Search Results

Author: Zhan, Min
Resulting in 17 citations.
1. Pandey, Shanta
Zhan, Min
Kim, Youngmi
Bachelor's Degree for Women with Children: A Promising Pathway to Poverty Reduction
Equal Opportunities International 25,7 (2006): 488-505.
Also: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/0261-0159.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Economic Well-Being; Educational Attainment; Mothers, Education; Poverty; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose – In spite of the War on Poverty programs of the 1960s and the economic boom of the 1990s, poverty remains consistently high among families with children in the USA. The main source of income for these families is employment, which is largely a function of educational attainment. The purpose of this paper is to turn to aggregate and individual level data and demonstrate the power of college education in economic well-being of women with children.

Design/methodology/approach – A nationally representative sample of single and married mothers was retrieved and the role of education in economic well-being of these women was examined using descriptive, bi-variate, and multiple ordinal logistic regression.

Bibliography Citation
Pandey, Shanta, Min Zhan and Youngmi Kim. "Bachelor's Degree for Women with Children: A Promising Pathway to Poverty Reduction ." Equal Opportunities International 25,7 (2006): 488-505.
2. Zhan, Min
Assets, Human Capital Development, and Economic Mobility of Single Mothers
Families in Society 88,4 (October-December 2007): 605-615.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=3683
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Assets; Educational Status; Home Ownership; Mobility, Economic; Mothers; Parents, Single; Training, On-the-Job; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the relationships of single mothers' assets (home ownership, bank account ownership, automobile ownership, and net worth) and human capital development (educational advancement, work hours, and job-related training) to their economic mobility. Analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) indicates factors that could help improve the upward economic mobility of single mothers include their assets, educational status and advancement, and work experience. Mothers' assets were also positively related to their educational advancement, job training participation, and work hours. Furthermore, it appears that the relationship between mother's assets (automobile ownership and net worth) with economic mobility was partially mediated by work experience. These results support investment strategies to enhance the long-term economic well-being of single mothers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Families in Society is the property of Alliance for Children & Families and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min. "Assets, Human Capital Development, and Economic Mobility of Single Mothers." Families in Society 88,4 (October-December 2007): 605-615.
3. Zhan, Min
Assets, Parental Expectations and Involvement, and Children's Educational Performance
Children and Youth Services Review 28,8 (August 2006): 961-975.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740905002124
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Assets; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Elementary School Students; Parent-School involvement; Parental Influences; Parental Investments; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

This study examines the relationships between parental assets with their expectations and involvement of children's education, and children's educational performance measured 2 years later. Through the analysis of the mother–child data set of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), results indicate that after controlling for family income and other parent characteristics, parental assets were positively related to children's math and reading scores. Parental assets were also positively associated with their expectations and involvement of school activities. Furthermore, parent expectations partially mediated the relationship between assets and children's educational performance. These findings imply that in order to improve children's education, how to enhance parental assets warrants the consideration of public policy. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR; Copyright 2006 Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min. "Assets, Parental Expectations and Involvement, and Children's Educational Performance." Children and Youth Services Review 28,8 (August 2006): 961-975.
4. Zhan, Min
Debt and College Graduation: Differences by Race/Ethnicity
Working Paper No. 13-08, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Assets; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Ethnic Differences; Family Resources; Racial Differences; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the relationship between youth debt (from education loans and credit cards) and college graduation, considering the ways in which the relationship differs by race/ethnicity. Results show little evidence that student loans and credit card debt reduce the gaps between White and minority students in the likelihood of college graduation. Findings also indicate that the likelihood of graduating from college is higher among White and Black students with education loans of $10,000 or more than among those without education loans. However, among minority students (Black and Hispanic students), those with education loans of $10,000 or more are less likely to graduate than those with loans between $5,000 and $10,000. I discuss the policy implications of the findings.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min. "Debt and College Graduation: Differences by Race/Ethnicity." Working Paper No. 13-08, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, 2013.
5. Zhan, Min
Economic Mobility of Single Mothers: The Role of Assets and Human Capital Development
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 33,4 (December 2006): 127-150.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/33-4.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Human Capital; Mobility, Economic; Mobility, Labor Market; Parents, Single; Poverty; Training, Employee; Training, Occupational; Training, On-the-Job; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the economic mobility of single mothers. It highlights the relationships between single mothers' financial assets and human capital development (educational advancement, job training, and work hours) with their economic mobility. Analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) indicates that assets may help improve upward economic mobility. Assets, however, have differential impact on single mothers with different income levels. In addition, human capital development mediates the positive link between assets and the economic mobility for mothers living between the 100% and 200% federal poverty. These results support asset building as an investment strategy to enhance the long-term economic wellbeing of single mothers. The findings also underscore the importance of examining within-group variations among single mothers in designing effective asset-building policies and programs. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare is the property of Western Michigan University and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min. "Economic Mobility of Single Mothers: The Role of Assets and Human Capital Development." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 33,4 (December 2006): 127-150.
6. Zhan, Min
The Impact of Youth Debt on College Graduation
CSD Working Paper No. 12-11, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, 2012.
Also: http://csd.wustl.edu/Publications/Documents/WP12-11.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Assets; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Ethnic Differences; Family Resources; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the associations between educational loans and credit card debt with the possibility of college graduation among a group of youth who enrolled in college. It further investigates whether the associations differ by levels of parental assets. Results indicate that, after parental assets and other variables are considered, educational loans are positively related to college graduation; however, there is evidence that educational loans above $10,000 reduce the probability of college graduation. Parental assets are positively linked to youth’s college graduation, and the relationship between educational loans and college graduation is stronger among youth whose families have lower levels of financial assets. Credit card debt is positively related to college graduation only among families with modest financial assets. Policy implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min. "The Impact of Youth Debt on College Graduation." CSD Working Paper No. 12-11, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, 2012.
7. Zhan, Min
The Impact of Youth Debt on College Graduation
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 41,3 (September 2014): 133-156
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Assets; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Ethnic Differences; Family Resources; Racial Differences; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the associations between educational loans and credit card debt with the possibility of college graduation among a group of youth who enrolled in college. It further investigates whether the associations differ by levels of parental assets. Results indicate that, after parental assets and other variables are considered, educational loans are positively related to college graduation; however, there is evidence that educational loans above $10,000 reduce the probability of college graduation. Parental assets are positively linked to youth's college graduation, and the relationship between educational loans and college graduation is stronger among youth whose families have lower levels of financial assets. Credit card debt is positively related to college graduation only among families with modest financial assets. Policy implications are considered.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min. "The Impact of Youth Debt on College Graduation." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 41,3 (September 2014): 133-156.
8. Zhan, Min
Lanesskog, Deirdre
The Impact of Family Assets and Debt on College Graduation
Children and Youth Services Review 43 (August 2014): 67-74.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740914001613
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Assets; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Ethnic Differences; Family Resources; Racial Differences

This study examines the influence of family financial assets and debt, both measured during the time of youth’s college enrollment, on the chances of college graduation. Data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Results from analyses controlling for a number of student, parental, and institutional characteristics indicate that family assets are positively related to the chances of college graduation among White and Black students; family debt is negatively associated with the odds of college graduation among Black students, but neither family assets nor family debt is related to the chances of college graduation among Hispanic students. Overall, results indicate that family assets and debt explain a small portion of racial/ethnic gaps in college graduation. Policy implications are considered.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min and Deirdre Lanesskog. "The Impact of Family Assets and Debt on College Graduation." Children and Youth Services Review 43 (August 2014): 67-74.
9. Zhan, Min
Sherraden, Michael
Assets and Liabilities, Educational Expectations, and Children's College Degree Attainment
CSD Working Papers No. 09-60, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, 2009.
Also: http://csd.wustl.edu/Publications/Documents/RB09-63.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Assets; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research examines relationships among household assets and liabilities, educational expectations of children and parents, and children's college degree attainment. Special attention is paid to influences of different asset types (financial vs. nonfinancial assets) and liabilities (secured vs. unsecured debt). Results indicate that, after controlling for family income and other parent/child characteristics, financial and nonfinancial assets are positively related to, and unsecured debt is negatively related to, children's college completion. Furthermore, there is evidence that financial assets are positively associated with the education expectations of parents and children. Policy directions are suggested.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min and Michael Sherraden. "Assets and Liabilities, Educational Expectations, and Children's College Degree Attainment." CSD Working Papers No. 09-60, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, 2009.
10. Zhan, Min
Sherraden, Michael
Assets and Liabilities, Educational Expectations, and Children's College Degree Attainment
Research Brief Report No. 09-63, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, November 2009.
Also: http://csd.wustl.edu/Publications/Documents/RB09-63.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Assets; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data are drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) main file and the child/young adult data sets. The study sample (n=750) includes children who were 11 to 14 years old in 1994. Data related to parental assets, expectations, and other parent characteristics are taken from the survey year 1994, and children's college graduation is measured in 2006, when these children were 23 to 26 years old. In this way, a temporal order is established between assets/liabilities, expectations, and children's later college graduation.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min and Michael Sherraden. "Assets and Liabilities, Educational Expectations, and Children's College Degree Attainment." Research Brief Report No. 09-63, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, November 2009.
11. Zhan, Min
Sherraden, Michael
Assets and Liabilities, Educational Expectations, and Children's College Degree Attainment
Children and Youth Services Review 33,6 (June 2011): 846-854.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S019074091000407X
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Assets; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Family Resources; High School Completion/Graduates

This research examines relationships among household assets and liabilities, educational expectations of children and parents, and children's college degree attainment. Special attention is paid to influences of different asset types (financial vs. nonfinancial assets) and liabilities (secured vs. unsecured debt). Results indicate that, after controlling for family income and other parent/child characteristics, financial and nonfinancial assets are positively related to, and unsecured debt is negatively related to, children's college completion. Furthermore, there is evidence that financial assets are positively associated with the education expectations of parents and children. Policy directions are suggested.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min and Michael Sherraden. "Assets and Liabilities, Educational Expectations, and Children's College Degree Attainment." Children and Youth Services Review 33,6 (June 2011): 846-854.
12. Zhan, Min
Sherraden, Michael
Assets and Liabilities, Race/Ethnicity, and Children's College Education
Research Brief Report No. 10-09, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, February 2010.
Also: http://csd.wustl.edu/Publications/Documents/RB10-09.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Assets; Black Family; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Hispanics

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using longitudinal data, this study looks at White, Black, and Hispanic families to examine relationships between household resources (especially assets and liabilities) and children's later college education—both attendance and graduation.This study extends research conducted by Zhan and Sherraden (2009) with in-depth analysis of college attendance and completion within racial/ethnic groups.

Research Questions
We ask two research questions. First, are household assets (financial and nonfinancial assets) and liabilities (secured and unsecured debt) associated with disparities in college attendance and college graduation among White, Black, and Hispanic children? Second, do assets and liabilities have differential links to college education for children from White, Black, and Hispanic families?

Research Methods
Data are drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) main file and the NLSY79 child/young adult data sets. The study sample (N=1,162) includes children who were 11 to 17 years old in 1994. Data related to household assets, liabilities, and other parent and child characteristics are from mother/child data of survey year 1994, and information on children's college attendance and college graduation is from young adult data of survey year 2006, when these children were 23 to 29 years old. In this way, temporal order between assets and liabilities and later college education is established.

Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min and Michael Sherraden. "Assets and Liabilities, Race/Ethnicity, and Children's College Education." Research Brief Report No. 10-09, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, February 2010.
13. Zhan, Min
Sherraden, Michael
Assets and Liabilities, Race/Ethnicity, and Children's College Education
Working Paper No. 10-08, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, 2010
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Assets; Black Family; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Hispanics

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the extent to which household assets and liabilities are related to disparities in children's college attendance and college graduation among White, Black, and Hispanic families. Results indicate that, after household assets are considered, a substantial portion of the Black-White gap in college attendance and college graduation disappears, and a small portion of the Hispanic-White gap in college graduation also disappears. Separate analyses of children from each racial/ethnic group further indicate that family income and financial assets are related to White children's college attendance and graduation, but nonfinancial assets and unsecured debt are associated with college attendance and graduation among Black and Hispanic children. Policy implications are considered.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min and Michael Sherraden. "Assets and Liabilities, Race/Ethnicity, and Children's College Education." Working Paper No. 10-08, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, 2010.
14. Zhan, Min
Sherraden, Michael
Assets and Liabilities, Race/Ethnicity, and Children's College Education
Children and Youth Services Review 33,11 (November 2011): 2168-2175.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740911002386
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Assets; Black Family; Black Youth; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Resources; Hispanic Youth

This study examines the extent to which household assets and liabilities are related to disparities in children's college attendance and college graduation among White, Black, and Hispanic families. Results indicate that, after household assets are considered, a substantial portion of the Black–White gap in college attendance and college graduation disappears, and a small portion of the Hispanic–White gap in college graduation also disappears. Separate analyses of children from each racial/ethnic group further indicate that family income and financial assets are related to White children's college attendance and graduation, but nonfinancial assets and unsecured debt are associated with college attendance and graduation among Black and Hispanic children. Policy implications are considered.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min and Michael Sherraden. "Assets and Liabilities, Race/Ethnicity, and Children's College Education." Children and Youth Services Review 33,11 (November 2011): 2168-2175.
15. Zhan, Min
Xiang, Xiaoling
Education Loans and Asset Building among Black and Hispanic Young Adults
Children and Youth Services Review 91 (August 2018): 121-127.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740918301300
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Assets; Hispanics; Racial Differences; Student Loans; Wealth

Use of education loans as a way to finance college education has grown rapidly, with minority students and their families being particularly burdened with education loan debt. Given the rising education loans and the racial/ethnic disparity in wealth accumulation, it is timely and important to examine how education loans affect the ability of future wealth building among minority households. This study examines the association between education loans and financial asset building among Black and Hispanic young adults aged 30 years by analyzing data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The results from a treatment–effects model indicate that having education loans is negatively related to net worth and nonfinancial assets at age 30, after controlling for respondents' demographic characteristics, years of education, and working hours. The relationship between the amount of education loans and indicators of financial balance sheets, however, is not statistically significant among the Black and Hispanic young adults with outstanding loans.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min and Xiaoling Xiang. "Education Loans and Asset Building among Black and Hispanic Young Adults." Children and Youth Services Review 91 (August 2018): 121-127.
16. Zhan, Min
Xiang, Xiaoling
Elliott, William III
Education Loans and Wealth Building among Young Adults
Children and Youth Services Review 66 (July 2016): 67-75.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740916301360
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Assets; College Cost; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Costs; Financial Assistance; Housing/Housing Characteristics/Types; Racial Differences; Student Loans; Wealth

With the use of education loans growing rapidly as a way to finance college education, it is important to examine how such loans impact the future financial well-being. This study examines the association between education loans and postcollege wealth accumulation among young adults, the group with the greatest share of outstanding education loans. Data come from 15 rounds of data of the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and the analyses control for a number of student characteristics, college experiences, and parental income. Results from a treatment-effects model indicate that having education loans upon leaving college is negatively related to postcollege net worth, financial assets, nonfinancial assets, and value of primary housing. Furthermore, having education loans also has an additional negative link to the value of net worth among Black young adults. The relationship between the amount of education loans and wealth accumulation is not statistically significant among those with outstanding loans. The study findings indicate the importance of developing alternative approaches, instead of additional loans and other credits, to meet the financial needs of college students.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min, Xiaoling Xiang and William III Elliott. "Education Loans and Wealth Building among Young Adults." Children and Youth Services Review 66 (July 2016): 67-75.
17. Zhan, Min
Xiang, Xiaoling
Elliott, William III
How Much Is Too Much: Educational Loans and College Graduation
Educational Policy 32,7 (November 2018): 993-1017.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0895904816682316
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): College Cost; College Graduates; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Costs; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the association between educational loans and college graduation rates, with a focus on differences by race and ethnicity. Data come from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Results from the event history analyses indicate that educational loans are positively related to college graduation rates, but only up to a point (about US$19,753). Although this nonlinear relationship holds true among White, Black, and Hispanic students, there are differences in the level of loans where its effect turns negative on graduate rates. There is little evidence overall that educational loans reduce racial and ethnic disparities in college graduation.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min, Xiaoling Xiang and William III Elliott. "How Much Is Too Much: Educational Loans and College Graduation." Educational Policy 32,7 (November 2018): 993-1017.