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Author: Hartnett, Caroline Sten
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Hartnett, Caroline Sten
White-Hispanic Differences in Meeting Fertility Intentions over the Life Course
Presented: San Francisco CA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Ethnic Differences; Fertility; Hispanics; Life Course

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort, I explore whether higher fertility among Hispanics compared with Whites reflects the preferences of individuals within those groups, and how the process of exceeding or falling short of intentions over the life course helps explain fertility differentials between the groups. Although Hispanics come closer to achieving early-life parity intentions in the aggregate (Hispanic women fall short by a quarter of a birth, compared to more than two-fifths for Whites), at the individual level, they are not more likely to meet their intentions (34% of Hispanic women achieve their desired parity, compared with 38% of Whites). Hispanics have higher parity than Whites both because they intend to have more children and they are more likely to exceed their intended parity. Hispanic-White differences in exceeding intentions seem to be related to acculturation, religious differences, and an earlier age-schedule of childbearing.
Bibliography Citation
Hartnett, Caroline Sten. "White-Hispanic Differences in Meeting Fertility Intentions over the Life Course." Presented: San Francisco CA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 2012.
2. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Hartnett, Caroline Sten
Mental Health Among Mothers and Fathers Who Borrow to Pay for Their Child's College Education
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Cost; Debt/Borrowing; Health, Mental; Parental Investments; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

More parents are borrowing to help their children pay for college. These loans may be a source of financial stress and worry, which could, in turn, impact parents' mental health. Our study investigates if child-related educational debt is associated with poorer mental health among parents and if fathers are more sensitive to this debt than mothers, given potential gender differences in who oversees the household finances and who is responsible for maintaining relationships with adult children. Data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a nationally representative sample of persons born between 1957 and 1964. We restricted our sample to parents whose biological child(ren) attended college and were interviewed at age 50, when mental health was assessed (n=3,545). Acquiring any child-related educational debt was associated with better mental health among fathers, but as the amount borrowed increased, fathers reported worse mental health. No relationship was found among mothers.
Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Jennifer A. Ailshire and Caroline Sten Hartnett. "Mental Health Among Mothers and Fathers Who Borrow to Pay for Their Child's College Education." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.