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Author: Zheng, Hui
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Dirlam, Jonathan
Zheng, Hui
Job Satisfaction Developmental Trajectories and Health: A Life Course Perspective
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Life Course

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort (NLSY79) to examine how heterogeneity in job satisfaction developmental trajectories of individuals starting at age 25 and ending at age 39 influence health outcomes after the age of 40. The application of job satisfaction developmental trajectories affords us several advantages over past research. First, the incorporation of life course models allows us to observe if prolonged job satisfaction has a greater beneficial effect on health outcomes compared to intermittingly experienced levels of job satisfaction. If the effect of prolonged job satisfaction is greater, we can analyze whether this effect is strong enough to influence physical health more than the non-existent to modest relationship found in past studies (Faragher, Cass, and Cooper, 2005; Heslop, et al, 2002). The effects of job satisfaction developmental trajectories are assessed on several mental and physical health outcomes. Second, the estimation of the job satisfaction trajectories themselves affords us the ability to see what factors can influence membership and which groups are more likely to belong to a particular trajectory. Finally, trajectory analysis also allows us to include both the working and non-working population in our health models in contrast to prior studies that mainly include only the working population (Nakata, Irie, and Takahashi, 2013; Amati et al, 2010; Fischer and Sousa-Poza, 2009; Heslop, et al, 2002).
Bibliography Citation
Dirlam, Jonathan and Hui Zheng. "Job Satisfaction Developmental Trajectories and Health: A Life Course Perspective." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
2. Dirlam, Jonathan
Zheng, Hui
Job Satisfaction Developmental Trajectories and Health: A Life Course Perspective
Social Science and Medicine 178 (April 2017): 95-103.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953617300473
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Life Course; Sleep

Understanding the health consequence of job dissatisfaction becomes increasingly important because job insecurity, stress and dissatisfaction have significantly increased in the United States in the last decade. Despite the extensive work in this area, prior studies nonetheless may underestimate the harmful effect of job dissatisfaction due to the cross-sectional nature of their data and sample selection bias. This study applies a life-course approach to more comprehensively examine the relationship between job satisfaction and health. Using data from the NLSY 1979 cohort, we estimate group based job satisfaction trajectories of respondents starting at age 25 and ending at age 39. Four job satisfaction trajectory groups are identified, a consistently high satisfaction group, a downward group, an upward group, and a lowest satisfaction group. We examine the effects of these trajectories on several physical and mental health outcomes of respondents in their early forties. We find membership in the lowest job satisfaction trajectory group to be negatively associated with all five mental health outcomes, supporting the accumulation of risks life course model. Those in the upward job satisfaction trajectory group have similar health outcomes to those in the high job satisfaction trajectory group, supporting the social mobility life course model. Overall, we find the relationship between job satisfaction trajectories and health to be stronger for mental health compared to physical health.
Bibliography Citation
Dirlam, Jonathan and Hui Zheng. "Job Satisfaction Developmental Trajectories and Health: A Life Course Perspective." Social Science and Medicine 178 (April 2017): 95-103.
3. Tumin, Dmitry
Zheng, Hui
Do the Health Benefits of Marriage Depend on the Likelihood of Marriage?
Journal of Marriage and Family 80,3 (June 2018): 622-636.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jomf.12471
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Status; Marriage

Marriage promotion initiatives presume substantial health benefits of marriage. Current literature, however, has provided inconsistent results on whether these benefits would be shared by people unlikely to marry. We investigate whether the physical and mental health benefits of marriage depend on the likelihood of marriage. Whereas prior studies have compared health benefits of marriage across a single predictor of marriage chances, we define the likelihood of marriage as a composite of demographic, economic, and health characteristics. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we find that married adults are only modestly healthier than unmarried adults in both physical and mental dimensions. People with a higher likelihood of marriage generally do not reap greater health benefits from marriage than their counterparts. The only exception is that continuous marriage is more strongly associated with improved mental health among men who are more likely to be married.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry and Hui Zheng. "Do the Health Benefits of Marriage Depend on the Likelihood of Marriage?" Journal of Marriage and Family 80,3 (June 2018): 622-636.
4. Tumin, Dmitry
Zheng, Hui
Propensity to Marry and Heterogeneity in the Health Benefits of Marriage
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Heterogeneity; Marriage; Propensity Scores

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marriage is associated with good health, but the protective effect of marriage varies widely, such that some people experience substantial health benefits from marriage and others experience no benefit. Our study explores if the marriage effect on health is moderated by the likelihood of marrying. Using propensity score methods, we test for heterogeneity in the marriage effect on self-rated health and a scale of depressive symptoms in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort. We find only modest differences in the marriage effect between the married and the unmarried, and no evidence that the marriage effect is positively or negatively associated with the propensity to marry. Our findings suggest that when the likelihood of marriage is defined as a composite of many early-life factors, it does not substantially moderate the health benefits of marriage, contradicting the hypothesis that the same factors discouraging marriage also make marriage less beneficial.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry and Hui Zheng. "Propensity to Marry and Heterogeneity in the Health Benefits of Marriage." Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.
5. Zheng, Hui
Why Does College Education Matter? Unveiling the Contributions of Selection Factors
Social Science Research 68 (November 2017): 59-73.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X17302302
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; College Degree; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Self-Esteem; Socioeconomic Factors

This study investigates the contributions of pre-college selection factors that may partially lead to the college degree - health link by using longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979) cohort. Propensity score matching method finds that the effects of college degree on various health outcomes (self-rated health, physical component summary index, health limitations, CESD scale) are reduced by 51% on average (range: 37%-70%) in the matched sample. Among these observed factors, cognitive skill is the biggest confounder, followed by pre-college health and socioeconomic characteristics (marital aspiration, years of schooling, marriage, fertility, poverty status) and non-cognitive skills (e.g., self-esteem). Rotter Internal-External Locus of Control scale is not significantly associated with all four health measures. The effects of most indicators of family background (parental education, family stability, family size, religious background) on the health of adult children are not direct but through offspring's early adulthood health and socioeconomic status.
Bibliography Citation
Zheng, Hui. "Why Does College Education Matter? Unveiling the Contributions of Selection Factors." Social Science Research 68 (November 2017): 59-73.