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Author: Witbrodt, Jane
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J.
Witbrodt, Jane
Mulia, Nina
Differential Consequences: Racial/Ethnic and Gender Differences in the Enduring Impact of Early Disadvantage on Heavy Drinking in Midlife
Prevention Science published online (10 July 2019): DOI: 10.1007/s11121-019-01033-1.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11121-019-01033-1
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Poverty; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use a "chain of risks" model to identify risk factors for prolonged heavy drinking in a nationally representative US sample followed from adolescence to middle age, focusing on educational mediators and differential consequences of early exposure to family poverty and area-level disadvantage. Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (civilian respondents ages 14-19 at baseline, N = 5781), longitudinal path models assessed racial/ethnic and gender differences in indirect effects of early disadvantage (duration of exposure to family poverty and area-level disadvantage during adolescence) on midlife heavy drinking. Educational mediators were high school academic performance (taking remedial coursework), high school completion, and attaining a college education. Subgroups were based on race/ethnicity (50.7% White, 30.5% Black, 18.8% Hispanic respondents) and gender (49.6% males). There was a significant indirect path from family poverty during adolescence to poor high school academic performance, lower educational attainment, and more heavy drinking in midlife. For Black respondents, there was an additional direct effect of early area-level disadvantage on greater midlife heavy drinking that was not seen for other groups. The effect of family poverty on reduced high school graduation was stronger for males than females. Enduring impacts of family poverty duration during adolescence on educational attainment have consequences for health risk behaviors in midlife. Due to differential exposure to early adversity, intersectoral interventions are needed to reduce disparities in alcohol outcomes and to promote health equity among high-risk populations.
Bibliography Citation
Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J., Jane Witbrodt and Nina Mulia. "Differential Consequences: Racial/Ethnic and Gender Differences in the Enduring Impact of Early Disadvantage on Heavy Drinking in Midlife." Prevention Science published online (10 July 2019): DOI: 10.1007/s11121-019-01033-1.
2. Mulia, Nina
Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J.
Witbrodt, Jane
Bond, Jason
Williams, Edwina
Zemore, Sarah E.
Racial/Ethnic Differences in 30-year Trajectories of Heavy Drinking in a Nationally Representative U.S. Sample
Drug and Alcohol Dependence 170 (1 January 2017): 133-141.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871616309826
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Ethnic Differences; Life Course; Racial Differences

Background: Racial/ethnic minorities bear a disproportionate burden of alcohol-related problems in the U.S. It is unknown whether this reflects harmful patterns of lifecourse heavy drinking. Prior research shows little support for the latter but has been limited to young samples. We examine racial/ethnic differences in heavy drinking trajectories from ages 21 to 51.

Methods: Data on heavy drinking (6+ drinks/occasion) are from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 9,468), collected between 1982 and 2012. Sex-stratified, generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to model heavy drinking frequency trajectories as a function of age with a cubic curve, and interactions of race with age terms were tested to assess racial/ethnic differences. Models adjusted for time-varying socioeconomic status and marital and parenting status; predictors of trajectories were examined in race- and sex-specific models.

Results: White men and women had similarly steep declines in heavy drinking frequency throughout the 20s, contrasting with slower declines (and lower peaks) in Black and Hispanic men and women. During the 30s there was a Hispanic-White crossover in men's heavy drinking curves, and a Black-White female crossover among lifetime heavy drinkers; by age 51, racial/ethnic group trajectories converged in both sexes. Greater education was protective for all groups.

Bibliography Citation
Mulia, Nina, Katherine J. Karriker-Jaffe, Jane Witbrodt, Jason Bond, Edwina Williams and Sarah E. Zemore. "Racial/Ethnic Differences in 30-year Trajectories of Heavy Drinking in a Nationally Representative U.S. Sample." Drug and Alcohol Dependence 170 (1 January 2017): 133-141.