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Author: Hassett-Walker, Connie
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Hassett-Walker, Connie
Delinquency and the Black Middle Class: An Exploratory Study
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice 8,4 (October 2010): 266-289.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15377938.2010.526868
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Arrests; Black Studies; Black Youth; Criminal Justice System; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Factors

This study addresses the lack of criminal justice research on non-poor African Americans. The author empirically tested ideas from Pattillo-McCoy (1998, 1999) using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The main research question was what causal factors predict delinquency among middle class Blacks. Having delinquent friends predicted a greater likelihood of future arrest among middle class Blacks but a lesser likelihood among poorer African Americans, suggesting different processes at work. Indicators of parental relationship problems had more of an impact on poor Black and White youth than on middle class youth of either race. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Hassett-Walker, Connie. "Delinquency and the Black Middle Class: An Exploratory Study." Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice 8,4 (October 2010): 266-289.
2. Hassett-Walker, Connie
Shadden, Mark
Examining Arrest and Cigarette Smoking in Emerging Adulthood
Tobacco Use Insights published online (6 February 2020): DOI: 10.1177/1179173X20904350.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1179173X20904350
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Arrests; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Gender Differences; Racial Differences; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: Despite prior studies, transitions in smoking patterns are not fully understood. Getting arrested may alter an individual's smoking pattern through processes proscribed by the criminological labeling theory. This study examined how arrest during emerging adulthood altered smoking behavior during subsequent years and whether there were differential effects by race/ethnicity and gender.

Methods: We analyzed 15 waves of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Multinomial logistic regressions were performed using Stata software version 14.

Results: For both genders, arrested black men and women had the most distinct smoking transitions (both increases and decreases) as compared with their non-arrested counterparts. Among men, particularly black males, arrest in early adulthood was associated with the men transitioning to both increased and decreased smoking. Patterns in smoking transitions for women were less clear, suggesting that women's smoking may be influenced by factors not in the models. Women had a low probability of starting to smoke or increasing smoking if they were never arrested between 18 and 21 years of age.

Bibliography Citation
Hassett-Walker, Connie and Mark Shadden. "Examining Arrest and Cigarette Smoking in Emerging Adulthood." Tobacco Use Insights published online (6 February 2020): DOI: 10.1177/1179173X20904350.
3. Hassett-Walker, Connie
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Bell, Bethany A.
Fisk, Calley E.
Shadden, Mark
Zhou, Weidan
How Does Early Adulthood Arrest Alter Substance use Behavior? Are There Differential Effects by Race/Ethnicity and Gender?
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology 3,2 (June 2017): 196-220.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40865-017-0060-y
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Arrests; Criminal Justice System; Drug Use; Gender Differences; Racial Differences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Much criminal justice research has ignored racial/ethnic and gender differences in substance use subsequent to criminal justice involvement. This paper investigated how early adulthood arrest (i.e., 18 to 21 years of age) influences individuals' subsequent transitions from non-substance use to substance use and substance use to non-substance use through age 30. We also consider if these relationships differ by race/ethnicity and gender. Processes proscribed by labeling theory subsequent to getting arrested are considered.
Bibliography Citation
Hassett-Walker, Connie, Katrina Michelle Walsemann, Bethany A. Bell, Calley E. Fisk, Mark Shadden and Weidan Zhou. "How Does Early Adulthood Arrest Alter Substance use Behavior? Are There Differential Effects by Race/Ethnicity and Gender?" Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology 3,2 (June 2017): 196-220.