Search Results

Author: Rothstein, Donna S.
Resulting in 27 citations.
1. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Pierret, Charles R.
Rothstein, Donna S.
The Impact of Family Structure Transitions on Youth Achievement: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY79
Demography 42,3 (August 2005): 447-468.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/p827q00p7x183118/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Marital Disruption; Marital Stability; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We investigated the sensitivity of measures of cognitive ability and socioemotional development to changes in parents' marital status using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979. We used several scores for each assessment, taken at different times relative to parents' marital transitions, which allowed us to trace the effects starting up to five years before a parent's change in marital status and continuing for up to six years afterward. It also allowed us to correct for the unobserved heterogeneity of the transition and nontransition samples by controlling for the child's fixed effect in estimating the time path of his or her response to the transition. We found that children from families with both biological parents scored significantly better on the BPI and the PIAT-math and PIAT-reading assessments than did children from nonintact families. However, much of the difference disappeared when we controlled for background variables. Furthermore, when we controlled for child fixed effects, we did not find significant longitudinal variation in these scores over long periods that encompass the marital transition. This finding suggests that most of the variation is due to cross-sectional differences and is not a result of marital transitions per se.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen, Charles R. Pierret and Donna S. Rothstein. "The Impact of Family Structure Transitions on Youth Achievement: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY79 ." Demography 42,3 (August 2005): 447-468.
2. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Pierret, Charles R.
Rothstein, Donna S.
The National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth: Research Highlights
Monthly Labor Review (September 2015): .
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/monthlylaborrev.2015.09.006
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Bureau of Labor Statistics; Data Sets Documentation; Research Methodology

To help mark the Monthly Labor Review's centennial, the editors invited several producers and users of BLS data to take a look back at the last 100 years. This article highlights research based on data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth. The studies presented demonstrate the breadth and uniqueness of the surveys, covering topics from employment and education to health and criminal behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen, Charles R. Pierret and Donna S. Rothstein. "The National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth: Research Highlights." Monthly Labor Review (September 2015): .
3. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Rothstein, Donna S.
Do Cognitive Skills Moderate the Influence of Neighborhood Disadvantage on Subsequent Educational Attainment?
Economics of Education Review 44 (February 2015): 83-99.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027277571400096X
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Cognitive Ability; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Educational Attainment; Educational Outcomes; Geocoded Data; Neighborhood Effects; Noncognitive Skills; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

This paper examines how neighborhood quality affects young adults' educational outcomes, and whether neighborhood effects are moderated by cognitive test scores and other proxies for investments during childhood. The empirical results imply that high cognitive test scores help young adults overcome the effects of having lived in a disadvantaged neighborhood during adolescence with respect to attainment of a high school diploma and enrollment in a two- or four-year college. The results are robust to using alternative proxies for investments in children, such as mother's highest grade completed and measures of non-cognitive skills.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Donna S. Rothstein. "Do Cognitive Skills Moderate the Influence of Neighborhood Disadvantage on Subsequent Educational Attainment? ." Economics of Education Review 44 (February 2015): 83-99.
4. Griffith, Amanda Leigh
Rothstein, Donna S.
Can't Get There From Here: The Decision To Apply To A Selective College
Economics of Education Review 28,5 (October 2009): 620-628.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775709000259
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Education; College Enrollment; Income Level; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale)

In an attempt to increase applications from low-income students, some selective 4-year colleges are developing programs to target and attract low-income students. However, relatively little research has looked at factors important in the college application process, and in particular, how these factors differ for low-income students. This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) to analyze factors influencing students' college application decisions, with a focus on the decision to apply to a selective 4-year college. We hypothesize that distance from a student's home to selective colleges may play a role in the application decision and differentially impact low-income students. Our results suggest that distance does matter, although the effects do not vary by family income level. [Copyright 2009 Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Griffith, Amanda Leigh and Donna S. Rothstein. "Can't Get There From Here: The Decision To Apply To A Selective College." Economics of Education Review 28,5 (October 2009): 620-628.
5. Neumark, David B.
Rothstein, Donna S.
Do School-To-Work Programs Help the "Forgotten Half"?
NBER Working Paper No. 11636, National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge MA, September 2005.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/W11636
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Apprenticeships; Gender Differences; Program Participation/Evaluation; Training, Post-School; Transition, School to Work; Vocational Guidance; Vocational Rehabilitation

This paper tests whether school-to-work (STW) programs are particularly beneficial for those less likely to go to college in their absence--often termed the "forgotten half"' in the STW literature. The empirical analysis is based on the NLSY97, which allows us to study six types of STW programs, including job shadowing, mentoring, coop, school enterprises, tech prep, and internships/apprenticeships. For men there is quite a bit of evidence that STW program participation is particularly advantageous for those in the forgotten half. For these men, specifically, mentoring and coop programs increase post-secondary education, and coop, school enterprise, and internship/apprenticeship programs boost employment and decrease idleness after leaving high school. There is less evidence that STW programs are particularly beneficial for women in the forgotten half, although internship/apprenticeship programs do lead to positive earnings effects concentrated among these women. (Abstract by the author.)
Bibliography Citation
Neumark, David B. and Donna S. Rothstein. "Do School-To-Work Programs Help the "Forgotten Half"?" NBER Working Paper No. 11636, National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge MA, September 2005.
6. Neumark, David B.
Rothstein, Donna S.
School-to-Career Programs and Transitions to Employment and Higher Education
NBER Working Paper No. 10060, National Bureau of Economic Research, November 2003.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w10060.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Employment; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Curriculum; Higher Education; Transition, School to Work

The 1994 Federal School-to-Work Opportunities Act (STWOA) provided more than $1.5 billion over five years to support increased career preparation activities in the country's public schools. However, the STWOA was not re-authorized, so state governments face decisions about levels of funding support for school-to-career (STC) programs. Coupled with the availability of a new longitudinal data source with rich information on STC programs the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) it is therefore an opportune time to study the effectiveness of STC programs. This paper uses the NLSY97 to assess the effects of STC programs on transitions to employment and higher education among youths leaving high school, with a focus on estimating the causal effects of this participation given possible non-random selection of youths into STC programs.
Bibliography Citation
Neumark, David B. and Donna S. Rothstein. "School-to-Career Programs and Transitions to Employment and Higher Education." NBER Working Paper No. 10060, National Bureau of Economic Research, November 2003.
7. Neumark, David B.
Rothstein, Donna S.
School-To-Career Programs and Transitions to Employment and Higher Education
Economics of Education Review 25,4 (August 2006): 374-393.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775706000173
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Employment; Higher Education; Transition, School to Work; Transitional Programs

The 1994 federal School-to-Work Opportunities Act (STWOA) provided more than $1.5 billion over 5 years to support increased career preparation activities in the country's public schools. A new longitudinal data source with rich information on school-to-career (STC) programs—the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97)—provides previously unparalleled opportunities to study the effectiveness of STC programs. This paper uses the NLSY97 to assess the effects of STC programs on transitions to employment and higher education among youths leaving high school, with a focus on attempting to estimate the causal effects of this participation given possible non-random selection of youths into STC programs. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR; Copyright 2006 Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Neumark, David B. and Donna S. Rothstein. "School-To-Career Programs and Transitions to Employment and Higher Education." Economics of Education Review 25,4 (August 2006): 374-393.
8. Pergamit, Michael R.
Pierret, Charles R.
Rothstein, Donna S.
Veum, Jonathan R.
Data Watch: The National Longitudinal Surveys
Journal of Economic Perspectives 15,2 (Spring 2001): 239-253.
Also: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.15.2.239
Cohort(s): NLS General, NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Employment; Longitudinal Data Sets; Longitudinal Surveys; NLS Description

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) are perhaps the oldest and longest running panel surveys of individuals in the United States. These surveys were originally started at the U.S. Department of Labor in the mid-1960s to examine employment issues faced by different segments of the U.S. population. The four "original cohorts" were Young Men, Young Women, Mature Women (women who had finished their childbearing and were returning to the labor force), and Older Men (men approaching retirement). Since that time, the NLS program has expanded to include two new cohorts of youth. Table 1 provides an overview of the NLS cohorts over time. The NLS surveys have been widely used for over a quarter of a century and across a large number of academic disciplines including economics, sociology, psychology, education, medicine, and public policy. Hundreds of Ph.D. dissertations and thousands of journal articles rely on NLS data. The success of the NLS program is in part attributable to three aspects of the surveys: high retention rates, careful design features, and the broad range of subject areas studied. Over the past decade, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 has been the most widely used and most important of the NLS data sets. Thus, rather than attempting to describe each of the longitudinal surveys in detail, this paper will convey the approach and scope of the NLS program by focusing primarily on NLSY79. The new youth cohort begun in 1997, the NLSY97, will be discussed further below.
Bibliography Citation
Pergamit, Michael R., Charles R. Pierret, Donna S. Rothstein and Jonathan R. Veum. "Data Watch: The National Longitudinal Surveys." Journal of Economic Perspectives 15,2 (Spring 2001): 239-253.
9. Rothstein, Donna S.
An Analysis of Long-Term Unemployment
Presented: Washington, DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 7-9, 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Racial Differences; Unemployment; Unemployment Duration; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty; Wages, Men

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We don’t know what proportion of individuals enter into a long-term unemployment spell over their labor market career, not just at a fixed point in time, how long it takes to find a job after a long-term unemployment spell, or how the spell affects wages over time. This paper provides a starting point for answering these questions. It uses the employment history of men in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) to estimate the hazards for entry into and exit from long-term spells of unemployment. It then estimates the wage costs over time associated with having had a long-term unemployment spell. The analysis focuses on respondents’ employment histories from their mid 20s, after initial labor market churning occurs, until their mid to late 40s and early 50s.

In my sample of NLSY79 men, over 25 percent experience at least one long-term spell of unemployment from their mid 20s through 2009. On average, the first spell lasts over a year. Hazard estimates show that being black, having lower educational attainment, and having lower cognitive test scores are associated with increased odds of entering into a first long-term spell of unemployment in any given month. Black men also have decreased odds of ending their first long-term spell in any given month through reemployment. Having a higher cognitive test score and having worked full-time at a job prior to the long-term spell are associated with increased odds of reemployment. The wage costs of a long-term spell are quite persistent, with large wage losses found 5 or more years after the 27th week of the long-term unemployment spell.

Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "An Analysis of Long-Term Unemployment." Presented: Washington, DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 7-9, 2013.
10. Rothstein, Donna S.
An Analysis of Long-term Unemployment
Monthly Labor Review (July 2016): .
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2016/article/an-analysis-of-long-term-unemployment.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Racial Differences; Unemployment; Unemployment Duration

This article uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) to examine long-term unemployment of men in the United States during their early careers and midcareers. Over 22 percent of men in the sample experienced at least one long-term spell of unemployment from their mid-20s through 2009. On average, the first spell lasted over 1 year. Logit estimates from hazard models showed that being black, having lower educational attainment, and having lower cognitive skills were associated with increased odds of having a long-term spell of unemployment in any given month. Hazard estimates also showed that black men had decreased odds of reemployment in any given month after onset of a long-term spell. Having a higher cognitive test score, being younger, and having been displaced on the prior job were associated with increased odds of reemployment. The wage costs of a long-term spell were persistent with wage losses found 5 years after onset of the first long-term unemployment spell.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "An Analysis of Long-term Unemployment." Monthly Labor Review (July 2016): .
11. Rothstein, Donna S.
Breastfeeding and Children's Early Cognitive Outcomes
Review of Economics and Statistics 95,3 (July 2013): 919-931.
Also: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/REST_a_00282
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: MIT Press
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Breastfeeding; Children, Academic Development; Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B, ECLS-K); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Pre-natal Care/Exposure

This paper investigates whether breastfeeding affects 5- to 6-year old children's cognitive development using three U.S. longitudinal data sets. The results for the full samples roughly point to a dose-response effect of breastfeeding on children's cognitive outcomes, with breastfeeding six months or more associated with about one-tenth of a standard deviation increase in cognitive test scores. The breastfeeding effects do not appear to be due to differences in maternal employment, cognitive ability, or parenting skills. In contrast, within-sibling results show no statistically significant breastfeeding effect.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "Breastfeeding and Children's Early Cognitive Outcomes." Review of Economics and Statistics 95,3 (July 2013): 919-931.
12. Rothstein, Donna S.
Entry into and Consequences of Nonstandard Work Arrangements
Monthly Labor Review 119,10 (October 1996): 75-82.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/opub/mlr/1996/10/art7abs.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Childbearing; Demography; Employment; Event History; Labor Market Demographics; Labor Supply; Marital Status; Time Use; Work Ethic

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth suggest that recent occurrences such as the birth of a child can affect the likelihood of entering different types of employment arrangements. This article explores the impact on workers aged 29 to 37 of being in a nonstandard employment arrangement. It examines the distribution of workers among various employment arrangements, then looks at aspects of work behavior and life "events" that may have influenced the likelihood of working in a nonstandard arrangement. It compares wages and hours worked on the previous job with those on the current nonstandard employment arrangements.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "Entry into and Consequences of Nonstandard Work Arrangements." Monthly Labor Review 119,10 (October 1996): 75-82.
13. Rothstein, Donna S.
Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in Early Career Matches Between Employees and Supervisors, and the Labor Market Outcomes of Young Employees
Ph.D. Dissertation, Cornell University, 1995
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Employment, Youth; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Industrial Relations; Labor Economics; Labor Market Outcomes; Racial Studies; Training, On-the-Job; Wage Growth; Wage Models; Wages

This dissertation evaluates whether the gender, race, and ethnicity match between employees and supervisors has an influence on employees' early career labor market attainments. Three simple theories are posited to help explain why supervisor gender, race, and ethnicity might affect employees' labor market outcomes; the expected empirical impacts of different supervisor and employee matches are derived under each model. These theories include employee preferences regarding supervisor gender, race, or ethnicity, differential productivity effects of supervisors on their employees, and the role of supervisors in providing on-the-job training and promotion opportunities for their employees. From these theories, empirically testable implications regarding current wages, perceived likelihood of promotion, and wage profiles are obtained; they are tested using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The empirical results suggest that for male employees and black and white female employees, there is a negative impact on current wages associated with working for a female supervisor. Working for a female supervisor is found to have no impact on individuals' perceived likelihood of promotion and minimal positive, significant effects for black and white men on employee wage growth. Working for a Hispanic supervisor is associated with lower wages for Hispanic men and women. This is followed by some positive relative wage growth for Hispanic women, and is accompanied by a negative effect on the perceived likelihood of a promotion for Hispanic men. Taken together, the empirical results do not provide strong, clear-cut support for any of the three theories. In addition, one cannot rule out that supervisor characteristics are serving as proxies for the 'type' of job held.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in Early Career Matches Between Employees and Supervisors, and the Labor Market Outcomes of Young Employees. Ph.D. Dissertation, Cornell University, 1995.
14. Rothstein, Donna S.
High School Employment and Youths' Academic Achievement
Journal of Human Resources 42,1 (Winter 2007): 194-213.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40057302
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Achievement; Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Employment, Youth; High School Employment; High School Transcripts; School Performance; Work Hours

This paper asks whether employment during high school impacts youths' grade point average. Unlike much of the prior literature, it allows for the endogeneity of the hours and dropout decisions, uses ASVAB test scores, and tests whether youth employment is dynamic. The results indicate that high school employment and its lag have small, negative impacts on academic grade point average for both males and females. The hours effects diminish when a fixed person effect is included, and they become statistically insignificant when hours are instrumented.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "High School Employment and Youths' Academic Achievement." Journal of Human Resources 42,1 (Winter 2007): 194-213.
15. Rothstein, Donna S.
Leaving a Job during the Great Recession: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979
Monthly Labor Review (December 2016):.
Also: https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2018/article/leaving-a-job-during-the-great-recession-evidence-from-the-national-longitudinal-survey-of-youth-1979.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Cognitive Ability; Economic Changes/Recession; Educational Attainment; Exits; Labor Force Participation

This article uses longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of young baby boomers to examine job leaving during a study period that runs from the early months of the Great Recession through a full year after the recession ended. Of the men and women who had worked at least 30 hours per week during the 6 weeks before the study period, more than 20 percent left a job at some point during this period. Men and women who left a job during the period tended to have lower educational attainment and lower cognitive test scores than those who did not leave a job. Job leavers experienced a large shift out of the labor force in the years after the recession ended, whereas those who did not leave a job experienced a more gradual shift.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "Leaving a Job during the Great Recession: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979." Monthly Labor Review (December 2016):.
16. Rothstein, Donna S.
Male Prime-age Nonworkers: Evidence from the NLSY97
Presented: Atlanta GA, American Economic Association Annual Meeting, January 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Male Sample; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The labor force participation rate of prime-age men has been mostly falling since the late 1960s, with steeper declines during recessionary periods. This paper uses longitudinal data to examine whether men's prior trajectories of schooling, work, family, income, health, incarceration, and living situations differ between nonworkers and their working peers. It also investigates whether non-work status is a transitory state, and whether parents, spouses, partners, or others are providing support. The data in this paper are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), which contains detailed histories about individuals' lives across multiple domains. This allows one to drill down past top-level information about employment and schooling to create a more nuanced picture involving support systems, criminal behaviors, family formation, health, disability, and youth expectations regarding educational attainment and future employment. At the 2015-16 NLSY97 survey date about 9 percent of men, who range in age from 30 to 36, had not worked in the prior year. Most of these men had never married, about a third lived in a household with a parent, and almost 20 percent were incarcerated at the time of the interview. The vast majority of men who did not work in the year prior to the 2015-16 interview also did not work much in earlier years.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "Male Prime-age Nonworkers: Evidence from the NLSY97." Presented: Atlanta GA, American Economic Association Annual Meeting, January 2019.
17. Rothstein, Donna S.
Male Prime-age Nonworkers: Evidence from the NLSY97
Monthly Labor Review (December 2020):.
Also: https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2020/article/male-prime-age-nonworkers-evidence-from-the-nlsy97.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Disadvantaged, Economically; Family Background and Culture; Labor Force Participation; Male Sample; Unemployment

The labor force participation rate of prime-age men (ages 25 to 54) has been mostly falling since the late 1960s, with steeper declines during recessionary periods. This article uses longitudinal data to examine whether men's prior trajectories of schooling, work, family, neighborhood, health, incarceration, and living situations are associated with nonwork status. It also investigates whether nonwork status is a transitory state and whether nonworkers are supported by family members. The data in this article are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), which provides detailed histories of respondents' lives across multiple domains. When the 2015-16 NLSY97 interview was conducted, about 8.5 percent of men, who, at the time, ranged in age from 30 to 36 years, had not worked in the prior year. More than two-thirds (70.0 percent) of these men had never married, nearly a third (30.6 percent) lived in a household with a parent, and 16.3 percent were incarcerated at the time of the interview. The vast majority of these men also did not work much in earlier years. Nonworkers not only are more disadvantaged in many aspects of their current lives--such as education, health, incarceration, and finances--but they also were disadvantaged earlier in their lives in terms of family and neighborhood background.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "Male Prime-age Nonworkers: Evidence from the NLSY97." Monthly Labor Review (December 2020):.
18. Rothstein, Donna S.
Men Who Do Not Work during Their Prime Years: What Do the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Data Reveal?
Report, Beyond The Numbers, Volume 8, No. 11, August 2019, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Also: https://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-8/male-nonworkers-nlsy.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Family Structure; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Incarceration/Jail; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Labor Force Participation; Unemployment; Work Histories

This report examines nonworking status across two generations of men. It evaluates whether men's prior work history as well as education, family structure, personal health, incarceration status, and living situations differ between nonworkers across the two cohorts and between nonworkers and their working peers within cohorts. The report uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97).
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "Men Who Do Not Work during Their Prime Years: What Do the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Data Reveal?" Report, Beyond The Numbers, Volume 8, No. 11, August 2019, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
19. Rothstein, Donna S.
Supervisory Status and Upper-level Supervisory Responsibilities: Evidence from the NLSY79
Working Paper 331, BLS Working Papers Series, September 2000.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/ore/pdf/ec000070.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Educational Attainment; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Gender Differences; Human Capital; Job Skills; Job Tenure; Racial Differences; Work Experience

This paper examines what it means to be a supervisor, in terms of what types of responsibilities are associated with supervisory status, who is more likely to have this authority, and what the wage consequences are from having these types of responsibilities. The results indicate that the wage returns to being a supervisor are not associated with simply having supervisory "status" or a supervisory title, per se, but rather from having associated upper-level supervisory responsibilities. While women are less likely to have supervisory status, once the status is attained, there is a small associated responsibility differential.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "Supervisory Status and Upper-level Supervisory Responsibilities: Evidence from the NLSY79." Working Paper 331, BLS Working Papers Series, September 2000.
20. Rothstein, Donna S.
Supervisory Status and Upper-Level Supervisory Responsibilities: Evidence from the NLSY79
Industrial and Labor Relations Review 54,3 (April 2001): 663-680.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2695996
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Earnings; Gender Differences; Job Promotion; Job Requirements; Job Status; Wage Levels; Wages

This paper examines what it means to be a supervisor, in terms of the associated responsibilities--their nature, who is likely to have them, and how they affect wages. The author examines data from a new series of questions on aspects of supervision included in the 1996 wave of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. The results indicate that the wage returns to being a supervisor are not associated with simply having supervisory "status" or a supervisory title, per se, but rather with having associated upper-level supervisory responsibilities. Women were less likely than men to attain supervisory status, and once they did so they were slightly less likely to have higher-level supervisory responsibilities.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "Supervisory Status and Upper-Level Supervisory Responsibilities: Evidence from the NLSY79." Industrial and Labor Relations Review 54,3 (April 2001): 663-680.
21. Rothstein, Donna S.
Youth Employment During School: Results from Two Longitudinal Surveys
Monthly Labor Review 124,8 (August 2001): 25-37
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2001/08/art4abs.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Absenteeism; College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Employment, In-School; Employment, Part-Time; Employment, Youth; Labor Market Outcomes; Work Hours

Students who worked 20 or fewer hours per week during the school year were more likely to attend college; youths who worked a greater percentage of weeks during the school year worked more consistently when they reached ages 18 to 30. According to a popular perception, youths work more today than in the past and their employment may not always lead to desirable consequences. The concern is that a young person's employment, particularly when the individual works many hours, may reduce study time, increase school lateness and absenteeism rates, and adversely affect grades. However, a youth's employment also may provide some positive benefits, teaching about workplace norms and responsibilities and helping to ease the person's subsequent transition from school to work full time. In addition, these costs and benefits associated with a person's working while young could have an impact on the individual's long-term educational and labor market outcomes.

The first part of this article compares the employment of today's youth with that of a youth cohort from nearly 20 years ago. It asks whether 15- and 16-year-olds are, in fact, more likely to work today and examines whether the likelihood of a young person's being employed while attending school varies across youths with different demographic characteristics. Also examined in this part is how the distribution of hours of work of 16-year-olds varies across the two cohorts. Data come from the first round of a new survey of youth -- the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) -- and from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). In the first round of each survey, 15- and 16-year-olds answered similar questions about their current employment status and hours of work. In addition, many demographic measures that may be associated with youths' decisions to work are similar across the two surveys.

Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "Youth Employment During School: Results from Two Longitudinal Surveys." Monthly Labor Review 124,8 (August 2001): 25-37.
22. Rothstein, Donna S.
Youth Employment in the United States
Monthly Labor Review 124,8 (August 2001): 6-17.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2001/08/art2abs.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Employment, Youth; Ethnic Groups; Family Structure; Gender Differences; Household Income; Racial Differences; Teenagers; Work Experience

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 show substantial work activity among 14- and 15-year-olds. Today's youths commonly gain employment experience through working for a particular employer, such as a fast-food restaurant, or through a less formal arrangement, such as babysitting for a neighbor. The purpose of this article is to provide a detailed profile of the employment of today's youths using round-1 data from a new survey of youth: the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. The article reports the incidence, intensity, and timing of youth employment, shows the industries and occupations in which youths commonly work, and examines employment differences across gender, race, ethnic group, household income, and family structure.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. "Youth Employment in the United States." Monthly Labor Review 124,8 (August 2001): 6-17.
23. Rothstein, Donna S.
Carr, Deborah
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Cohort Profile: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79)
International Journal of Epidemiology 48,1 (1 February 2019): 22-22e.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/ije/article/48/1/22/5049814
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): Bureau of Labor Statistics; Data Sets Documentation; NLS Description

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article gives a summary of the NLSY, providing information about why the cohort was set up, who is in the cohort, how often have the respondents been followed, what has been measured, how to gain access to the data, key findings and publications, main strengths and weaknesses, and funding,
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S., Deborah Carr and Elizabeth C. Cooksey. "Cohort Profile: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79)." International Journal of Epidemiology 48,1 (1 February 2019): 22-22e.
24. Rothstein, Donna S.
Herz, Diane E.
A Detailed Look at Employment of Youths Aged 12 to 15
In: The Report on the Youth Labor Force, Revised, Chapter 3. Washington, DC: Department of Labor Report, 2000: pp. 14-29.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/opub/rylf/pdf/chapter3.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Demography; Employment, Youth; Family Characteristics; Labor Market Outcomes; Transition, School to Work

This chapter examines employment patterns of youths using data from the first interview of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97). The NLSY97 was designed specifically to collect a wide range of information on youths in the United States. It provides insight into their labor market experiences, demographic and family characteristics, and participation in school-to-work programs, as well as many other aspects of their lives. The NLSY97 provides an in-depth focus on a cohort of youths who were between the ages of 12 and 16 on December 31, 1996. The first interview will be followed by annual interviews to develop longitudinal data. NLSY97 data complement data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of households that provides data on trends over time but does not track specific age cohorts. CPS information on employment trends of youths aged 15 to 17 is described in Chapter 4.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. and Diane E. Herz. "A Detailed Look at Employment of Youths Aged 12 to 15" In: The Report on the Youth Labor Force, Revised, Chapter 3. Washington, DC: Department of Labor Report, 2000: pp. 14-29.
25. Rothstein, Donna S.
Manser, Marilyn E.
The Relationship of Youth Employment to Future Educational Attainment and Labor Market Experience
In: The Report on the Youth Labor Force, Revised, Chapter 7. Washington, DC: Department of Labor November, 2000: pp. 68-76.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/rylf/pdf/chapter7.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Labor Market Outcomes; Work History; Work Hours

This chapter examines the relationship between youths' work activities while in school and their future educational attainment and labor market success. It begins with an overview of the economics literature concerning possible impacts. This overview is followed by an analysis of the most recent data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). By following the lives of the NLSY79 respondents over the last 20 years, this survey permits one to describe the relationship between the number of hours and weeks of work during school months while aged 16 and 17, and later outcomes in terms of college attendance, weeks worked each year, and the number of jobs held from age 18 through 30. However, as implied by the literature review, this relationship cannot be interpreted as showing cause and effect.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S. and Marilyn E. Manser. "The Relationship of Youth Employment to Future Educational Attainment and Labor Market Experience " In: The Report on the Youth Labor Force, Revised, Chapter 7. Washington, DC: Department of Labor November, 2000: pp. 68-76.
26. Rothstein, Donna S.
Pierret, Charles R.
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
The Impact of Family Structure Transitions on Youth Achievement: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY79
Presented: Atlanta, GA, Society of Government Economists, ASSA Program, January 2002
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Society of Government Economists (SGE)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Cognitive Ability; Family Structure; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

See also citation number 4151.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S., Charles R. Pierret and Alison Aileen Aughinbaugh. "The Impact of Family Structure Transitions on Youth Achievement: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY79." Presented: Atlanta, GA, Society of Government Economists, ASSA Program, January 2002.
27. Yates, Julie A.
Rothstein, Donna S.
The Newest National Longitudinal Survey: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997
Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 38,4 (October 1999): 604-610.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/0019-8676.00147/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Institute of Industrial Relations, University of California, Berkeley
Keyword(s): Education; Family Background and Culture; Labor Force Participation; Transition, School to Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The newest survey in the National Longitudinal Surveys program, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), represents the U.S. population born during 1980 through 1984. Round 1 of the annual survey took place in 1997 and is now available to the public. Using data from the longitudinal NLSY97 survey, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) will be able to identify characteristics that define today's youths' transition from school to the labor market and into adulthood. To achieve this, the NLSY97 survey collects extensive information on youths' labor market behavior, educational experiences, and family and community backgrounds from the youth respondents. One unique aspect of the NLSY97 is that round 1 contains a questionnaire asked of a parent or guardian that generates information about the youths' family background and history. This information will help researchers assess the impact of schooling and other environmental factors on these newest labor market entrants. Data from the NLSY97 also will aid in determining how youth experiences relate to establishing a career, participating in government programs, and forming a family.
Bibliography Citation
Yates, Julie A. and Donna S. Rothstein. "The Newest National Longitudinal Survey: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997." Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 38,4 (October 1999): 604-610.