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Author: Gibson-Davis, Christina
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Rackin, Heather M.
Gibson-Davis, Christina
Early-life and Recent Mortality and Fertility Timing
Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Fertility; Mortality; Trauma/Death in family

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Demographic and sociological theory suggest that early childbearing may be an adaptive response to dangerous and high mortality environments but no research has examined the association between timing of first birth and individual-level experiences that make mortality salient. This study allows for an examination if, when, and what types of mortality are associated with increased risk of first birth. Here I examine these associations in a representative sample of young US women. Using data from women in the NLSY97 (N=3,553), I find that witnessing a shooting in early-life and experiencing the death of a mother in sibling in the past two years increases the risk of first birth. These effects persist even after controlling on a host of potential confounders (e.g., early-life socioeconomic status, personal socioeconomic status, and romantic partnerships). These findings suggest experiencing a mortality salient event or perceiving a high risk of early death are important predictors of young childbearing.
Bibliography Citation
Rackin, Heather M. and Christina Gibson-Davis. "Early-life and Recent Mortality and Fertility Timing." Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2019.
2. Rackin, Heather
Gibson-Davis, Christina
In Search of a New Family Form: The Distribution and Duration of Shotgun Cohabitation
Presented: Atlanta GA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; First Birth; Marital Status; Marriage; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Shotgun marriage in which a marital union occurred post-conception but pre-birth has largely disappeared from the family formation landscape. Here, we identify a new type of relationship that may have supplanted shotgun marriage: shotgun cohabitation, in which couples began cohabiting after conception but prior to the birth. We use data from the first ten rounds of the National Longitudinal Survey 1997 (NLS97) to analyze household relationship types at the time of a first birth. We find that 12% of parents are in a shotgun cohabitation relationship, compared to 6% in a shotgun marriage. Shotgun cohabitations also account for nearly one-quarter of all unions. Contrary to expectations, relationships which began as a result of a pregnancy were not more likely to dissolve than relationships that did not. However, both shot-gun cohabitations and cohabitations that existed before a birth dissolved much faster than both types of marriages.
Bibliography Citation
Rackin, Heather and Christina Gibson-Davis. "In Search of a New Family Form: The Distribution and Duration of Shotgun Cohabitation." Presented: Atlanta GA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2010.
3. Rackin, Heather
Gibson-Davis, Christina
The Role of Pre- and Postconception Relationships for First-Time Parents
Journal of Marriage and Family 74,3 (June 2012): 526-539.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2012.00974.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Cohabitation; Marital Status

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, a nationally representative cohort of young adults, the authors analyzed relationship type at the time of a first birth (N = 4,044). More than 10% of births were to a postconception cohabiting household (cohabitations that were initiated between conception and birth), a higher proportion of births than those born to postconception married households. Individuals in postconception and preconception cohabiting relationships (cohabitations that existed prior to conception) were demographically similar; both groups were associated with lower levels of socioeconomic advantage relative to those in preconception and postconception marriage. Postconception and preconception cohabiting relationships were associated with similar levels of dissolution, as 40% dissolved within 3 years of a child's birth. Having a marital union, rather than whether relationship was established pre- or postconception, was more strongly associated with who selected into the relationship and how long the relationship lasted.
Bibliography Citation
Rackin, Heather and Christina Gibson-Davis. "The Role of Pre- and Postconception Relationships for First-Time Parents." Journal of Marriage and Family 74,3 (June 2012): 526-539.