hours worked, household income, parental net worth, marital status, number of children in the household and other sociodemographic and health indicators. There was no association between student loans or debt with sleep for white or latino adults and other racial/ethnic groups.

Conclusions: Student loans may contribute to racial inequities in sleep duration. Our findings also suggest that the student debt crisis may have important implications for individuals’ sleep, specifically and public health, more broadly.

Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Jennifer A. Ailshire and Gilbert C. Gee. "Student Loans and Racial Disparities in Self-reported Sleep Duration: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of US Young Adults ." Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 70,1 (January 2016): 42-48.
7. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Hartnett, Caroline Sten
Mental Health Among Mothers and Fathers Who Borrow to Pay for Their Child's College Education
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Cost; Debt/Borrowing; Health, Mental; Parental Investments; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

More parents are borrowing to help their children pay for college. These loans may be a source of financial stress and worry, which could, in turn, impact parents' mental health. Our study investigates if child-related educational debt is associated with poorer mental health among parents and if fathers are more sensitive to this debt than mothers, given potential gender differences in who oversees the household finances and who is responsible for maintaining relationships with adult children. Data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a nationally representative sample of persons born between 1957 and 1964. We restricted our sample to parents whose biological child(ren) attended college and were interviewed at age 50, when mental health was assessed (n=3,545). Acquiring any child-related educational debt was associated with better mental health among fathers, but as the amount borrowed increased, fathers reported worse mental health. No relationship was found among mothers.
Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Jennifer A. Ailshire and Caroline Sten Hartnett. "Mental Health Among Mothers and Fathers Who Borrow to Pay for Their Child's College Education." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
8. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Hartnett, Caroline Sten
The Other Student Debt Crisis: How Borrowing to Pay for a Child's College Education Relates to Parents' Mental Health at Midlife
Journals of Gerontology: Series B published online (7 November 2019): DOI: 10.1093/geronb/gbz146.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/psychsocgerontology/advance-article/doi/10.1093/geronb/gbz146/5614290
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): College Cost; Debt/Borrowing; Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Parental Investments; Student Loans

Objectives: More parents are borrowing to help their children pay for college. These loans may be a source of financial stress and worry, which could influence parents' mental health. We determine whether child-related educational debt is associated with worse mental health among parents and if fathers are more sensitive to this debt than mothers, given potential gender differences in financial decision-making and relationships with adult children.
Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Jennifer A. Ailshire and Caroline Sten Hartnett. "The Other Student Debt Crisis: How Borrowing to Pay for a Child's College Education Relates to Parents' Mental Health at Midlife ." Journals of Gerontology: Series B published online (7 November 2019): DOI: 10.1093/geronb/gbz146.
9. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Fisk, Calley E.
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Parent and Child Factors That Predict Who Helps Young Adult Children Pay for College
Innovation in Aging 4, S1 (December 2020): 585.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/innovateage/article/4/Supplement_1/585/6036085
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): Birth Order; College Education; Grandparents; Income; Parental Investments; Tuition

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In recent decades, the cost of higher education has exceeded the pace of inflation while wages have stagnated or declined. As such, young adult children may increasingly look to their parents and other family members, including grandparents, to help them pay for college. We use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to determine who financially contributes to a young adult child's college education, restricting our sample to mid-life parents with at least one biological child who attended a 2-year or 4-year college and completed the college expenditures module in 2014 (n=3,525). For each college-going child, parents reported who paid for the student's tuition – student, parents, grandparents, other family members, or a combination of these. Using multinomial logistic regression, we will estimate who paid for college as a function of parents' social and economic characteristics when the child was 16 and the child's gender and birth order.
Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Calley E. Fisk and Jennifer A. Ailshire. "Parent and Child Factors That Predict Who Helps Young Adult Children Pay for College." Innovation in Aging 4, S1 (December 2020): 585.