Search Results

Author: Williams, Edwina
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Kerr, William C.
Lui, Camillia K.
Williams, Edwina
Ye, Yu
Greenfield, Thomas K.
Lown, E. Anne
Health Risk Factors Associated with Lifetime Abstinence from Alcohol in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 41,2 (February 2017): 388-398.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.13302/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort of 14 to 21 year olds followed through 2012 (n = 7,515). Definitions of abstinence and occasional drinking were constructed based on multiple measurements. Descriptive analyses were used to compare the definitions, and in further analysis, lifetime abstainers (n = 718) and lifetime minimal drinkers (n = 1,027) were compared with drinkers across demographics and early-life characteristics (i.e., religion, poverty, parental education, and family alcohol problems) in logistic regression models.
Bibliography Citation
Kerr, William C., Camillia K. Lui, Edwina Williams, Yu Ye, Thomas K. Greenfield and E. Anne Lown. "Health Risk Factors Associated with Lifetime Abstinence from Alcohol in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort." Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 41,2 (February 2017): 388-398.
2. Kerr, William C.
Williams, Edwina
Li, Libo
Lui, Camillia K.
Ye, Yu
Greenfield, Thomas K.
Lown, E. Anne
Alcohol Use Patterns and Risk of Diabetes Onset in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort
Preventive Medicine 109 (April 2018): 22-27.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743518300100
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); Health, Chronic Conditions; Life Course

One of the major limitations in studying alcohol's effect on risk for diabetes is the issue of classifying drinking patterns across the life course prior to the onset of diabetes. Furthermore, this research often overlooks important life course risk factors such as obesity and early-life health problems that may complicate estimation of the relationship between alcohol and diabetes. This study used data from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort of 14-21 year olds followed through 2012 (n = 8289). Alcohol use was captured through time-varying measures of past month volume and frequency of days with 6+ drinks. Discrete-time survival models controlling for demographics, early-life characteristics and time-varying risk factors of employment, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) group, stratified by sex and race/ethnicity, were estimated. Increased odds of diabetes onset was found among lifetime abstainers for women compared to the low volume reference group (odds ratio (OR) 1.57; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.07–2.3). Increased odds of diabetes onset was also found among women who reported drinking 6+ drinks in a day on a weekly basis during the prior 10 years (OR 1.55; CI 1.04–2.31). Models interacting alcohol and BMI groups found increased odds of diabetes onset from lifetime abstention among overweight women only (OR 3.06; CI 1.67–5.60). This study confirms previous findings of protective effects from low volume drinking compared to lifetime abstention and harmful effects from regular heavy occasion drinking for women. Further, protective effects in this US sample were found to be limited to overweight women only.
Bibliography Citation
Kerr, William C., Edwina Williams, Libo Li, Camillia K. Lui, Yu Ye, Thomas K. Greenfield and E. Anne Lown. "Alcohol Use Patterns and Risk of Diabetes Onset in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort." Preventive Medicine 109 (April 2018): 22-27.
3. Lown, E. Anne
Lui, Camillia K.
Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J.
Mulia, Nina
Williams, Edwina
Ye, Yu
Li, Libo
Greenfield, Thomas K.
Kerr, William C.
Adverse Childhood Events and Risk of Diabetes Onset in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort
BMC Public Health 19 (December 2019): DOI: 10.1186/s12889-019-7337-5.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12889-019-7337-5
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Health, Chronic Conditions; Obesity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: Type 2 diabetes is a major public health problem with considerable personal and societal costs. Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) are associated with a number of serious and chronic health problems in adulthood, but these experiences have not been adequately studied in relation to diabetes in a US national sample. The association between ACE and poor health can be partially explained by greater risky health behaviors (RHB) such as smoking, heavy alcohol use, or obesity. Few studies have examined ACE in relation to adult onset Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) taking into account the role of RHB. Using longitudinal data from a representative US population sample followed over 30 years, this study examines the impact of ACE on the risk of diabetes onset.

Methods: Data from the 1982 to 2012 waves of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were analyzed, spanning ages 14 to 56. Bivariate and discrete-time survival models were used to assess the relationships between ACE and RHB including smoking, alcohol use, and obesity, and subsequent onset of diabetes.

Conclusion: ACE predicted diabetes onset among women, though this relationship was attenuated when controlling for BMI. Being overweight or obese was significantly more common among women with a history of ACE, which suggests BMI may be on the pathway from ACE to diabetes onset for women.

Bibliography Citation
Lown, E. Anne, Camillia K. Lui, Katherine J. Karriker-Jaffe, Nina Mulia, Edwina Williams, Yu Ye, Libo Li, Thomas K. Greenfield and William C. Kerr. "Adverse Childhood Events and Risk of Diabetes Onset in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort." BMC Public Health 19 (December 2019): DOI: 10.1186/s12889-019-7337-5.
4. Mulia, Nina
Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J.
Witbrodt, Jane
Bond, Jason
Williams, Edwina
Zemore, Sarah E.
Racial/Ethnic Differences in 30-year Trajectories of Heavy Drinking in a Nationally Representative U.S. Sample
Drug and Alcohol Dependence 170 (1 January 2017): 133-141.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871616309826
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Ethnic Differences; Life Course; Racial Differences

Background: Racial/ethnic minorities bear a disproportionate burden of alcohol-related problems in the U.S. It is unknown whether this reflects harmful patterns of lifecourse heavy drinking. Prior research shows little support for the latter but has been limited to young samples. We examine racial/ethnic differences in heavy drinking trajectories from ages 21 to 51.

Methods: Data on heavy drinking (6+ drinks/occasion) are from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 9,468), collected between 1982 and 2012. Sex-stratified, generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to model heavy drinking frequency trajectories as a function of age with a cubic curve, and interactions of race with age terms were tested to assess racial/ethnic differences. Models adjusted for time-varying socioeconomic status and marital and parenting status; predictors of trajectories were examined in race- and sex-specific models.

Results: White men and women had similarly steep declines in heavy drinking frequency throughout the 20s, contrasting with slower declines (and lower peaks) in Black and Hispanic men and women. During the 30s there was a Hispanic-White crossover in men's heavy drinking curves, and a Black-White female crossover among lifetime heavy drinkers; by age 51, racial/ethnic group trajectories converged in both sexes. Greater education was protective for all groups.

Bibliography Citation
Mulia, Nina, Katherine J. Karriker-Jaffe, Jane Witbrodt, Jason Bond, Edwina Williams and Sarah E. Zemore. "Racial/Ethnic Differences in 30-year Trajectories of Heavy Drinking in a Nationally Representative U.S. Sample." Drug and Alcohol Dependence 170 (1 January 2017): 133-141.
5. Williams, Edwina
Mulia, Nina
Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J.
Lui, Camillia K.
Changing Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Heavy Drinking Trajectories through Young Adulthood: A Comparative Cohort Study
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 42,1 (January 2018): 135-143.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.13541/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Ethnic Differences; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Methods: Data are from the 1979 (n=10,963) and 1997 (n=8,852) cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Generalized estimating equations were used to model trajectories of heavy drinking frequency from ages 17-31. Racial/ethnic differences were determined using sex-stratified models and three-way interactions of race/ethnicity with age, age-squared and cohort.

Results: Racial/ethnic differences in heavy drinking trajectories have changed over time in men and women. In the older NLSY cohort, Hispanic men and Black women surpassed White men's and women's heavy drinking frequency by age 31. This crossover was absent in the younger cohort, where trajectories of all racial-sex groups converged by age 31. Normative trajectories have changed in Hispanics and Whites of both sexes, with a delay in age of peak frequency, and greater levels of heavy drinking in the younger cohort of women.

Conclusion: Changes in heavy drinking trajectories over time suggest the need for targeted interventions during young adulthood. While disparities in young adult heavy drinking were no longer apparent in the more recent birth cohort, continued monitoring is important.

Bibliography Citation
Williams, Edwina, Nina Mulia, Katherine J. Karriker-Jaffe and Camillia K. Lui. "Changing Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Heavy Drinking Trajectories through Young Adulthood: A Comparative Cohort Study." Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 42,1 (January 2018): 135-143.
6. Zemore, Sarah E.
Mulia, Nina
Williams, Edwina
Gilbert, Paul A.
Job Loss and Alcohol Dependence among Blacks and Whites in a National Longitudinal Survey
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse 16,3 (2017): 314-327.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15332640.2016.1209144
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Job Tenure; Racial Differences; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We used the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to test whether the association between job loss and incidence of alcohol dependence differed across Blacks and Whites. Respondents were interviewed annually from 1979 to 1994; DSM-IV dependence was assessed in 1989 and 1994. Analyses included only those employed in 1989 and involved lagged logistic regressions predicting past-year dependence in 1994 from job loss during 1990-1993. Unexpectedly, results showed stronger and more robust associations between job loss and dependence among Whites (AOR = 1.93, p < .05) than among Blacks (AOR = 0.82, nonsignificant). Findings diverge from prior research, suggesting disparities may differ as a function of age and/or time.
Bibliography Citation
Zemore, Sarah E., Nina Mulia, Edwina Williams and Paul A. Gilbert. "Job Loss and Alcohol Dependence among Blacks and Whites in a National Longitudinal Survey." Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse 16,3 (2017): 314-327.