Search Results

Author: Manser, Marilyn E.
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Brown, Murray
Manser, Marilyn E.
Estimation of the Demand for Marriage Based on a Bargaining Model
Discussion Paper No. 419, Economics Research Group, State University of New York at Buffalo, 1977
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: State University of New York Press
Keyword(s): Bargaining Model; Household Models; Marital Status; Marriage; Wages

The paper begins with a summary of the M-B model of household formation, deriving the conditions under which a marriage will take place, the reasoning underlying the threat point specification, and the effects on the marriage decision of changes in the exogenous variables, especially the effect of changes in the female wage rate. The marriage realization equation and its stochastic specification are given. For both whites and blacks, the wage and income variables are significant determinants of the marriage decision. If the marriage decision is responsive to the same factors that influence the fertility, labor supply, and consumption decisions of married couples, then the total impact of those factors on the latter decisions cannot be assessed without reference to changing marriage patterns.
Bibliography Citation
Brown, Murray and Marilyn E. Manser. "Estimation of the Demand for Marriage Based on a Bargaining Model." Discussion Paper No. 419, Economics Research Group, State University of New York at Buffalo, 1977.
2. Brown, Murray
Manser, Marilyn E.
Neoclassical and Bargaining Approaches to Household Decision-Making with an Application to the Household Labor Supply Decision
Presented: Vienna, Austria, Econometric Society, 1977
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Econometric Society
Keyword(s): Bargaining Model; Demography; Earnings; Household Demand; Household Models; Husbands, Income; Leisure; Marriage; Slutsky Matrix

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The authors focus on the differences in the household demand functions that derive from the neoclassical model on the one hand, and the bargaining solutions on the other hand. Using data for households which include nonworking wives, the authors obtain estimates of leisure demand functions which are based on our most general bargaining models and test various restrictions on them. The empirical results indicate that the neoclassical restrictions are not appropriate for our data. Specifically, the test for equal effects of male and female incomes on household demands is rejected and symmetry of the Slutsky Matrix is also rejected. The authors offer a bargaining approach as an alternative to the neoclassical complete system of demand equations.
Bibliography Citation
Brown, Murray and Marilyn E. Manser. "Neoclassical and Bargaining Approaches to Household Decision-Making with an Application to the Household Labor Supply Decision." Presented: Vienna, Austria, Econometric Society, 1977.
3. Manser, Marilyn E.
Existing Labor Market Data: Current and Potential Research Uses
Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 1995
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Employment; Labor Economics; Unemployment

Major new research questions and policy issues concerning labor markets have arisen in recent years. An overriding set of issues involves the perception that many jobs have become less secure and newly-created jobs may not be "good jobs" on a number of dimensions. Analysis of these issues requires understanding of contingent work and other non-traditional work arrangements, the pattern of individual job changes and career growth, the process of job destruction and creation, the structure of compensation, and what happens within firms. At the same time that there appear to be major changes in the labor market, there has been little change in the concepts used, the types of information collected, the surveys employed, or the way in which the data are processed and made available. The purpose of this paper is to set the stage for addressing the current needs for labor market information. The first part provides background for the conference by describing existing government data on employment, unemployment, and compensation and the major purposes of these data and by analyzing their uses in recent labor economics research. The second part of the paper is interpretive and more forward looking: it examines other possible uses of the data and problems in responding to changing needs for data.
Bibliography Citation
Manser, Marilyn E. "Existing Labor Market Data: Current and Potential Research Uses." Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 1995.
4. Manser, Marilyn E.
Brown, Murray
Bargaining Analyses of Household Decisions
In: Women in the Labor Market. CB Lloyd, et al., eds. New York, NY: Columbia University Press, 1979
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Keyword(s): Bargaining Model; Fertility; Household Demand; Household Models; Leisure; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The authors apply the bargaining models of household decision-making that were proposed and analyzed in their l977 study, focusing on several differences between these and the neoclassical approach. They show that retaining the received theory does not facilitate the determination of the interrelationships between types of marriage decisions and household demands, but that the bargaining theory does. They find that the bargaining models make possible an expanded set of econometric specifications for marriage, labor supply, and other household decisions and offer the promise of uncovering important elements in an economy-principally, the predominant type of marriage arrangement, its changes over time, and its impact on outcomes of the household decision-making process. Formal comments by Nancy M. Gordon and Orley Ashenfelter follow.
Bibliography Citation
Manser, Marilyn E. and Murray Brown. "Bargaining Analyses of Household Decisions" In: Women in the Labor Market. CB Lloyd, et al., eds. New York, NY: Columbia University Press, 1979
5. Manser, Marilyn E.
Pergamit, Michael R.
Peterson, Wanda B.
National Longitudinal Surveys: Development and Uses
Monthly Labor Review 113,7 (July 1990): 32-37.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/opub/mlr/1990/07/contents.htm
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Labor Market Surveys; Longitudinal Data Sets; Longitudinal Surveys; Mobility; NLS Description; Transition, School to Work; Well-Being

This paper summarizes NLS data used by economists, sociologists, and other researchers to examine such policy issues as employment and earnings; educational experience, achievement, and the transition from school to work; training programs; geographic mobility; relationships between the workplace and the well-being of the family; attitudes toward the military; and the retirement behavior of older workers. [ERIC EJ-412643]
Bibliography Citation
Manser, Marilyn E., Michael R. Pergamit and Wanda B. Peterson. "National Longitudinal Surveys: Development and Uses." Monthly Labor Review 113,7 (July 1990): 32-37.
6. Rothstein, Donna S.
Manser, Marilyn E.
The Relationship of Youth Employment to Future Educational Attainment and Labor Market Experience
In: The Report on the Youth Labor Force, Revised, Chapter 7. Washington, DC: Department of Labor November, 2000: pp. 68-76.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/rylf/pdf/chapter7.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Labor Market Outcomes; Work History; Work Hours

This chapter examines the relationship between youths' work activities while in school and their future educational attainment and labor market success. It begins with an overview of the economics literature concerning possible impacts. This overview is followed by an analysis of the most recent data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). By following the lives of the NLSY79 respondents over the last 20 years, this survey permits one to describe the relationship between the number of hours and weeks of work during school months while aged 16 and 17, and later outcomes in terms of college attendance, weeks worked each year, and the number of jobs held from age 18 through 30. However, as implied by the literature review, this relationship cannot be interpreted as showing cause and effect.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. and Marilyn E. Manser. "The Relationship of Youth Employment to Future Educational Attainment and Labor Market Experience " In: The Report on the Youth Labor Force, Revised, Chapter 7. Washington, DC: Department of Labor November, 2000: pp. 68-76.