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Source: Women and Health (from Haworth Medical Press)
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Jacknowitz, Alison
The Role of Workplace Characteristics in Breastfeeding Practices
Women and Health 47,2 (February 2008): 87-111.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03630240802092357
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Breastfeeding; Child Care; Work Hours; Working Conditions

The present analyses were undertaken to understand the role of workplace characteristics in the breastfeeding practices of working women. The effects of the perception of the availability of employer-sponsored child care, the perception of the availability of a flexible schedule, hours worked at home, and worked a fixed schedule on breastfeeding outcomes were estimated using a sample of 1,506 births from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. The availability of employer-sponsored child care increased the likelihood of breastfeeding six months after birth by 47 percent. In addition, working an additional eight hours at home per week, at the mean, increased the probability of breastfeeding initiation by 8 percent and breastfeeding six months afterbirth by 16.8 percent. Workplace characteristics show promise as an effective way to increase breastfeeding rates among working women. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Jacknowitz, Alison. "The Role of Workplace Characteristics in Breastfeeding Practices." Women and Health 47,2 (February 2008): 87-111.
2. Petterson, Stephen Mark
Friel, Lisa V.
Psychological Distress, Hopelessness and Welfare
Women and Health 32,1-2 (2001): 79-99.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J013v32n01_04
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); CESD (Depression Scale); Mothers; Parents, Single; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Welfare

This article assesses the validity of the claim that welfare in itself has deleterious psychological consequences for single mothers. The analysis compares single mothers who are recipients of AFDC with single mothers who are not recipients in terms of their depressive symptoms (as measured by the CES-D) and hopelessness (as measured by Pearlin Mastery Scale). The analysis uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the National Survey of Families and Households. The authors find that higher levels of both depression and hopelessness among welfare recipients can be explained by their material hardship rather than the stigma attached to welfare. They show that AFDC recipients report similar levels of depression and hopelessness as jobless non-recipients as well as low-wage non-recipients. An additional finding is that long-term welfare recipients do not experience greater emotional problems than short-term welfare recipients. Finally, the paper shows that feelings of hopelessness mediate the relationship between material deprivation and psychological distress for both recipients and non-recipients.
Bibliography Citation
Petterson, Stephen Mark and Lisa V. Friel. "Psychological Distress, Hopelessness and Welfare." Women and Health 32,1-2 (2001): 79-99.
3. Waldron, Ingrid
Herold, Joan
Employment, Attitudes Toward Employment, and Women's Health
Women and Health 11,1 (Summer 1986): 79-86.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J013v11n01_05
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Employment; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Self-Reporting; Women

The relationships between self-reported general health, employment, and attitudes toward the employment of married women have been analyzed for a representative sample of married, middle-aged women in the United States. The cross-sectional data indicate that women who were in the labor force had better health than women who were out of the labor force. In addition, women whose labor force status was compatible with their attitudes toward employment tended to have better health than women for whom there was a discrepancy between labor force status and attitudes. Analyses of the longitudinal data indicate that several causal mechanisms contributed to the relationships observed in the cross-sectional data. For the women with favorable attitudes toward employment, it appears that being a housewife had more detrimental effects on health than being employed. In contrast, for the women with unfavorable or neutral attitudes toward employment, it appears that employment status did not affect health. Being employed may have contributed to more favorable attitudes toward employment for healthy women, who were more likely than unhealthy women to stay in the labor force. Thus, it appears that there are multiple causal relationships linking employment status, attitudes toward employment and women's health.
Bibliography Citation
Waldron, Ingrid and Joan Herold. "Employment, Attitudes Toward Employment, and Women's Health." Women and Health 11,1 (Summer 1986): 79-86.
4. Waldron, Ingrid
Herold, Joan
Dunn, Dennis
How Valid are Self-Report Measures for Evaluating Relationships Between Women's Health and Labor Force Participation?
Women and Health 7,2 (Summer 1982): 53-66.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J013v07n02_06
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Disabled Workers; Employment; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Status; Mortality; Self-Reporting; Unemployment; Work History

For a sample of white women aged 45-64, women who were out of the labor force had poorer self-reported health and higher mortality than women who were in the labor force. It has been hypothesized that women who are out of the labor force may tend to exaggerate their poor health in self-report data. However, no evidence of bias of this type was found in an analysis of the relationships between self-reported health and subsequent mortality. The validity of self-reports of illness as a reason for not seeking work has been assessed using data for a sample of 30-44 year old women who were out of the labor force. Over 90% of the women who gave illness or disability as their main reason for not seeking work had previous or contemporaneous independent, self-report evidence of poor health. The findings of this study and previous evidence indicate that poor health reduces the likelihood that a woman will join the labor force, and this is a major reason why women who are not in the labor force have poorer health than those who are in the labor force.
Bibliography Citation
Waldron, Ingrid, Joan Herold and Dennis Dunn. "How Valid are Self-Report Measures for Evaluating Relationships Between Women's Health and Labor Force Participation?" Women and Health 7,2 (Summer 1982): 53-66.
5. Waldron, Ingrid
Jacobs, Jerry A.
Effects of Multiple Roles on Women's Health- Evidence from a National Longitudinal Study
Women and Health 15,1 (1989): 3-19.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J013v15n01_02
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Children; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Marital Status; Women's Roles

This study analyzes data from the NLS of Mature Women in order to assess the health effects of three roles -- labor force participant, spouse, and parent. Women who held more roles had better health trends. The effect of each specific role varied, depending on race and the other roles a woman held. For example, it appears that labor force participation had beneficial effects on health for white women who were not married and for black women with children at home, but not for other women. The findings do not support the hypothesis that involvement in multiple roles contributes to role strain and consequent harmful effects on women's health. Rather, it appears that involvement in multiple roles generally contributed to better health, due to the beneficial effects of labor force participation and marriage for some women.
Bibliography Citation
Waldron, Ingrid and Jerry A. Jacobs. "Effects of Multiple Roles on Women's Health- Evidence from a National Longitudinal Study." Women and Health 15,1 (1989): 3-19.