Search Results

Author: Ransom, Tyler
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Arcidiacono, Peter
Aucejo, Esteban M.
Maurel, Arnaud
Ransom, Tyler
College Attrition and the Dynamics of Information Revelation
NBER Working Paper No. 22325, National Bureau of Economic Research, June 2016.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w22325
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Attrition; College Enrollment; College Graduates; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Grade Point Average (GPA)/Grades; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Wages

This paper investigates the role played by informational frictions in college and the workplace. We estimate a dynamic structural model of schooling and work decisions, where individuals have imperfect information about their schooling ability and labor market productivity. We take into account the heterogeneity in schooling investments by distinguishing between two- and four-year colleges, graduate school, as well as science and non-science majors for four-year colleges. Individuals may also choose whether to work full-time, part-time, or not at all. A key feature of our approach is to account for correlated learning through college grades and wages, whereby individuals may leave or re-enter college as a result of the arrival of new information on their ability and productivity. Our findings indicate that the elimination of informational frictions would increase the college graduation rate by 9 percentage points, and would increase the college wage premium by 32.7 percentage points through increased sorting on ability.
Bibliography Citation
Arcidiacono, Peter, Esteban M. Aucejo, Arnaud Maurel and Tyler Ransom. "College Attrition and the Dynamics of Information Revelation." NBER Working Paper No. 22325, National Bureau of Economic Research, June 2016.
2. Ashworth, Jared
Hotz, V. Joseph
Maurel, Arnaud
Ransom, Tyler
Changes across Cohorts in Wage Returns to Schooling and Early Work Experiences
NBER Working Paper No. 24160, National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2017.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w24160
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Wages; Work Experience

This paper investigates the wage returns to schooling and actual early work experiences, and how these returns have changed over the past twenty years. Using the NLSY surveys, we develop and estimate a dynamic model of the joint schooling and work decisions that young men make in early adulthood, and quantify how they affect wages using a generalized Mincerian specification. Our results highlight the need to account for dynamic selection and changes in composition when analyzing changes in wage returns. In particular, we find that ignoring the selectivity of accumulated work experiences results in overstatement of the returns to education.
Bibliography Citation
Ashworth, Jared, V. Joseph Hotz, Arnaud Maurel and Tyler Ransom. "Changes across Cohorts in Wage Returns to Schooling and Early Work Experiences." NBER Working Paper No. 24160, National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2017.
3. Ashworth, Jared
Ransom, Tyler
Has the College Wage Premium Continued to Rise? Evidence from Multiple U.S. Surveys
Economics of Education Review 69 (April 2019): 149-154. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775718304862
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): American Community Survey; College Education; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Educational Returns; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP); Wages

This paper examines trends in the college wage premium (CWP) by birth cohort across the five major household surveys in the United States: the Census/ACS, CPS, NLSY, PSID, and SIPP. We document a general flattening in the CWP for birth cohorts 1970 and onward in each survey and even a decline for birth cohorts 1980-1984 in the NLSY. We discuss potential reasons for this finding and show that the empirical discrepancy is not a function of differences in composition across surveys. Our results provide crucial context for the vast economic literatures that use these surveys to answer important policy questions about intertemporal changes in the returns to skill.
Bibliography Citation
Ashworth, Jared and Tyler Ransom. "Has the College Wage Premium Continued to Rise? Evidence from Multiple U.S. Surveys." Economics of Education Review 69 (April 2019): 149-154. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775718304862.
4. Ransom, Michael R.
Ransom, Tyler
Do High School Sports Build or Reveal Character?
IZA Discussion Paper No. 11110, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), October 2017.
Also: http://ftp.iza.org/dp11110.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Keyword(s): Activities, After School; Educational Attainment; Exercise; High School Curriculum; Labor Force Participation; National Education Longitudinal Survey (NELS); National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); Obesity; Sports (also see ATHLETICS); Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We examine the extent to which participation in high school athletics has beneficial effects on future education, labor market, and health outcomes. Due to the absence of plausible instruments in observational data, we use recently developed methods that relate selection on observables with selection on unobservables to estimate bounds on the causal effect of athletics participation. We analyze these effects in the US separately for men and women using three different nationally representative longitudinal data sets that each link high school athletics participation with later-life outcomes. We do not find consistent evidence of individual benefits reported in many previous studies – once we have accounted for selection, high school athletes are no more likely to attend college, earn higher wages, or participate in the labor force. However, we do find that men (but not women) who participated in high school athletics are more likely to exercise regularly as adults. Nevertheless, athletes are no less likely to be obese.
Bibliography Citation
Ransom, Michael R. and Tyler Ransom. "Do High School Sports Build or Reveal Character?" IZA Discussion Paper No. 11110, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), October 2017.
5. Ransom, Michael R.
Ransom, Tyler
Do High School Sports Build or Reveal Character? Bounding Causal Estimates of Sports Participation
Economics of Education Review 64 (June 2018): 75-89.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775718300347
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Activities, After School; Educational Attainment; Exercise; High School Curriculum; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); National Education Longitudinal Survey (NELS); National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); Obesity; Sports (also see ATHLETICS)

We examine the extent to which participation in high school athletics in the United States has beneficial effects on future education, labor market, and health outcomes. Due to the absence of plausible instruments in observational data, we use recently developed methods that relate selection on observables with selection on unobservables to estimate bounds on the causal effect of athletics participation. We do not find consistent evidence of individual education or labor market benefits. However, we do find that male (but not female) athletes are more likely to exercise regularly as adults, but are no less likely to be obese.
Bibliography Citation
Ransom, Michael R. and Tyler Ransom. "Do High School Sports Build or Reveal Character? Bounding Causal Estimates of Sports Participation." Economics of Education Review 64 (June 2018): 75-89.
6. Ransom, Tyler
Dynamic Models of Human Capital Accumulation
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, Duke University, 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Employment, In-School; Wages; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the third essay, my coauthors and I investigate the evolution over the last two decades in the wage returns to schooling and early work experience. Using data from the 1979 and 1997 panels of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we isolate changes in skill prices from changes in composition by estimating a dynamic model of schooling and work decisions. Importantly, this allows us to account for the endogenous nature of the changes in educational and accumulated work experience over this time period. We find an increase over this period in the returns to working in high school, but a decrease in the returns to working while in college. We also find an increase in the incidence of working in college, but that any detrimental impact of in-college work experience is offset by changes in other observable characteristics. Overall, our decomposition of the evolution in skill premia suggests that both price and composition effects play an important role. The role of unobserved ability is also important.
Bibliography Citation
Ransom, Tyler. Dynamic Models of Human Capital Accumulation. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, Duke University, 2015.