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Source: Health and Place
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Alvarado, Steven Elias
The Indelible Weight of Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage, Timing of Exposure, and Obesity across Adulthood
Health and Place Volume 58 (July 2019): DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2019.102159.
Also: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2019.102159
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Geocoded Data; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Neighborhood Effects; Obesity; Siblings

I use 28 (1986–2014) years of restricted geocoded NLSY tract-level data and find positive associations between exposure to childhood neighborhood disadvantage and adult obesity and BMI among individuals growing up and entering adulthood during the rise of obesity in the United States. Sibling fixed effects and cousin fixed effects models partially address unobserved confounding nested in the nuclear as well as extended family. Furthermore, exposure to neighborhood disadvantage in adolescence is most salient, providing insight into when policy intervention may be most effective. Results are robust to alternative specifications for neighborhood disadvantage, ages of exposure, and to alternative sampling strategies.
Bibliography Citation
Alvarado, Steven Elias. "The Indelible Weight of Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage, Timing of Exposure, and Obesity across Adulthood." Health and Place Volume 58 (July 2019): DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2019.102159.
2. Headen, Irene
Mujahid, Mahasin S.
Deardorff, Julianna
Rehkopf, David
Abrams, Barbara
Associations between Cumulative Neighborhood Deprivation, Long-term Mobility Trajectories, and Gestational Weight Gain
Health and Place 52 (July 2018): 101-109.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1353829217306676
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Mobility; Neighborhood Effects

Existing research on neighborhood environment and gestational weight gain (GWG) focuses on point-in-time measures of neighborhood context. This precludes understanding how long-term exposure to adverse neighborhood environments influences GWG. We estimated associations between average exposure to and trajectories of long-term neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation and risk of inadequate or excessive GWG. Using data from 5690 full-term, singleton pregnancies in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we estimated associations between cumulative deprivation and GWG, overall and by race/ethnicity, controlling for individual and residential covariates. A one standard deviation unit (8-point) increase in neighborhood deprivation increased risk of inadequate GWG (Relative Risk (RR): 1.08; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.00-1.16) for all women and excessive GWG (RR: 1.11; 95% CI 1.02-1.21) for white women. Persistent low deprivation (RR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.64-0.94) and upward mobility (RR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.61-0.96), compared to persistent high deprivation, reduced risk of inadequate GWG. Persistent low deprivation also reduced risk of excessive GWG (RR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.71–0.98). Long-term neighborhood deprivation contributes to patterns of GWG over women's life course.
Bibliography Citation
Headen, Irene, Mahasin S. Mujahid, Julianna Deardorff, David Rehkopf and Barbara Abrams. "Associations between Cumulative Neighborhood Deprivation, Long-term Mobility Trajectories, and Gestational Weight Gain." Health and Place 52 (July 2018): 101-109.
3. Moloney, Katherine L.
South, Scott J.
Ethnic Density and Obesity: Evidence from Fixed-effects Models
Health and Place 31 (January 2015): 199-207.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1353829214001853
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Data Linkage (also see Record Linkage); Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Geocoded Data; Height; Height, Height-Weight Ratios; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Obesity; Racial Differences; Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA); Weight

We use data from the 1980 to 2004 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort to examine the association between the ethnic density of metropolitan areas and obesity among U.S. blacks and Latinos. Although minority groups' obesity rates tend to be higher in metropolitan areas containing many co-ethnics, controlling for other areal characteristics and unobserved time-constant confounders via fixed-effects models dramatically alters this association. In the fixed-effects models, higher levels of co-ethnic density are inversely associated with black males' obesity risk and unrelated to the obesity risk of black females, Latinas, and Latino males. For most groups, marrying and having children increases the risk of obesity.
Bibliography Citation
Moloney, Katherine L. and Scott J. South. "Ethnic Density and Obesity: Evidence from Fixed-effects Models." Health and Place 31 (January 2015): 199-207.
4. Powell, Lisa M.
Zhao, Zhenxiang
Wang, Youfa
Food Prices and Fruit and Vegetable Consumption among Young American Adults
Health and Place 15,4 (December 2009): 1064-1070.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1353829209000513
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Education; Geocoded Data; Mothers, Education; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Socioeconomic Factors

Multivariate negative binomial count models were estimated to examine associations between young adults' fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption and the prices of FV, other food at home grocery items, and fast food and the availability of restaurants and food stores. This study used the 2002 wave of data collected from US young adults aged 18-23 years in the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth merged by geocode identifiers with food prices and restaurant and food store availability. The results showed that higher levels of FV consumption were associated with lower FV prices (price elasticity of -0.32) and that this own-price effect was robust to the inclusion of other food prices and food outlet availability. Lower income and lower educated young adults and those with lower educated mothers and middle-income parents were found to be most price sensitive. No statistically significant cross-price effects on FV consumption were found with other grocery food (meat, dairy and bread) prices or fast food prices. Fiscal policy instruments such as FV subsidies may help to increase FV intake, particularly among young adults of lower socioeconomic status.
Bibliography Citation
Powell, Lisa M., Zhenxiang Zhao and Youfa Wang. "Food Prices and Fruit and Vegetable Consumption among Young American Adults." Health and Place 15,4 (December 2009): 1064-1070.