Search Results

Author: Lee, Jaewon
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Koch, David W.
Lee, Jaewon
Lee, Kyunghee
Coloring the War on Drugs: Arrest Disparities in Black, Brown, and White
Race and Social Problems 8,4 (December 2016): 313-325.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12552-016-9185-6
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Arrests; Drug Use; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) data, this study examines racial disparities in arrests for drug offending. Of the total 8984 NLSY97 participants, the study sample was restricted to the 4868 respondents who had ever reported using drugs (black = 1191, Hispanic = 980, white = 2697). The study questions are as follows: (1) Are there racial disparities in arrests for drug use, after controlling for incidence of drug use as well as other socio-demographic variables? (2) Are there racial disparities in arrests for drug dealing, after controlling for incidence of drug dealing as well as other socio-demographic variables? Compared with whites, blacks were more likely to be arrested for drug offending, even after controlling for incidence and other socio-demographic variables. Several socio-demographic variables, particularly gender, were also associated with arrests for drug offending. Bans on racial profiling and other legislative and policy changes are considered as potential strategies to ameliorate drug enforcement disparities.
Bibliography Citation
Koch, David W., Jaewon Lee and Kyunghee Lee. "Coloring the War on Drugs: Arrest Disparities in Black, Brown, and White." Race and Social Problems 8,4 (December 2016): 313-325.
2. Lee, Jaewon
Trajectories of Mental Health across Baby Boomers: Latent Growth Curve Modeling for Depression
Social Work in Mental Health published online (25 October 2019): DOI: 10.1080/15332985.2019.1683674.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15332985.2019.1683674
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Health, Mental; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the trajectories of mental health across baby boomers to understand their mental health during middle age. This study used secondary data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and used four points in time to estimate trajectories of mental health during adulthood. This study included 834 participants who were born in 1959. The Latent Growth Curve Model (LGCM) was used for modeling and estimating the trajectories of mental health. The trajectories of mental health show non-linear change even after considering longitudinal changes of variables. The trajectories indicate a V-shaped curve: higher depression at 34 and 50 years of age and the lowest depression at 40 years. Males predicted lower intercepts of depression and those with higher self-esteem showed lower depression initially. This study provides further evidence for understanding baby boomers' mental health during their adulthood within a longitudinal setting by using a nationwide sample. More specialized interventions and services should be considered for females' mental health problems over time. It is also important to help individuals develop and cultivate their self-esteem before entering into middle age.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon. "Trajectories of Mental Health across Baby Boomers: Latent Growth Curve Modeling for Depression." Social Work in Mental Health published online (25 October 2019): DOI: 10.1080/15332985.2019.1683674.
3. Lee, Jaewon
Trajectories of Mental Health and the Impact of Economic Well-Being across Middle Aged Adults
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Social Work, Michigan State University, 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Economic Well-Being; Health, Mental; Net Worth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Mental health is one of several important factors to sustain one's well-being, and as such, poor mental health can lead to significant problems in one's quality of life. Although mental illnesses are prevalent in middle-aged adults and the importance of mental health in general has been discussed in many studies, mental health across middle-aged adults has received less attention. Levels of depression have changed over time and lack of economic resources influences mental health. The purpose of this study is to examine trajectories of mental health among middle-aged adults, to investigate which factors influence the trajectories of mental health, and to explore the effects of economic well-being on mental health during middle age.

The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), which is a nation-wide representative data set for individuals in the United States, was used for analysis. A sample of 834 individuals who discussed their mental health status at four points in time (34, 36, 40, and 50 years of age) was analyzed. The latent growth model was conducted using M-plus statistical package. The research questions are as follows: 1) What are the trajectories of mental health among middle aged-adults (34 to 50 years of age)? 2) Is economic well-being (net worth and employment) associated with mental health?

Major findings reported in this study were that the trajectories of mental health show non-linear change, with lowest levels of depression at 40 and higher levels of depression at 34, 36, and 50 years of age. Male, self-esteem, cognitive ability, health insurance, employment, and net worth predicted lower intercepts of depression. In addition, even after including time-varying covariates, the trajectories of mental health still show non-linear change. Employment was associated with lower risks of depression at 34, 36, 40, and 50 years, and net worth was also associated with lower risks of depression at 34, 36, and 50 years.

Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon. Trajectories of Mental Health and the Impact of Economic Well-Being across Middle Aged Adults. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Social Work, Michigan State University, 2018.
4. Lee, Jaewon
Allen, Jennifer
Mother's Educational Attainment and their Young Adult Daughters' Fast Food Intake: The Role of Race/Ethnicity
Health Care for Women International published online (26 September 2019): DOI: 10.1080/07399332.2019.1669606.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07399332.2019.1669606
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Education; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The relationship between mothers' educational attainment and their daughters' fast food intake and the moderating effect of race/ethnicity on the relationship was examined. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 for Children and Young Adults (NLSY79 CY) were used. Young women with mothers who received higher education were less likely to eat fast food. Race/ethnicity moderated the relationship between mothers' educational attainment and their young adult daughters' fast food intake. Through this study, we seek to understand the intergenerational relationship between mother and daughter and the effect of mothers' education on their young adult children's fast food consumption. Providing more opportunities for mothers to increase their educational attainment should be considered to reduce their children's fast food intake. Mothers’ educational attainment should be focused on more closely for non-Hispanic Whites as a factor to reduce young women’s fast food intake, and other economic factors should be considered to understand the role of mothers' educational attainment among African Americans and Hispanic/Latinas.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jennifer Allen. "Mother's Educational Attainment and their Young Adult Daughters' Fast Food Intake: The Role of Race/Ethnicity." Health Care for Women International published online (26 September 2019): DOI: 10.1080/07399332.2019.1669606.
5. Lee, Jaewon
Ortiz, Daniel Velez
The Intergenerational Effects of Maternal Depression on Their Young Adult Children's Depression
Presented: New Orleans LA, Society for Social Work and Research Annual Conference, January 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR)
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Health; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: Depression affects females more than males. Maternal depression has been found to have adverse impacts on children's developmental outcomes. However, little research have been addressed on intergenerational effects on depression across three generations. The present study examined the effects of maternal depression in young adulthood and late adulthood on their children's depression. Specific questions include: 1) What are the individual and environmental determinants for maternal depression in young and late adulthood? 2) Does maternal depression in young and late adulthood affect their children's depression? 3) Does maternal depression in young adulthood influence depression in late adulthood?

Methods: The present study used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 (NLSY 79) collected from 1979 to 2012 and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 for Children and Young Adults collected from 1986 to 2012. The two sets of data were merged, and children were matched with their mother. Approximately 4,000 pairs were selected for the study sample. The sample included 1937 White, 1319 Black, and 853 Hispanic children. Depression was measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale, which was used for both mothers and their children. Baseline variables (age, education, marital status, the Armed Forces Qualification Test, urban/rural region, poverty status, employment) were included. Ordinary linear regression analyses were conducted to examine the research questions.

Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Daniel Velez Ortiz. "The Intergenerational Effects of Maternal Depression on Their Young Adult Children's Depression." Presented: New Orleans LA, Society for Social Work and Research Annual Conference, January 2017.
6. Lee, Jaewon
Seon, Jisuk
Educational Attainment and Health Behaviors Among Young Adult Men: Racial/Ethnic Disparities
American Journal of Men's Health 13,6 (November-December 2019): DOI: 10.1177/1557988319894488.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1557988319894488
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Health Care; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Male Sample; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although promoting health behaviors are important for sustaining physical and mental health, little is known about young adult men's health behaviors or how they vary across race and ethnicity. This study examines the impact of educational attainment on health behaviors across young adult men, and differences in the association across race/ethnicity. This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Children and Young Adults. The final sample consists of 3,115 non-Hispanic White males, 1,617 African American males, and 1,144 Hispanic males. The average age of the participants was about 27 years old. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Educational attainment was associated with both food intake and preventive health care visits. Those who received a higher education were less likely to eat fast food than those who did not...and were more likely to eat fruits and vegetables... Higher education was also positively associated with routine eye exams and health check-ups... This study identified interaction effects between educational attainment and African Americans for predicting fast food intake... Education is one way to improve health behaviors and to lessen racial/ethnic disparities in health behaviors. Specifically, promoting health behaviors in education should target African American men to improve their perception toward the importance of healthy food intake.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jisuk Seon. "Educational Attainment and Health Behaviors Among Young Adult Men: Racial/Ethnic Disparities ." American Journal of Men's Health 13,6 (November-December 2019): DOI: 10.1177/1557988319894488.
7. Lee, Jaewon
Seon, Jisuk
Intergenerational Transmission of Maternal Poverty to Self-esteem among Young Adult Children: The Role of Employment
Children and Youth Services Review 106 (November 2019): 104492.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740919306218
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Employment; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Labor Force Participation; Mothers, Income; Poverty; Self-Esteem

Objectives: This study explores the underlying pathways of the intergenerational relationship linking parents' poverty, children's self-esteem and employment among young adults.

Methods: This study used two data sets from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 for Children and Young Adults (NLSY79 CY). A total of 9584 dyads was used for the final sample. The mediation model suggested by Baron and Kenny (1986) was used to examine.

Results: Young adult children whose mother is in poverty are less likely to be employed compared to their counterparts with a mother not in poverty. Maternal poverty is significantly associated with young adult children's self-esteem. Young adult children's employment is statistically related to their self-esteem. Young adult children's employment status mediated the relationship between maternal poverty and young adult children's self-esteem.

Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jisuk Seon. "Intergenerational Transmission of Maternal Poverty to Self-esteem among Young Adult Children: The Role of Employment." Children and Youth Services Review 106 (November 2019): 104492.
8. Lee, Jaewon
Sun, Fei
Intergenerational Economic Mobility Between Mothers and Children: Racial and Ethnic Disparities
Family Relations: Interdisciplinary Journal of Applied Family Science published online (20 January 20): DOI: 10.1111/fare.12424.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/fare.12424
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Economic; Mothers, Income; Net Worth; Poverty; Racial Differences

Objectives: This study focuses on the impact of race and ethnicity on intergenerational mobility between mothers and children.

Methods: The current study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 for Children and Young Adults. The two data sets were merged based on mother and child's identification number. The final sample consisted of 1,245 non‐Black/non‐Hispanic, 740 Black, and 538 Hispanic dyads. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression analyses were conducted.

Results: There are ethnic and racial disparities in net worth and poverty among mothers. Black and Hispanic mothers were less likely to accumulate net worth compared with non‐Black/non‐Hispanic mothers, and they were also at greater risk of being in poverty compared with non‐Black/non‐Hispanic mothers. For intergenerational economic mobility, net worth and not living in poverty across mothers were associated with higher income among young adult children. Black race moderated the relationship between maternal net worth and young adult children's income.

Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Fei Sun. "Intergenerational Economic Mobility Between Mothers and Children: Racial and Ethnic Disparities." Family Relations: Interdisciplinary Journal of Applied Family Science published online (20 January 20): DOI: 10.1111/fare.12424.