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Author: Sironi, Maria
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Billari, Francesco
Sironi, Maria
Internet and the Timing of Births
Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Computer Use; Fertility

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Technological innovations directly related to fertility have been explicitly linked to the timing of births, i.e. with postponement in the case of contraceptive technology and with "recuperation" in the case of assisted reproductive technology. We argue that the diffusion of the Internet also plays a role as an "enabling" factor in fertility choices, with a potential effect on the timing of fertility. After discussing the pathways, we hypothesize Internet access to contribute to lowering fertility in earlier ages and stages of the life course, and to raising fertility in later ages and stages of the life course. We also hypothesize that these age- and stage-specific effects are stratified by gender and socioeconomic status. We conduct analyses using longitudinal data from the US (NLSY97) to assess these hypotheses.
Bibliography Citation
Billari, Francesco and Maria Sironi. "Internet and the Timing of Births." Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016.
2. Mendola, Daria
Sironi, Maria
Aassve, Arnstein
A Cohort Perspective of Youth Poverty in the United States
Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Poverty; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The aim of this paper is to study the degree of poverty persistence of American young adults and its evolution. Using data from NLSY79 and NLSY97, respectively, we compared two cohorts followed along eight years (in the 1980s and in the 2000s) to assess which socio-economic characteristics preserve them to fall in chronic poverty or determine the duration and severity of this detrimental experience.

(Note: Also presented in Budapest, Hungary, European Population Conference, June 2014)

Bibliography Citation
Mendola, Daria, Maria Sironi and Arnstein Aassve. "A Cohort Perspective of Youth Poverty in the United States." Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015.
3. Sironi, Maria
The Transition to Adulthood in the Developed Western World: A Focus on the Achievement of Economic Independence and on the Role of Family Background
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Economic Independence; Family Background; Socioeconomic Background; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The second half of the twentieth century has been characterized by substantial changes in demographic behaviors. Among these transformations also the process by which adolescents and teenagers transition to adulthood has changed greatly in many countries of the Western world. All the events of the transition to adulthood have been delayed and life course trajectories became more diverse. There are some aspects concerning the mentioned changes that have not been extensively studied in the literature. This dissertation is a collection of three papers that have the aim to investigate these neglected aspects concerning life course trajectories of young adults. In particular, the first two papers look at trends over time in the achievement of economic independence, a crucial event in the transition to adulthood that has not received enough attention so far. The first paper is a cross-national comparison describing the situation in six different developed societies. The second paper studies only the United States, going back to the 1970s and tracing changes over time until 2007. The third paper, instead, focuses on the role of parental social class in the transition to adulthood. The exact mechanisms by which socio-economic status affects the transition to economic self-sufficiency and family formation are largely unknown. A better understanding of these issues can highlight additional information to understand why and how the transition to adulthood has changed in the last five decades.

Analyses were carried out using survey data from the Luxemburg Income Study (LIS), the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS, NLSY79, NLSY97), and the Multipurpose ISTAT (FSS 2003). A first main finding of this study is that the transition to economic independence has been delayed together with all the other events of the transition to adulthood. This process has occurred in all developed Western countries even if with some differences. A second finding is that parental social class can explain some of the variation in life courses, and that a higher social class is associated with a postponement in the transition. Also the role of family background, however, differentiates based on welfare state regimes, institutions, and the strength of family ties.

Bibliography Citation
Sironi, Maria. The Transition to Adulthood in the Developed Western World: A Focus on the Achievement of Economic Independence and on the Role of Family Background. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, 2013.
4. Sironi, Maria
Barban, Nicola
Impicciatore, Roberto
Parental Social Class and the Transition to Adulthood in Italy and the United States
Advances in Life Course Research 26 (December 2015): 89-104.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1040260815000532
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Cross-national Analysis; Italy/Italian Social Surveys; Parental Influences; Socioeconomic Background; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Transition, Adulthood

Compared to older cohorts, young adults in developed societies delay their transition to adulthood. Yet within cohorts, variations in timing and sequencing of events still remain. A major determinant of life course differences is social class. This characteristic can influence the sequence of events in terms of socioeconomic inequalities through a different availability of opportunities for social mobility. Several studies show that in North America, a higher familial status tends to decrease the complexity of trajectories, while the opposite effect has been found in Southern Europe.

This research examines the sequence of transitions, highlighting in a comparative perspective how life trajectories are influenced by parental social class in the United States and Italy. The main result of the analysis is that the effect of parental status is in fact different across countries, however in an unforeseen way based on what the literature on the topic has found so far.

Bibliography Citation
Sironi, Maria, Nicola Barban and Roberto Impicciatore. "Parental Social Class and the Transition to Adulthood in Italy and the United States." Advances in Life Course Research 26 (December 2015): 89-104.
5. Sironi, Maria
Barban, Nicola
Impicciatore, Roberto
The Role of Parental Social Class in the Transition to Adulthood: a Sequence Analysis Approach in Italy and the United States
Presented: Busan, Republic of Korea, IUSSP International Population Conference, August 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP)
Keyword(s): Cross-national Analysis; Economic Independence; Family Background; Italy/Italian Social Surveys; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In comparison to older cohorts, younger men and women in the developed societies delay their transition to adulthood and follow more complex trajectories. However, within cohorts there remain variations in timing and sequencing of events. Two of the major determinants of life course events related to transition to adulthood, and in particular family formation, are gender and social class. These two characteristics can influence the sequence of events characterizing the transition to adulthood in terms of socioeconomic inequalities through a different availability of opportunities for social mobility. Several studies show that in North America, a higher familiar status tends to decrease the complexity of trajectories or, in other words, to push towards a more "traditional" pattern, i.e. a trajectory in which the end of education and the first job precedes union formation, which in turn precedes parenthood. On the other hand, it has been highlighted that in Europe the familiar status has a different effect with an increasing complexity among higher status. The aim of the research is to examine in details the sequences of transitions highlighting, in a comparative perspective, how the life trajectories are influenced by parental social class and gender in the US and Italy.
Bibliography Citation
Sironi, Maria, Nicola Barban and Roberto Impicciatore. "The Role of Parental Social Class in the Transition to Adulthood: a Sequence Analysis Approach in Italy and the United States." Presented: Busan, Republic of Korea, IUSSP International Population Conference, August 2013.
6. Sironi, Maria
Billari, Francesco
Stay with Mommy and Daddy or Move Out? Consequences of the Age at Leaving Home in the United States
Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Employment; Residence; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Leaving the parental home is a milestone in the transition to adulthood. Changes over time in the timing of leaving and the increasing share of young adults who return back home have been well documented. However, there is little research investigating the consequences of the timing and pathway of leaving home. We address this gap, examining the relationship between the timing and pathway of leaving home and economic and employment outcomes in early thirties. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97), taking advantage of its longitudinal design and study young Americans born between 1980 and 1984, who are 27-31 years old in 2011. We find that the higher the age at leaving home the better are the working and especially the economic conditions of individuals between 27 and 31 years of age, albeit with a potential reversal of the effect at later ages of leaving home.
Bibliography Citation
Sironi, Maria and Francesco Billari. "Stay with Mommy and Daddy or Move Out? Consequences of the Age at Leaving Home in the United States." Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015.
7. Sironi, Maria
Furstenberg, Frank
Trends in the Economic Independence of Young Adults in the United States: 1973–2007
Population and Development Review 38,4 (December 2012): 609-630.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1728-4457.2012.00529.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Population Council
Keyword(s): Economic Independence; Economic Well-Being; Employment; Transition, Adulthood

One of the major milestones of adulthood is achieving economic independence. Without sufficient income, young people have difficulty leaving their childhood home, establishing a union, or having children—or they do so at great peril. Using the National Longitudinal Survey, this article compares the employment and economic circumstances of young adults aged 22–30 in 1973, 1987, and 2007, and their possible determinants. The results show that achieving economic independence is more difficult now than it was in the late 1980s and especially in the 1970s, even for the older age groups (age 27–28). The deterioration is more evident among men. From the 1970s there has been convergence in the trajectories for the achievement of economic self-sufficiency between men and women, suggesting that the increase in gender parity, especially in education and labor market outcomes, is making their opportunities to be employed and to earn good wages more similar. This convergence also suggests that union formation increasingly may depend on a capacity to combine men's and women's wages.
Bibliography Citation
Sironi, Maria and Frank Furstenberg. "Trends in the Economic Independence of Young Adults in the United States: 1973–2007." Population and Development Review 38,4 (December 2012): 609-630.
8. Sironi, Maria
Kashyap, Ridhi
Internet Access and Partnership Formation in the United States
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Computer Use; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Dating; Marriage; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Unlike older communication technologies, the internet has broadened the scope for social interaction and enabled people to meet with people outside their existing social network. This feature of the technology is perhaps most salient for its role in helping people search for mates. While the internet may enlarge the pool of prospective partners, access to a larger pool may also delay the transition to partnership as the option for alternatives may induce individuals to search longer. We examine this effect of the internet on both heterosexual and homosexual partnership formation using nationally-representative data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the Current Population Survey from the US. We find that while the effect of the internet on the transition to partnership is negative at younger ages, the effect of the internet on increasing the propensity to partner becomes positive as individuals become older, for both homosexual and heterosexual partnerships.
Bibliography Citation
Sironi, Maria and Ridhi Kashyap. "Internet Access and Partnership Formation in the United States." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.