Search Results

Author: Jackson, Kristina M.
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Andreas, Jasmina Burdzovic
Jackson, Kristina M.
Adolescent Alcohol Use Before and After the High School Transition
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 39,6 (June 2015): 1034-1041.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.12730/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Delinquency/Gang Activity; High School

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Results: Alcohol use after HS entry increased at a significantly greater rate than did use during the middle school years, even after accounting for students' age at transition. In addition, early delinquency emerged as a risk factor such that differences in alcohol use existed prior to the transition. That is, children with early delinquency characteristics displayed more rapid progression in alcohol use, but this effect was evident only during middle school.
Bibliography Citation
Andreas, Jasmina Burdzovic and Kristina M. Jackson. "Adolescent Alcohol Use Before and After the High School Transition." Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 39,6 (June 2015): 1034-1041.
2. Jackson, Kristina M.
Schulenberg, John E.
Alcohol Use During the Transition From Middle School to High School: National Panel Data on Prevalence and Moderators
Developmental Psychology 49,11 (November 2013): 2147-2158.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/dev/49/11/2147.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Gender Differences; High School; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Racial Differences

The movement from middle school to high school is a normative transition that is typically associated with increased stress and opportunity in social and academic domains. Theoretically, this transition may reflect a turning point in terms of initiating or sharply increasing heavy alcohol use, a notion that has received little attention in the empirical literature. The present study draws on a nationally representative data set, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), to examine the impact of the high-school transition on increases in alcohol use. The multiwave multicohort design of NLSY97 permits explicit coding of the high-school transition for 3,360 adolescents (48% female; 54% non-Black/non-Hispanic). Using latent transition analysis, we examined transitions among nondrinking, light drinking, and heavy drinking classes to characterize initiation of use and progression to heavier drinking. Non-Black/non-Hispanic youth and those higher on delinquent behaviors were more likely to be involved in alcohol prior to the transition and more likely to rapidly escalate their use with the transition. Although no sex differences were observed prior to the high-school transition, girls were more likely to transition from nondrinking to light drinking, whereas boys were more likely to transition to heavy drinking. High monitoring was associated with greater progression from light drinking in middle school to heavy drinking in high school; low and moderate parental monitoring were associated with initiation of heavy drinking across the transition. The high-school transition is a time of increased risk for many young people, and greater attention to this important school transition as a time to intervene is warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Jackson, Kristina M. and John E. Schulenberg. "Alcohol Use During the Transition From Middle School to High School: National Panel Data on Prevalence and Moderators." Developmental Psychology 49,11 (November 2013): 2147-2158.
3. LoParco, Cassidy
Leeman, Robert
Cheong, JeeWon
Kemble, Chloe
Jackson, Kristina M.
Part-Time Employment as Predictors of Adolescent Alcohol Use in a National Longitudinal Survey
Presented: Atlanta GA, American Public Health Association (APHA) Annual Meeting and Exposition, November 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Employment, In-School; Part-Time Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: While adolescent employment can be beneficial, positive effects have not been found consistently and associations with risky behavior such as alcohol use have been observed. However, most research concerning part-time employment is dated and cross-sectional. Limited findings suggest individual differences in the impact of part-time employment and there is a need to identify mechanisms underlying relationships between part-time employment and alcohol. We hypothesized part-time employment would predict alcohol consumption, due in part to association with deviant peers. We further hypothesized that relationships between part-time employment and alcohol would be stronger among those who perceived their parents as permissive. Methods: Using two waves of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, part-time employment was tested as a predictor of any and heavy alcohol use cross-sectionally and 1-2 years later (N=5664, 51% male, mean age=15.2). We also tested demographic covariates, parental permissiveness as a moderator, and involvement with deviant peers as a mediator. Results: Part-time employment significantly predicted any and heavy alcohol use cross-sectionally. Associating with deviant peers was a significant predictor and partially mediated relationships between part-time employment and alcohol use. Perceived parental permissiveness was related to alcohol use cross-sectionally but not prospectively and did not moderate relationships between part-time employment and alcohol use. Adolescents with jobs at Year 1 and Year 2 and those who took jobs during Year 2 were more likely to engage in any and heavy drinking; whereas those who transitioned out of a job at Year 2 were no longer at significantly greater risk. Conclusions: Part-time employment was associated with elevated risk of drinking, in part due to associations with deviant peers. Perceived parental permissiveness was not related to alcohol use prospectively. Adolescents and parents should weigh benefits and risks of employment. Intervention with adolescent workers should focus on interaction with prosocial peers.
Bibliography Citation
LoParco, Cassidy, Robert Leeman, JeeWon Cheong, Chloe Kemble and Kristina M. Jackson. "Part-Time Employment as Predictors of Adolescent Alcohol Use in a National Longitudinal Survey." Presented: Atlanta GA, American Public Health Association (APHA) Annual Meeting and Exposition, November 2017.
4. O'Neill, Susan Elizabeth
Sher, Kenneth J.
Jackson, Kristina M.
Wood, Phillip K.
Dimensionality of Alcohol Dependence in Young Adulthood: Current versus Lifetime Symptomatology
Journal of Studies on Alcohol 64,4 (July 2003): 495-500.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Dimensionality_of_Alcohol_Dependence_in_Young_Adulthood_Current_versus_Lif/1271.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Modeling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: The factor structure of alcohol dependence was investigated using exploratory factor analysis, specifically contrasting models of alcohol dependence based on lifetime symptom endorsement to models based on current (i.e., past-year) symptom endorsement. Method: Data from the 1989 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were analyzed. DSM-IV alcohol dependence was assessed in this large community sample of current drinkers and lifetime drinkers, representative of both men and women, and ranging in age from 24 to 32. Sixteen items assessing the seven criteria of DSM-IV alcohol dependence were employed. Results: A single-factor model accounted for most of the observed relationships. However, evidence of additional dimensions, characterized by tolerance and impaired control symptoms, was also identified. Conclusions: Our findings do not support the historical tendency of distinguishing physiological (as indicated by tolerance or withdrawal symptoms) from nonphysiological dependence. Most importantly, factor solutions derived from items based on past-year symptom endorsement were consistent with those derived from items based on lifetime symptom endorsement in samples of both current drinkers and lifetime drinkers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
O'Neill, Susan Elizabeth, Kenneth J. Sher, Kristina M. Jackson and Phillip K. Wood. "Dimensionality of Alcohol Dependence in Young Adulthood: Current versus Lifetime Symptomatology." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 64,4 (July 2003): 495-500.