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Author: Jacknowitz, Alison
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Jacknowitz, Alison
An Investigation of the Factors Influencing Breastfeeding Patterns
Ph.D. Dissertation, Pardee RAND Graduate School (PRGS), 2004.
Also: http://www.rand.org/pubs/rgs_dissertations/2005/RAND_RGSD182.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: RAND
Keyword(s): Breastfeeding; Child Care; Maternal Employment

A growing body of research indicates that both mothers and children benefit from breastfeeding. However, despite slowly rising breastfeeding rates, a large fraction of mothers do not breastfeed or breastfeed for a shorter period than the recommended six months. Furthermore, some groups of mothers are more likely to breastfeed than others. This dissertation seeks to understand these breastfeeding patterns by investigating demographic changes, welfare work requirements, and workplace characteristics. Among the results: Changes in the composition of births by maternal age, maternal education, race/ethnicity, parity, and geographic location of birth explain seem to explain approximately 20 percent of the increasing trends in initial breastfeeding rates and breastfeeding rates six months after birth. In the absence of welfare reform, the national breastfeeding rate six months after birth would have been 5.5 percent higher in 2000. Such unintended negative consequences of these welfare work requirements must be weighed against potential benefits as states refine their welfare programs. The availability of employer-sponsored child care increases the likelihood of breastfeeding six months after birth by 59 percent. Working an additional eight hours at home per week increases the probability of breastfeeding by 9 and 21 percent at birth and six months after birth, respectively. Workplace characteristics show promise to effectively increase breastfeeding rates among working women and warrant additional consideration.
Bibliography Citation
Jacknowitz, Alison. An Investigation of the Factors Influencing Breastfeeding Patterns. Ph.D. Dissertation, Pardee RAND Graduate School (PRGS), 2004..
2. Jacknowitz, Alison
The Role of Workplace Characteristics in Breastfeeding Practices
Women and Health 47,2 (February 2008): 87-111.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03630240802092357
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Breastfeeding; Child Care; Work Hours; Working Conditions

The present analyses were undertaken to understand the role of workplace characteristics in the breastfeeding practices of working women. The effects of the perception of the availability of employer-sponsored child care, the perception of the availability of a flexible schedule, hours worked at home, and worked a fixed schedule on breastfeeding outcomes were estimated using a sample of 1,506 births from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. The availability of employer-sponsored child care increased the likelihood of breastfeeding six months after birth by 47 percent. In addition, working an additional eight hours at home per week, at the mean, increased the probability of breastfeeding initiation by 8 percent and breastfeeding six months afterbirth by 16.8 percent. Workplace characteristics show promise as an effective way to increase breastfeeding rates among working women. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Jacknowitz, Alison. "The Role of Workplace Characteristics in Breastfeeding Practices." Women and Health 47,2 (February 2008): 87-111.