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Source: Population and Development Review
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Geronimus, Arline T.
Korenman, Sanders D.
Hillemeier, Marianne M.
Does Young Maternal Age Adversely Affect Child Development? Evidence from Cousin Comparisons in the United States
Population and Development Review 20,3 (September 1994): 585-609
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Council
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Development; Childbearing, Adolescent; Disadvantaged, Economically; General Assessment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Mothers, Adolescent; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Siblings; Socioeconomic Factors; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Verbal Memory (McCarthy Scale)

The construction of teenage childbearing as a public problem, and the degree to which it should be a source of social or policy concern, have been the subject of numerous empirical investigations, theoretical analyses, commentaries, and controversy. While we do not review this literature in detail here, we highlight what we believe to be the most important theoretical tension and social scientific question to emerge from it. The theoretical tension is between whether teenage mothers are best understood as teenagers or as socioeconomically disadvantaged women, given the overrepresentation of socioeconomically disadvantaged teenagers among the ranks of teenage mothers. The social scientific question is the extent to which teen childbearing contributes causally to the social problems with which it is associated. One important area of social concern is the potential consequences of teen childbearing for offspring. In this article, we focus on early childhood development. The literature on child development in the United States has documented that, on average, children of young mothers score more poorly on cognitive and socioemotional measures and are at higher risk of poor school achievement than children of older mothers. While some investigators do not control for socioeconomic status when comparing child outcomes across maternal ages, many do take socioeconomic differences into account.
Bibliography Citation
Geronimus, Arline T., Sanders D. Korenman and Marianne M. Hillemeier. "Does Young Maternal Age Adversely Affect Child Development? Evidence from Cousin Comparisons in the United States." Population and Development Review 20,3 (September 1994): 585-609.
2. Morgan, S. Philip
Rackin, Heather
The Correspondence Between Fertility Intentions and Behavior in the United States
Population and Development Review 36,1 (March 2010): 91-118.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1728-4457.2010.00319.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Council
Keyword(s): Birth Rate; Expectations/Intentions; Family Size; Fertility; Life Course; Marital Status

Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we describe the correspondence between intended family size and observed fertility for US men and women in the 1957-64 birth cohorts. Mean fertility intentions calculated from reports given in the mid-20s modestly overstate completed fertility. But discrepancies between stated intent and actual fertility are common--the stated intent at age 24 (for both women and men) is more likely to miss than to match completed fertility. We focus on factors that predict which women and men will have fewer or more children than intended. Consistent with life-course arguments, those unmarried, childless, or (for women) still in school at approximately age 24 were most likely to underachieve their intended parity (i.e., had fewer children than intended at age 24). We discuss how such discrepancies between intentions and behavior may cumulate to produce sizable cross-group fertility differences. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Morgan, S. Philip and Heather Rackin. "The Correspondence Between Fertility Intentions and Behavior in the United States." Population and Development Review 36,1 (March 2010): 91-118.
3. Scott, Mindy E.
Steward-Streng, Nicole R.
Barry, Megan C.
Neighborhood, Family and School Environments: Associations with the Timing of Adolescent First Sex
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Council
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Age at First Marriage; Family Environment; Geocoded Data; Neighborhood Effects; School Quality

A major focus of policy and research is on delaying the timing of first sex to help reduce high rates of teenage pregnancy and STDs in the U.S. This study uses data from Rounds 1-8 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) to examine whether and how different adolescent environments including neighborhood, family, school, and the surrounding physical environment are associated with an earlier timing of first sex. We also examine whether micro-level factors (e.g., parent involvement) are more or less protective against early sexual experience in more disadvantaged neighborhoods. County-level indicators of neighborhood disadvantage (e.g., poverty, unemployment, single motherhood, educational attainment) are used. Preliminary results suggest that many contexts matter for the timing of adolescent sex (e.g., neighborhood, parent involvement, family structure, youth's perceptions of their school and physical environments, parent background) and that these contexts vary depending on the level of neighborhood disadvantage.
Bibliography Citation
Scott, Mindy E., Nicole R. Steward-Streng and Megan C. Barry. "Neighborhood, Family and School Environments: Associations with the Timing of Adolescent First Sex." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
4. Sironi, Maria
Furstenberg, Frank
Trends in the Economic Independence of Young Adults in the United States: 1973–2007
Population and Development Review 38,4 (December 2012): 609-630.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1728-4457.2012.00529.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Population Council
Keyword(s): Economic Independence; Economic Well-Being; Employment; Transition, Adulthood

One of the major milestones of adulthood is achieving economic independence. Without sufficient income, young people have difficulty leaving their childhood home, establishing a union, or having children—or they do so at great peril. Using the National Longitudinal Survey, this article compares the employment and economic circumstances of young adults aged 22–30 in 1973, 1987, and 2007, and their possible determinants. The results show that achieving economic independence is more difficult now than it was in the late 1980s and especially in the 1970s, even for the older age groups (age 27–28). The deterioration is more evident among men. From the 1970s there has been convergence in the trajectories for the achievement of economic self-sufficiency between men and women, suggesting that the increase in gender parity, especially in education and labor market outcomes, is making their opportunities to be employed and to earn good wages more similar. This convergence also suggests that union formation increasingly may depend on a capacity to combine men's and women's wages.
Bibliography Citation
Sironi, Maria and Frank Furstenberg. "Trends in the Economic Independence of Young Adults in the United States: 1973–2007." Population and Development Review 38,4 (December 2012): 609-630.