Search Results

Author: Harden, K. Paige
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Cheung, Amanda K.
Harden, K. Paige
Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.
Gene x Environment Interactions in Early Externalizing Behaviors: Parental Emotional Support and Socioeconomic Context as Moderators of Genetic Influences?
Behavior Genetics 44,5 (September 2014): 468-486.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24980660
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Children, Behavioral Development; Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B, ECLS-K); Family Income; Genetics; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parental Influences; Siblings; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses longitudinal population-based samples of young siblings to examine the effects of two hypothesized moderators of early externalizing behaviors: parental emotional support and family socioeconomic status. The first sample, a twin sample from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), was composed of approximately 600 twin pairs measured on externalizing at ages 4 and 5. Results indicated stronger genetic influences on externalizing at lower levels of parental emotional support but higher levels of socioeconomic status; only the latter interaction remained significant when the two moderators were simultaneously modeled. These moderation effects were not replicated in our analyses of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement (CNLSY) data, which contained 1939 pairs of full and half siblings measured on externalizing at ages 4-5 and ages 6-7. Our results highlight the need for replication in quantitative behavior genetics research on externalizing behaviors. Potential causes for non-replication are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Cheung, Amanda K., K. Paige Harden and Elliot M. Tucker-Drob. "Gene x Environment Interactions in Early Externalizing Behaviors: Parental Emotional Support and Socioeconomic Context as Moderators of Genetic Influences?" Behavior Genetics 44,5 (September 2014): 468-486.
2. D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Waldman, Irwin D.
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Harden, K. Paige
Rathouz, Paul J.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
Smoking During Pregnancy And Offspring Externalizing Problems: An Exploration of Genetic and Environmental Confounds
Development and Psychopathology 20,1 (Winter 2008): 139-164.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=1641960&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0954579408000072
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Attention/Attention Deficit; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Genetics; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous studies have documented that smoking during pregnancy (SDP) is associated with offspring externalizing problems, even when measured covariates were used to control for possible confounds. However, the association may be because of nonmeasured environmental and genetic factors that increase risk for offspring externalizing problems. The current project used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and their children, ages 4-10 years, to explore the relations between SDP and offspring conduct problems (CPs), oppositional defiant problems (ODPs), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity problems (ADHPs) using methodological and statistical controls for confounds. When offspring were compared to their own siblings who differed in their exposure to prenatal nicotine, there was no effect of SDP on offspring CP and ODP. This suggests that SDP does not have a causal effect on offspring CP and ODP. There was a small association between SDP and ADHP, consistent with a causal effect of SDP, but the magnitude of the association was greatly reduced by methodological and statistical controls. Genetically informed analyses suggest that unmeasured environmental variables influencing both SDP and offspring externalizing behaviors account for the previously observed associations. That is, the current analyses imply that important unidentified environmental factors account for the association between SDP and offspring externalizing problems, not teratogenic effects of SDP.
Bibliography Citation
D'Onofrio, Brian M., Carol A. Van Hulle, Irwin D. Waldman, Joseph Lee Rodgers, K. Paige Harden, Paul J. Rathouz and Benjamin B. Lahey. "Smoking During Pregnancy And Offspring Externalizing Problems: An Exploration of Genetic and Environmental Confounds." Development and Psychopathology 20,1 (Winter 2008): 139-164.
3. Harden, K. Paige
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Turkheimer, Eric
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Waldman, Irwin D.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
Population Density And Youth Antisocial Behavior
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 50,8 (2009): 999-1008.
Also: http://journals.ohiolink.edu.proxy.lib.ohio-state.edu/ejc/pdf.cgi/Paige_Harden_K.pdf?issn=00219630&issue=v50i0008&article=999_pdayab
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Bayesian; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Ethnic Differences; Geocoded Data; Kinship; Modeling, Multilevel; Mothers, Behavior; Neighborhood Effects; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Racial Differences; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Urbanization/Urban Living

Theoretical models concerning how neighborhood contexts adversely influence juvenile antisocial behavior frequently focus on urban neighborhoods; however, previous studies comparing urban and rural areas on the prevalence of youth antisocial behavior have yielded mixed results. The current study uses longitudinal data on the offspring of a nationally representative sample of mothers (N = 4,886) in the US. There was no relation between density and mother-reported child conduct problems across ages 4–13 years, but youth living in areas of greater population density exhibited more youth self-reported delinquency across 10–17 years. Families often moved to counties with greater or lesser population density, but longitudinal analyses treating population density as a time-varying covariate did not support the hypothesis that living in densely populated counties influenced youth delinquency. Rather, the association between population density and delinquency appears to be due to unmeasured selection variables that differ between families who live in more or less densely populated counties. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Harden, K. Paige, Brian M. D'Onofrio, Carol A. Van Hulle, Eric Turkheimer, Joseph Lee Rodgers, Irwin D. Waldman and Benjamin B. Lahey. "Population Density And Youth Antisocial Behavior." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 50,8 (2009): 999-1008.
4. Harden, K. Paige
Quinn, Patrick D.
Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.
Genetically Influenced Change in Sensation Seeking Drives the Rise of Delinquent Behavior during Adolescence
Developmental Science 15,1 (January 2012): 150-163.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-7687.2011.01115.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Genetics; Kinship; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Risk-Taking; Siblings

Sensation seeking is associated with an increased propensity for delinquency, and emerging research on personality change suggests that mean levels of sensation seeking increase substantially from childhood to adolescence. The current study tested whether individual differences in the rate of change of sensation seeking predicted within-person change in delinquent behavior and whether genetically influenced differences in rate of personality change accounted for this association. Sensation seeking and delinquent behavior were assessed biennially between ages 10–11 and 16–17 in a nationally representative sample of 7675 youths from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth: Children and Young Adults (CNLSY). Analyses using latent growth curve modeling found that within-person change in sensation seeking was significantly and positively correlated with within-person change in delinquency from childhood to adolescence. Furthermore, behavioral genetic analyses of a subset of 2562 sibling pairs indicated that there were substantial genetic influences on both initial levels of sensation seeking and change in sensation seeking during early adolescence, with over 80% of individual differences in change due to genetic factors. Finally, these genetically driven increases in sensation seeking were most important for predicting increases in delinquency, whereas environmental paths between sensation seeking and delinquency were not significant. These results suggest that developmental changes in delinquent behaviors during adolescence are driven by a genetically governed process of personality change.
Bibliography Citation
Harden, K. Paige, Patrick D. Quinn and Elliot M. Tucker-Drob. "Genetically Influenced Change in Sensation Seeking Drives the Rise of Delinquent Behavior during Adolescence." Developmental Science 15,1 (January 2012): 150-163.
5. Harden, K. Paige
Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.
Individual Differences in the Development of Sensation Seeking and Impulsivity during Adolescence: Further Evidence for a Dual Systems Model
Developmental Psychology 47,3 (May 2011): 739-746.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/dev/47/3/739/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Genetics; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Risk-Taking; Scale Construction; Siblings

Consistent with social neuroscience perspectives on adolescent development, previous cross-sectional research has found diverging mean age-related trends for sensation seeking and impulsivity during adolescence. The present study uses longitudinal data on 7,640 youth from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth Children and Young Adults, a nationally representative sample assessed biennially from 1994 to 2006. Latent growth curve models were used to investigate mean age-related changes in self-reports of impulsivity and sensation seeking from ages 12 to 24 years, as well individual differences in these changes. Three novel findings are reported. First, impulsivity and sensation seeking showed diverging patterns of longitudinal change at the population level. Second, there was substantial person-to-person variation in the magnitudes of developmental change in both impulsivity and sensation seeking, with some teenagers showing rapid changes as they matured and others maintaining relatively constant levels with age. Finally, the correlation between age-related changes in impulsivity and sensation seeking was modest and not significant. Together, these results constitute the first support for the dual systems model of adolescent development to derive from longitudinal behavioral data. © 2011 APA, all rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Harden, K. Paige and Elliot M. Tucker-Drob. "Individual Differences in the Development of Sensation Seeking and Impulsivity during Adolescence: Further Evidence for a Dual Systems Model." Developmental Psychology 47,3 (May 2011): 739-746.
6. Kretsch, Natalie
Harden, K. Paige
Marriage, Divorce, and Alcohol Use in Young Adulthood: A Longitudinal Sibling-Comparison Study
Emerging Adulthood 2,2 (June 2014): 138-149.
Also: http://eax.sagepub.com/content/2/2/138.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Divorce; Gender Differences; Marital Status; Marriage; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marital status is a robust predictor of alcohol consumption in young adulthood; however, the extent to which observed associations are due to socialization or selection processes is unclear. The current study examined associations between marital status and alcohol use, assessed in a sample of 5,150 young adults (ages 18–30) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. A longitudinal sibling-comparison design controlled for family-level environmental and genetic selection factors and for an individual’s premarital trajectory of alcohol use. Nested model comparisons tested whether gender and age moderated the effects of marriage and divorce. Controlling for selection factors, the transition into marriage predicted decreases in alcohol consumption, and this effect was consistent across gender and age. Divorce predicted increased consumption, particularly for men. Findings support a causal relationship between changes in marital status and alcohol use, rather than an association due to selection factors and suggest gender-specific changes in alcohol use following divorce.
Bibliography Citation
Kretsch, Natalie and K. Paige Harden. "Marriage, Divorce, and Alcohol Use in Young Adulthood: A Longitudinal Sibling-Comparison Study." Emerging Adulthood 2,2 (June 2014): 138-149.
7. Mendle, Jane
Harden, K. Paige
Turkheimer, Eric
Van Hulle, Carol A.
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Emery, Robert E.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
Associations Between Father Absence and Age of First Sexual Intercourse
Child Development 80,5 (September/October 2009): 1463-1480.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01345.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Age at First Intercourse; Family Structure; Fathers, Absence; Genetics; Kinship; Sexual Activity; Siblings

Children raised without a biological father in the household have earlier average ages of first sexual intercourse than children raised in father-present households. Competing theoretical perspectives have attributed this either to effects of father absence on socialization and physical maturation or to nonrandom selection of children predisposed for early sexual intercourse into father-absent households. Genetically informative analyses of the children of sister dyads (N = 1,382, aged 14–21 years) support the selection hypothesis: This association seems attributable to confounded risks, most likely genetic in origin, which correlated both with likelihood of father absence and early sexual behavior. This holds implications for environmental theories of maturation and suggests that previous research may have inadvertently overestimated the role of family structure in reproductive maturation.
Bibliography Citation
Mendle, Jane, K. Paige Harden, Eric Turkheimer, Carol A. Van Hulle, Brian M. D'Onofrio, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Joseph Lee Rodgers, Robert E. Emery and Benjamin B. Lahey. "Associations Between Father Absence and Age of First Sexual Intercourse." Child Development 80,5 (September/October 2009): 1463-1480.
8. Mendle, Jane
Harden, K. Paige
Van Hulle, Carol A.
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Emery, Robert E.
Turkheimer, Eric
Father Absence and Early Sexual Activity: Revisiting Evolutionary Theories
Presented: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Behavior Genetics Association 37th Annual Meeting, June 5, 2007.
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Age at First Intercourse; Fathers, Absence; Genetics; Kinship; Modeling, Multilevel; Sexual Activity; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Children raised without a biological father present in the household are more likely to exhibit precocious and risky sexual behavior during adolescence. Most explanations for this association invoke an evolutionary mechanism: individuals have evolved such that early childhood environment influences the particular reproductive strategies manifest later in life. The developmental pathways presaging adult reproductive behavior are especially sensitive to the father's family role and the quality of paternal care is believed to affect sexual development independent of other stressors in the family system. Although these theories conceptualize early sexual activity as a consequence of familial stress, a genetic predisposition for risky sexual behavior may manifest in father absence in parents and in precocious sexual maturation in children. One means of clarifying the role of father absence in timing of first intercourse is through studying offspring of twins and/or sisters. If the association between timing of intercourse and paternal absence is an artifact of familial risk, the age of first intercourse in children of discordant sibling dyads will be comparable -- despite the differing environmental circumstances in which these cousins were raised. This alternative hypothesis was tested in a sample of adolescent children from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), using multilevel survival models adapted from the more common children of-twins (CoT) design. Results were not consistent with a causal role of father absence on offspring sexuality; children who experienced father absence did not differ in age of first intercourse from either siblings or cousins raised with present fathers. But, these children did differ from those who had no father absence in either their nuclear or extended family. This suggests that it is not father absence, per se, but rather some familial factor correlated with father absence that produces this association.
Bibliography Citation
Mendle, Jane, K. Paige Harden, Carol A. Van Hulle, Brian M. D'Onofrio, Benjamin B. Lahey, Joseph Lee Rodgers, Robert E. Emery and Eric Turkheimer. "Father Absence and Early Sexual Activity: Revisiting Evolutionary Theories." Presented: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Behavior Genetics Association 37th Annual Meeting, June 5, 2007.
9. Quinn, Patrick D.
Harden, K. Paige
Differential Changes in Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking and the Escalation of Substance Use from Adolescence to Early Adulthood
Development and Psychopathology 25, Special Issue 01 (February 2013): 223-239.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8833710
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Alcohol Use; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Drug Use; Family Income; Genetics; Kinship; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Mothers, Behavior; Risk-Taking; Siblings; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent evidence suggests that impulsivity and sensation seeking are not stable risk factors for substance use among adolescents and early adults but rather that they undergo significant developmental maturation and change. Further, developmental trends of both personality facets may vary across individuals. In the current investigation, we used longitudinal data from ages 15 to 26 on 5,632 individuals drawn from the offspring generation of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine whether interindividual differences in intraindividual change in impulsivity and sensation seeking predicted the escalation of alcohol, marijuana, and cigarette use in adolescence and early adulthood. Latent growth curve models revealed significant individual differences in rates of change in both personality and substance use. Age-related changes in personality were positively associated with individual differences in substance-use change. Individuals who declined more slowly in impulsivity increased in alcohol, marijuana, and cigarette more rapidly, whereas individuals who declined more slowly in sensation seeking increased more rapidly in alcohol use only. Although risk for substance use across the population may peak during adolescence and early adulthood, this risk may be highest among those who decline more gradually in impulsivity.
Bibliography Citation
Quinn, Patrick D. and K. Paige Harden. "Differential Changes in Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking and the Escalation of Substance Use from Adolescence to Early Adulthood." Development and Psychopathology 25, Special Issue 01 (February 2013): 223-239.