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Source: Journal of Studies on Alcohol
Resulting in 15 citations.
1. Curran, Patrick J.
Harford, Thomas C.
Muthen, Bengt O.
The Relation Between Heavy Alcohol Use and Bar Patronage: A Latent Growth Model
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 57,4 (July 1996): 410-418.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/The_Relation_between_Heavy_Alcohol_Use_and_Bar_Patronage_A_Latent_Growth_M/339.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Gender Differences; Hispanics; Marital Status; Modeling; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Racial Differences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth on 3,071 Ss age 21+ (38% female, 18% black, 13% Hispanic, ∧ 69% Caucasian) were used to estimate models for heavy alcohol use and bar patronage, 1982-1984. Random effects latent growth models indicate that both heavy alcohol use and bar patronage had downward growth trajectories over time, with males reporting higher levels of both at initial interview and smaller decreases over time. Bar patronage tended to encourage heavy alcohol use, particularly among singles & males. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics reported lower levels of bar patronage & blacks reported lower levels of both heavy alcohol use & bar patronage. 2 Tables, 4 Figures, 34 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1997, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Curran, Patrick J., Thomas C. Harford and Bengt O. Muthen. "The Relation Between Heavy Alcohol Use and Bar Patronage: A Latent Growth Model ." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 57,4 (July 1996): 410-418.
2. Curran, Patrick J.
Muthen, Bengt O.
Harford, Thomas C.
The Influence of Changes in Marital Status on Developmental Trajectories of Alcohol Use In Young Adults
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 59,6 (November 1998): 647-658.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/The_Influence_of_Changes_in_Marital_Status_on_Developmental_Trajectories_of/561.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Education; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Marital Disruption; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Racial Differences; Variables, Independent - Covariate; Youth Problems

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVE: Multiple group latent curve analysis was used to assess the impact of changes in marital status on alcohol use trajectories in young adults and to test if these effects varied across ethnicity and gender. METHOD: Four years of data were obtained from a sample of young adults (N = 4,052; 54% male) drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Alcohol use and marital status were assessed once per year and covariates included age, gender, education and ethnicity. RESULTS: Latent curve models indicated that there was an overall nonlinear negative alcohol use trajectory across the four time points and that becoming married was reliably associated with an added down-turn to this trajectory. Multiple group models indicated that there was an interaction between ethnicity and marital status in the prediction of alcohol growth trajectories, but there was no interaction with gender. CONCLUSIONS: Becoming married for the first time exerted a unique effect on the overall developmental trajectory of alcohol use over time. This effect held for both ethnic groups but was reliably stronger for white compared to black respondents. This interaction may be attributable to lower levels of alcohol use reported by black respondents, or may be related to individual differences in reactivity to social influences by blacks relative to whites.
Bibliography Citation
Curran, Patrick J., Bengt O. Muthen and Thomas C. Harford. "The Influence of Changes in Marital Status on Developmental Trajectories of Alcohol Use In Young Adults." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 59,6 (November 1998): 647-658.
3. Dooley, David
Prause, JoAnn
Underemployment and Alcohol Misuse in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 59,6 (November 1998): 669-680.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Underemployment_and_Alcohol_Misuse_in_the_National_Longitudinal_Survey_of_Y/563.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Economic Changes/Recession; Employment, Part-Time; Marital Status; Poverty; Underemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVE: This study measured the impact of unemployment and underemployment on alcohol misuse.

METHOD: A panel of respondents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth was studied in 1984-85 and 1988-89. In each pair of years, the effect of employment change (e.g., becoming underemployed) on alcohol misuse was assessed controlling for misuse in the first year. Alcohol misuse was operationalized in two ways: elevated symptoms and heavy drinking. Three samples were analyzed: a core sample of 2,441 who were available in both pairs of years (approximately 65% male) and two extended samples that included everyone available in one pair of years but not the other (n = 4,183 in 1984-85 and n = 3,926 in 1988-89).

RESULTS: The 1984-85 analyses revealed a significant association of adverse change in employment with both elevated alcohol symptoms and heavy drinking (the latter moderated by prior heavy drinking). The 1988-89 analyses found no relationship between adverse change in employment and heavy drinking in the core sample and no main effect of adverse change in employment on symptoms, but they did reveal interactions involving prior symptoms (core sample) and marital status (extended sample).

CONCLUSIONS: Several explanations for these decreasing effects over time were considered including changes in measurement reliability, statistical power, economic environment and respondents' maturity. These results confirm previous findings that job loss can increase the risk of alcohol misuse, provide new evidence that two types of underemployment (involuntary part-time and poverty-level wage) can also increase this risk and suggest that these effects vary over time.

Bibliography Citation
Dooley, David and JoAnn Prause. "Underemployment and Alcohol Misuse in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 59,6 (November 1998): 669-680.
4. Grant, Bridget F.
Harford, Thomas C.
Grigson, M. Beth
Stability of Alcohol Consumption Among Youth--A National Longitudinal Study
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 49,3 (1988): 253-260.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Stability_of_Alcohol_Consumption_among_Youth_A_National_Longitudinal_Surve/3800.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior; Gender Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The present study draws upon the National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) of Labor Market Experience in Youth (ages 17-24) to describe alcohol use patterns over a 2year period during the transition years between adolescence and young adulthood. Specifically, turnover in current and heavier drinking levels among panel members was examined by charting incidence, remission, chronicity, and abstinence between 1982 and 1983. The prevalence of each consumption level increased between the ages of 17 and 22 but declined thereafter for each sex until the age of 24. Changes in prevalence from 1982 to 1983 were shown to be a function of changes in drinking level status. The analysis of turnover in current and heavier drinking levels indicated that there was continuity in drinking behavior over time. Sex differences were examined and their implications to internal and external age- and sex- appropriate constraints and paradigmatic development were explicated.
Bibliography Citation
Grant, Bridget F., Thomas C. Harford and M. Beth Grigson. "Stability of Alcohol Consumption Among Youth--A National Longitudinal Study." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 49,3 (1988): 253-260.
5. Harford, Thomas C.
Muthen, Bengt O.
Adolescent and Young Adult Antisocial Behavior and Adult Alcohol Use Disorders: A Fourteen-Year Prospective Follow-Up in a National Survey
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 61,4 (July 2000): 524-528.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Adolescent_and_Young_Adult_Antisocial_Behavior_and_Adult_Alcohol_Use_Disord/783.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Problems; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Modeling; Teenagers; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Author: Objective: Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) are used to examine the association between antisocial behaviors (ASB) reported in youth (15-22 years old) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) 14 years later in a large (N = 7,326) representative national sample. Method: Structural equation modeling generalized to dichotomous outcomes was used to assess the associations between latent variables of ASB with latent variables of AUD and background variables. Results: Exploratory factor analysis of 17 ASB items yielded three factors having clear interpretations with the literature-property offenses, person offenses and illicit substance involvement. When examined in the context of the multivariate structural equation model, several independent associations between ASB and AUD symptoms and covariates were found. Although there were significant and independent effects for each ASB factor on each of the alcohol use disorder factors, the strength of the association was strongest for the effects of early illicit substance involvement on alcohol abuse and dependence. Conclusions: Both illicit substance involvement and delinquency other than illicit substance involvement reported in 1980 were associated with alcohol use disorders 14 years later. (J. Stud. Alcohol 61: 524-528, 2000)
Bibliography Citation
Harford, Thomas C. and Bengt O. Muthen. "Adolescent and Young Adult Antisocial Behavior and Adult Alcohol Use Disorders: A Fourteen-Year Prospective Follow-Up in a National Survey." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 61,4 (July 2000): 524-528.
6. Harford, Thomas C.
Muthen, Bengt O.
Alcohol Use Among College Students: The Effects of Prior Problem Behaviors and Change of Residence
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 62,3 (May 2001): 306-312.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Alcohol_Use_among_College_Students_The_Effects_of_Prior_Problem_Behaviors_/1387.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavioral Problems; Educational Status; High School; Residence; Substance Use; Variables, Independent - Covariate; Youth Problems

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This article examines the relationship between prior problem behaviors and change in residence on alcohol use patterns among college students. Method: Measures of alcohol consumption (e.g., drinking frequency, average consumption and frequency of heavy episodic drinking) were related to residence patterns and prior problem behaviors (e.g., conduct problems, illicit substance involvement and early age at onset of alcohol consumption). Subjects (N = 2,465; 51% women) were a subsample drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Labor Market Experience in Youth. The analysis was conducted using a linear growth model for continuous outcomes with time-invariant and time-varying covariates for each of the drinking measures. Results: The results of the structural equation analysis yielded significant and direct effects related to residence patterns and prior problem behaviors. Problem behaviors were related to drinking measures; however, there was no evidence for a mediational hypothesis. Neither was there systematic evidence that the relationship between prior problem behavior and alcohol use was mediated by residence patterns. The analysis of change in residence was related to both time-specific and longer-term influences on alcohol use. Conclusions: The presence of direct and independent effects for both dispositional and high-risk environmental factors in collegiate drinking practices support targeted and diverse strategies for prevention activities. [Copyright © 2004 Thomson ISI]
Bibliography Citation
Harford, Thomas C. and Bengt O. Muthen. "Alcohol Use Among College Students: The Effects of Prior Problem Behaviors and Change of Residence." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 62,3 (May 2001): 306-312.
7. Harford, Thomas C.
Muthen, Bengt O.
The Dimensionality of Alcohol Abuse and Dependence: A Multivariate Analysis of DSM-IV Symptom Items in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 62,2 (March 2001): 150-157.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/The_Dimensionality_of_Alcohol_Abuse_and_Dependence_A_Multivariate_Analysis/1403.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; Educational Status; Family History; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Modeling, Multilevel; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVE: This article examines the factor structure of 22 symptom items used to configure the criteria of DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) alcohol abuse and dependence and relates the factor structure to background characteristics. METHOD: Data for this study were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Labor Market Experience in Youth (NLSY). The symptom items were related to the covariates using the statistical technique of structural equation modeling generalized to dichotomous outcomes. The present model is a special case of structural equation modeling, a multiple causes and multiple indicators (MIMIC) model, in which one or more latent variables (i.e., alcohol abuse and dependence) intervene between a set of observed background variables predicting a set of observed response variables (i.e., DSM-IV symptom items). RESULTS: The results of the structural equation analysis provide further support for two dimensions underlying the DSM-IV symptom items. Although the two-factor dimension bore a strong resemblance to the DSM-IV conceptions of abuse and dependence, there were notable differences in the item content of the symptom items for each dimension. The dependence dimension drew upon items related to the abuse criteria for continued drinking despite social problems and recurrent drinking resulting in failure to fulfill role obligations. The abuse dimension drew upon items related to the abuse criterion for hazardous drinking and the dependence criterion for larger amounts over time. The two factors were shown to have different relationships to the background variables. Alcohol dependence was related to family history of alcoholism and educational status. Age was not related to dependence and inversely related to alcohol abuse. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study replicate the two-dimensional model for DSM-IV criteria found in other studies and provide further support for the validity of alcohol dependence i n general population samples. A major implication of the factor structure in the present study relates to the different classification of cases that would otherwise be obtained with DSM-IV criteria. These departures were shown to affect abuse, which retained only 40% of DSM-IV diagnoses, more strongly than dependence, which retained 91% of DSM-IV diagnoses.
Bibliography Citation
Harford, Thomas C. and Bengt O. Muthen. "The Dimensionality of Alcohol Abuse and Dependence: A Multivariate Analysis of DSM-IV Symptom Items in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 62,2 (March 2001): 150-157.
8. Harford, Thomas C.
Yi, Hsiao-Ye
Hilton, Michael E.
Alcohol Abuse and Dependence in College and Noncollege Samples: A Ten-Year Prospective Follow-Up in a National Survey
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 67,6 (November 2006): 803-808.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Alcohol_Abuse_and_Dependence_in_College_and_Noncollege_Samples_A_TenYear_/1529.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior, Antisocial; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Demography; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; Health, Mental; High School Dropouts; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This prospective study examines the association of educational status in 1984 and the risk for past-year Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), alcohol-use disorders (AUDs) in 1994, 10 years later. Method: A sample of 8,661 respondents was drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience in Youth. Measures included baseline heavy episodic drinking, alcohol-dependence symptoms, early problem behaviors (antisocial behaviors, illicit substance use, family history of alcoholism, and age at onset of alcohol use), demographic characteristics (gender, race/ethnicity, age, marital status), and 1994 assessment for past-year DSM-IV AUDs. Results: Findings from this 10-year prospective study indicate that education beyond high school had a protective effect for alcohol dependence, and dropping Out of high school resulted in an elevated long-term risk for alcohol dependence. These associations remained significant when other early behavioral problems were included in the models. Conclusions: The risk of alcohol dependence and, consequently, the need for appropriately tailored prevention efforts is greater among high school dropouts and college nonattenders than among college students, although much of the current literature has focused on the latter.
Bibliography Citation
Harford, Thomas C., Hsiao-Ye Yi and Michael E. Hilton. "Alcohol Abuse and Dependence in College and Noncollege Samples: A Ten-Year Prospective Follow-Up in a National Survey." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 67,6 (November 2006): 803-808.
9. Kerr, William C.
Fillmore, Kaye Middleton
Bostrom, Alan
Stability of Alcohol Consumption over Time: Evidence from Three Longitudinal Surveys from the United States
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 63,3 (May 2002): 325-333.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Stability_of_Alcohol_Consumption_over_Time_Evidence_from_Three_Longitudina/1291.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Data Analysis; Modeling; Mortality; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES); Statistical Analysis

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: To assess the stability of individual monthly alcohol consumption volume in three studies from the United States: The first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with three measurements; The Framingham Offspring and Spouse Cohort with four measurements; and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth with six measurements. The results will aid in the interpretation of studies that assess consumption at one point only. Method: Five analyses measure (1) the amount of change between measurements, (2) the correlation between reported consumption, (3) patterns of later drinking by the baseline group, (4) mean consumption of abstainers when they drink and heavy drinkers when not drinking heavily and (5) the strength of past consumption in predicting present consumption. Results: Correlations between measurements are high for adult samples 5 years apart or less but low for longer follow-ups and younger samples. Heavy drinkers are much less stable than abstainers or moderate drinkers. Abstainers at one time who drink at another drink much less than the mean. One time heavy drinkers are close to the consumption mean of the entire sample when not heavy but two or more time heavy drinkers drink more than the mean when not heavy. An autoregressive, rather than Markov, model of consumption change is supported. Conclusions: Aspects of both stability and change are found. Baseline measures of drinking groups are especially unreliable for younger samples, longer follow-ups and heavier drinkers. There appear to be important subgroups moving between abstention and light drinking and moderate and heavy drinking that can be identified only by multiple measurements or retrospective measures.
Bibliography Citation
Kerr, William C., Kaye Middleton Fillmore and Alan Bostrom. "Stability of Alcohol Consumption over Time: Evidence from Three Longitudinal Surveys from the United States." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 63,3 (May 2002): 325-333.
10. Lanza, Stephanie T.
Collins, Linda M.
A Mixture Model of Discontinuous Development in Heavy Drinking From Ages 18 to 30: The Role of College Enrollment
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 67,4 (July 2006): 552-561.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/A_Mixture_Model_of_Discontinuous_Development_in_Heavy_Drinking_From_Ages_18/878.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; College Enrollment; High School Students

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to illustrate the use of latent class analysis to examine change in behavior over time. Patterns of heavy drinking from ages 18 to 30 were explored in a national sample; the relationship between college enrollment and pathways of heavy drinking, particularly those leading to adult heavy drinking, was explored. Method: Latent class analysis for repeated measures is used to estimate common pathways through a stage-sequential process. Common patterns of development in a categorical variable (presence or absence of heavy drinking) are estimated and college enrollment is a grouping variable. Data were from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 1,265). Results: Eight patterns of heavy drinking were identified: no heavy drinking (53.7%); young adulthood only (3.7%); young adulthood and adulthood (3.7%); college age only (2.6%); college age, young adulthood, and adulthood (8.7%); high school and college age (4.4%); high school, college age, and young adulthood (6.3%); and persistent heavy drinking (16.9%). Conclusions: We found no evidence that prevalence of heavy drinking for those enrolled in college exceeds the prevalence for those not enrolled at any of the four developmental periods studied. In fact, there is some evidence that being enrolled in college appears to be a protective factor for young adult and adult heavy drinking. College-enrolled individuals more often show a pattern characterized by heavy drinking during college ages only, with no heavy drinking prior to and after the college years, whereas nonenrolled individuals not drinking heavily during high school or college ages are at increased risk for adult heavy drinking. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Lanza, Stephanie T. and Linda M. Collins. "A Mixture Model of Discontinuous Development in Heavy Drinking From Ages 18 to 30: The Role of College Enrollment ." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 67,4 (July 2006): 552-561.
11. Miller-Tutzauer, Carol
Leonard, Kenneth E.
Windle, Michael T.
Marriage and Alcohol Use: A Longitudinal Study of "Maturing Out"
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 52,5 (September 1991): 434-440.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Marriage_and_Alcohol_Use_A_Longitudinal_Study_of_Maturing_Out/1737.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Marital Status; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigated whether a change in marital status (specifically, from being single to being married) leads to an alteration of alcohol consumption patterns, using data derived from the NLSY. Four marital transition groups from a total of 10,594 subjects (aged 18-28 years) were constructed based on marital status across a 3-yr period: stably single, married year 3, married year 2, and stably married. In each of the 3 years, information was collected concerning the subjects' alcohol consumption in the 30 days prior to being interviewed. Repeated measures analyses of alcohol-use patterns across time as a function of marital-transition group indicated that the subjects began moderating their alcohol consumption prior to their actual transition to married status, with the trend continuing into the 1st year of marriage. [PsycINFO]
Bibliography Citation
Miller-Tutzauer, Carol, Kenneth E. Leonard and Michael T. Windle. "Marriage and Alcohol Use: A Longitudinal Study of "Maturing Out"." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 52,5 (September 1991): 434-440.
12. Muthen, Bengt O.
Muthen, Linda K.
The Development of Heavy Drinking and Alcohol-Related Problems from Ages 18 to 37 in a U. S. National Sample
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 61,2 (March 2000): 290-300.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Early_Alcohol_Use_Rural_Residence_and_Adult_Employment/2226.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; College Education; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Background; Family History; Gender; High School Dropouts; Racial Differences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Investigated the influence of individual background variables on the development of heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems by examining data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a general population sample (7,859 Ss) that contains information on alcohol use for the ages 18-37 yrs. Background variables included gender, ethnicity, family history of problem drinking, early onset of drinking, high school dropout, and college education. The study used a multivariate outcome approach that focused on individual variation in trajectories over age. The statistical analysis used random coefficients in a latent variable framework. Across-age changes in the importance of the influence of background variables on the outcomes were modeled using varying center points. A key finding is that dropping out of high school has no effect on alcohol-related problems for individuals in their mid-20s, but is associated with significantly increased levels of alcohol-related problems for individuals in their mid-30s. In contrast, going on to college is associated with lower levels of heavy drinking when individuals reach their late twenties and their thirties. Strong gender and ethnicity effects seen in the twenties diminish when individuals reach their thirties. ((c) 2000 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Muthen, Bengt O. and Linda K. Muthen. "The Development of Heavy Drinking and Alcohol-Related Problems from Ages 18 to 37 in a U. S. National Sample." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 61,2 (March 2000): 290-300.
13. O'Neill, Susan Elizabeth
Sher, Kenneth J.
Jackson, Kristina M.
Wood, Phillip K.
Dimensionality of Alcohol Dependence in Young Adulthood: Current versus Lifetime Symptomatology
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 64,4 (July 2003): 495-500.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Dimensionality_of_Alcohol_Dependence_in_Young_Adulthood_Current_versus_Lif/1271.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Modeling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: The factor structure of alcohol dependence was investigated using exploratory factor analysis, specifically contrasting models of alcohol dependence based on lifetime symptom endorsement to models based on current (i.e., past-year) symptom endorsement. Method: Data from the 1989 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were analyzed. DSM-IV alcohol dependence was assessed in this large community sample of current drinkers and lifetime drinkers, representative of both men and women, and ranging in age from 24 to 32. Sixteen items assessing the seven criteria of DSM-IV alcohol dependence were employed. Results: A single-factor model accounted for most of the observed relationships. However, evidence of additional dimensions, characterized by tolerance and impaired control symptoms, was also identified. Conclusions: Our findings do not support the historical tendency of distinguishing physiological (as indicated by tolerance or withdrawal symptoms) from nonphysiological dependence. Most importantly, factor solutions derived from items based on past-year symptom endorsement were consistent with those derived from items based on lifetime symptom endorsement in samples of both current drinkers and lifetime drinkers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
O'Neill, Susan Elizabeth, Kenneth J. Sher, Kristina M. Jackson and Phillip K. Wood. "Dimensionality of Alcohol Dependence in Young Adulthood: Current versus Lifetime Symptomatology." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 64,4 (July 2003): 495-500.
14. Windle, Michael T.
Mate Similarity, Heavy Substance Use and Family History of Problem Drinking Among Young Adult Women
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 58,6 (November 1997): 573-580.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Mate_Similarity_Heavy_Substance_Use_and_Family_History_of_Problem_Drinking/459.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Ethnic Differences; Ethnic Studies; Family History; Hispanics; Marriage; Modeling, Probit; Parental Influences; Racial Differences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVE: This study used data from a national sample of young adult women to evaluate issues about spousal similarity for problem drinking. Paternal and maternal problem drinking were also evaluated in regard to daughters' marriage to a problem drinking spouse, and daughters' problem drinking and substance use. METHOD: Data from over 5,000 young adult women (ages 23-30 yrs) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) archive were used to evaluate associations between marrying a problem-drinking spouse, family history of problem drinking, and women's problem drinking and lifetime marijuana and cocaine use. RESULTS: Findings indicated that black women were less likely to marry a problem-drinking spouse than were Hispanic, Native American or white women. Problem-drinking women were twice as likely to have married a problem-drinking spouse than were non-drinking women, and heavier lifetime marijuana or cocaine use by women was also associated with an almost twofold increase in marrying a problem-drinking spouse. Random effects ordinal probit regression models indicated that, while controlling for major sociodemographic variables (e.g., race, poverty status), maternal, paternal and spousal problem drinking all significantly predicted problem drinking and heavier levels of substance use among the women. CONCLUSIONS: Nonrandom matching of problem drinking among marital partners was indicated in this study and women's problem drinking and substance use practices were predicted by paternal, maternal and spousal problem drinking. The similarity of problem-drinking spouses was not constant across racial/ethnic groups, as black women were less likely to marry a problem- drinking spouse, though racial differences in the age of onset of heavier drinking may have influenced this finding.
Bibliography Citation
Windle, Michael T. "Mate Similarity, Heavy Substance Use and Family History of Problem Drinking Among Young Adult Women." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 58,6 (November 1997): 573-580.
15. Windle, Michael T.
On The Discriminative Validity of a Family History of Problem Drinking Index With a National Sample of Young Adults
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 57,4 (July 1996): 378-386.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/On_the_Discriminative_Validity_of_a_Family_History_of_Problem_Drinking_Inde/335.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Behavioral Problems; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Family History; Psychological Effects; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data on 9,000+ Ss ages 23-30 from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth archives were used to test hypotheses relevant to the discriminative validity of a trichotomous family history of problem drinking index utilizing early onset substance use, adolescent antisocial behavior, & lifetime alcohol & illicit drug use as criterion variables. Support for discriminate validity was indicated: the high density familial risk group differed from moderate & low risk groups showing an earlier onset of marijuana use, higher levels of adolescent antisocial behaviors, & higher levels of lifetime marijuana & cocaine use. High & moderate risk groups differed from the low risk group with regard to alcohol use & alcohol disordered problems; however, except for younger females, the high risk group did not differ significantly from the moderate risk group. Hypotheses regarding lower levels of verbal intelligence & academic attainment & higher school dropout rate among the high risk group were not supported. Results support the usefulness of a multigenerational approach & attest to the greater sensitivity of the trichotomous family history of problem drinking over standard dichotomous measures. 4 Tables, 39 References. Adapted from the source document.(Copyright 1997, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Windle, Michael T. "On The Discriminative Validity of a Family History of Problem Drinking Index With a National Sample of Young Adults." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 57,4 (July 1996): 378-386.