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Source: Emerald
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Greve, Henrich R.
Sex, Drugs, and Rolling Rocks: Adolescent Counter-Normative Behaviors and Their Job Mobility as Young Adults
In: Adolescent Experiences and Adult Work Outcomes: Connections and Causes: Research in the Sociology of Work, V. 25. L.A. Keister, ed., Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Sexual Activity; Age at First Intercourse; Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Employment; Exits; Mobility, Job

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: This chapter tests whether adolescent counter-normative behaviors increase voluntary and involuntary job exits in young adults. This prediction extends the social sorting view of employment outcomes to cover concealable background characteristics, which has implications for involuntary mobility after entering the job.

Methodology: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) 1997 data are analyzed through survey-weighted Cox models of involuntary and voluntary job change. The key variables are adolescent use of alcohol and illegal drugs, and early sexual debut.

Findings: The findings show that sex and use of drugs in the early teens increase involuntary job exits, controlling for current behaviors, but do not have discernible effects on voluntary job exits. The effects of adolescent behavior appear stronger in multi-establishment firms and for Hispanic and black individuals.

Bibliography Citation
Greve, Henrich R. "Sex, Drugs, and Rolling Rocks: Adolescent Counter-Normative Behaviors and Their Job Mobility as Young Adults" In: Adolescent Experiences and Adult Work Outcomes: Connections and Causes: Research in the Sociology of Work, V. 25. L.A. Keister, ed., Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014
2. Keister, Lisa A.
Religion and Wealth Across Generations
In: Religion, Work and Inequality. L. Keister, et al, eds., Bingley, West Yorkshire, England: Emerald Group Publishing, 2012: 131-150
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Assets; Health and Retirement Study (HRS); Life Course; Religion; Savings; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose – This chapter explores the relationship between religious affiliation and wealth ownership focusing on generational differences.

Methodology – I use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the Health and Retirement Study to create descriptive statistics and regression analyses of the association between religious affiliation in childhood and adulthood for people of two cohorts.

Findings – This chapter shows that there are important patterns by religious affiliation in total net worth, real assets, and asset allocation across generations. My findings are consistent with past work on religion and wealth ownership showing that Jews, mainline Protestants, and white Catholics tend to have higher total wealth than other groups. In addition, I find that black Protestants, Hispanic Catholics, and conservative Protestants tend to have relatively low wealth, consistent with research on religion, race/ethnicity, and wealth. My findings also show that these patterns are relatively robust across generations.

Research implications – The findings are relevant to research on inequality, wealth accumulation and saving, life course processes, and the effect of religion on stratification outcomes.

Originality/Value – This research shows how religious affiliation and wealth are related across generations.

Bibliography Citation
Keister, Lisa A. "Religion and Wealth Across Generations" In: Religion, Work and Inequality. L. Keister, et al, eds., Bingley, West Yorkshire, England: Emerald Group Publishing, 2012: 131-150
3. Kroeger, Sarah
Why Has the College Gender Gap Expanded?
In: Gender in the Labor Market: Research in Labor Economics 42. S.W. Polacheck et al., eds. Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015: 159-203.
Also: http://emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/S0147-912120150000042005
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; College Graduates; Gender Differences; Noncognitive Skills

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses data from the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth to estimate the changing returns to cognitive and non-cognitive skills with respect to college completion, and quantifies the extent to which gender differences in these skills are driving the college gender gap. The use of two distinct college graduation cohorts allows a dynamic analysis of the widening female advantage in college graduation. I decompose the increase in the college gender gap into three pertinent categories of measurable attributes: family background, cognitive skills, and non-cognitive skills (captured by school suspensions, behavioral problems, and legal infractions). A second decomposition is applied to the change in the gap between the two periods. The results show that roughly half of the observed college graduation gender gap in the NLSY97 is due to female advantages in observable characteristics, and roughly half is "unexplained": due to gender differences in the coefficients. With respect to the change in the gap, approximately 29% of the difference in differences is the "explained" component, attributed to changes in the relative characteristics of men and women. In particular, declining non-cognitive skills in men are associated with about 14% of the increase in the gender gap.
Bibliography Citation
Kroeger, Sarah. "Why Has the College Gender Gap Expanded?" In: Gender in the Labor Market: Research in Labor Economics 42. S.W. Polacheck et al., eds. Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015: 159-203.
4. Liu, Yujia
Rehkopf, David
Zhong, Jingwen
Rodriguez, Eunice
Job Loss, Unemployment Benefits, and Mental Health of Middle-Aged US Women
In: Enabling Gender Equality: Future Generations of the Global World, Research in Political Sociology 23. E. Rodriguez and B. Wejnert, eds., United Kingdom: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015: 81-91
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Labor Force Participation; Stress; Unemployment Compensation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Financial stress has been found to contribute to mental health deterioration associated with job loss. This study examined whether specific types of income support programs (e.g., unemployment benefits and welfare) reduce the negative impacts of job loss on middle-aged women's mental health in the United States. Two samples of women previously employed before their mental health assessments in their 40s and 50s were selected from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). We conducted regression analysis to predict their mental health scores using employment and income support program status. The model also controlled for baseline health before job loss, socioeconomic status, and demographic and family life characteristics. Compared to their continuously employed counterparts, 50 +  women who had job loss without unemployment benefits had significantly worse mental health. However, those receiving unemployment benefits did not have significantly worse mental health. Unemployment benefits' ameliorating effect was not found in the 40 +  sample; and welfare programs did not have similar mental health effects. Our findings suggest that certain types of income support policies are beneficial to the mental health of certain cohorts of middle-aged women. For different groups of women, additional and alternative measures are needed to reduce the mental health damage of job loss.
Bibliography Citation
Liu, Yujia, David Rehkopf, Jingwen Zhong and Eunice Rodriguez. "Job Loss, Unemployment Benefits, and Mental Health of Middle-Aged US Women" In: Enabling Gender Equality: Future Generations of the Global World, Research in Political Sociology 23. E. Rodriguez and B. Wejnert, eds., United Kingdom: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015: 81-91
5. McKeever, Matthew
Wolfinger, Nicholas H.
Over the Long Haul: The Persistent Economic Consequences of Single Motherhood
In: Economic Stress and the Family: Contemporary Perspectives in Family Research, Volume 6. S. Blair, ed. Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012: pp. 1-39
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Disadvantaged, Economically; Human Capital; Income; Motherhood; Parents, Single; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: This chapter examines change over time in income, human capital, and socio-demographic attributes for married, divorced, and never-married mothers.

Methodology/approach: The chapter consists of descriptive analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth’s 1979 cohort. Respondents were followed from 1979 to 2006.

Findings: The economic consequences of single motherhood are persistent. Women who have once been divorced or never-married mothers remain poorer through middle age, no matter how their family structure subsequently changes.

Social implications: A critical feature of the modern economic and demographic landscape is the intersection of individual and family characteristics. Many divorced and, especially, never-married mothers experience profound disadvantage even before they become mothers.

Bibliography Citation
McKeever, Matthew and Nicholas H. Wolfinger. "Over the Long Haul: The Persistent Economic Consequences of Single Motherhood" In: Economic Stress and the Family: Contemporary Perspectives in Family Research, Volume 6. S. Blair, ed. Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012: pp. 1-39
6. Pandey, Shanta
Zhan, Min
Kim, Youngmi
Bachelor's Degree for Women with Children: A Promising Pathway to Poverty Reduction
Equal Opportunities International 25,7 (2006): 488-505.
Also: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/0261-0159.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Economic Well-Being; Educational Attainment; Mothers, Education; Poverty; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose – In spite of the War on Poverty programs of the 1960s and the economic boom of the 1990s, poverty remains consistently high among families with children in the USA. The main source of income for these families is employment, which is largely a function of educational attainment. The purpose of this paper is to turn to aggregate and individual level data and demonstrate the power of college education in economic well-being of women with children.

Design/methodology/approach – A nationally representative sample of single and married mothers was retrieved and the role of education in economic well-being of these women was examined using descriptive, bi-variate, and multiple ordinal logistic regression.

Bibliography Citation
Pandey, Shanta, Min Zhan and Youngmi Kim. "Bachelor's Degree for Women with Children: A Promising Pathway to Poverty Reduction ." Equal Opportunities International 25,7 (2006): 488-505.
7. Park, Heejung
Financial Behavior among Young Adult Consumers: The Influence of Self-determination and Financial Psychology
Young Consumers published online (20 May 2021): DOI:10.1108/YC-12-2020-1263.
Also: https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/YC-12-2020-1263/full/html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Debt/Borrowing; Financial Behaviors/Decisions; Motivation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: In the uncertainty of the global economy, many young adults have financial independence from their parents and are making financial decisions in a difficult financial environment. This study aims to focus on debt management behavior for young adult consumers.

Design/methodology/approach: The data is from the 2010 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97). The NLSY97 includes information on US young consumers' financial, demographic and attitudinal characteristics, as well as various socio-economic conditions, making it convenient to explore the relationships between financial behavior and psychology variables. In the 2010 survey, 4,110 young consumers were interviewed.

Findings: The results show that self-determination and motivation alone cannot bring about a direct change in financial behavior without the mediation of financial psychology. Therefore, consumer finance research should consider debt-management behavior by presenting different strategies than those currently used.

Bibliography Citation
Park, Heejung. "Financial Behavior among Young Adult Consumers: The Influence of Self-determination and Financial Psychology." Young Consumers published online (20 May 2021): DOI:10.1108/YC-12-2020-1263.
8. Tong, Di
Tzabbar, Daniel
Park, Haemin Dennis
How Does Relative Income Affect Entry into Pure and Hybrid Entrepreneurship?
In: Employee Inter- and Intra-Firm Mobility (Advances in Strategic Management, Vol. 41). D. Tzabbar and B. Cirillo, eds., U.K: Emerald Publishing Limited, 2020: pp. 365-383.
Also: https://doi.org/10.1108/S0742-332220200000041024
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Entrepreneurship; Income

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We explore how absolute and relative incomes affect an individual's propensity to start a new business as a pure or hybrid entrepreneur. Using a sample of 12,686 individuals from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort (NLSY79) in our empirical analyses, we find that individuals with high absolute income are generally less likely to engage in entrepreneurship. However, once absolute income is controlled, those with above-average relative income are more likely to become an entrepreneur, particularly in pure form as opposed to a hybrid one. Our findings provide more nuanced understanding on the differences between absolute and relative income levels influencing an individual's decision to become an entrepreneur, and if so, whether to engage in pure or hybrid form.
Bibliography Citation
Tong, Di, Daniel Tzabbar and Haemin Dennis Park. "How Does Relative Income Affect Entry into Pure and Hybrid Entrepreneurship?" In: Employee Inter- and Intra-Firm Mobility (Advances in Strategic Management, Vol. 41). D. Tzabbar and B. Cirillo, eds., U.K: Emerald Publishing Limited, 2020: pp. 365-383.
9. Warner, Cody
Criminal Justice Contact and Coresidence in Young Adulthood: Exploring the Role of the Family Context
In: Contemporary Perspectives in Family Research: The Justice System and the Family: Police, Courts, and Incarceration, 20. S.R. Maxwell and S.L. Blair, eds., United Kingdom: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2022: 167-194.
Also: https://doi.org/10.1108/S1530-353520220000020008
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Criminal Justice System; Family Characteristics; Residence, Return to Parental Home/Delayed Homeleaving

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

For contemporary American young adults (aged 18-29), coresidence with parents is now the most common living arrangement. Recent research on residential transitions out of and back into the parental home shows that residential independence is still common, meaning that many young adults coreside with parents after first leaving the nest. The timing of residential independence and subsequent coresidence is often tied to other life-course outcomes, such as relationships and employment, as well as characteristics of the family context, such as family structure and financial resources. A small body of research also demonstrates that residential transitions are common following criminal justice contact experiences such as arrests and periods of incarceration. While this association does not appear to be explained by the family context, the current study argues there are several reasons to anticipate heterogeneity in coresidence patterns based on the childhood family context. Drawing on data from the 1997 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I find that criminal justice contact is associated with coresidence with parents during young adulthood in a fairly consistent manner across different dimensions of family context (although parental education may play a role). These findings demonstrate the power of the criminal justice system in directing or redirecting residential trajectories and have implications for both individuals with contact and their families.
Bibliography Citation
Warner, Cody. "Criminal Justice Contact and Coresidence in Young Adulthood: Exploring the Role of the Family Context" In: Contemporary Perspectives in Family Research: The Justice System and the Family: Police, Courts, and Incarceration, 20. S.R. Maxwell and S.L. Blair, eds., United Kingdom: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2022: 167-194.