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Author: Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Cheung, Amanda K.
Harden, K. Paige
Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.
Gene x Environment Interactions in Early Externalizing Behaviors: Parental Emotional Support and Socioeconomic Context as Moderators of Genetic Influences?
Behavior Genetics 44,5 (September 2014): 468-486.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24980660
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Children, Behavioral Development; Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B, ECLS-K); Family Income; Genetics; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parental Influences; Siblings; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses longitudinal population-based samples of young siblings to examine the effects of two hypothesized moderators of early externalizing behaviors: parental emotional support and family socioeconomic status. The first sample, a twin sample from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), was composed of approximately 600 twin pairs measured on externalizing at ages 4 and 5. Results indicated stronger genetic influences on externalizing at lower levels of parental emotional support but higher levels of socioeconomic status; only the latter interaction remained significant when the two moderators were simultaneously modeled. These moderation effects were not replicated in our analyses of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement (CNLSY) data, which contained 1939 pairs of full and half siblings measured on externalizing at ages 4-5 and ages 6-7. Our results highlight the need for replication in quantitative behavior genetics research on externalizing behaviors. Potential causes for non-replication are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Cheung, Amanda K., K. Paige Harden and Elliot M. Tucker-Drob. "Gene x Environment Interactions in Early Externalizing Behaviors: Parental Emotional Support and Socioeconomic Context as Moderators of Genetic Influences?" Behavior Genetics 44,5 (September 2014): 468-486.
2. Harden, K. Paige
Quinn, Patrick D.
Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.
Genetically Influenced Change in Sensation Seeking Drives the Rise of Delinquent Behavior during Adolescence
Developmental Science 15,1 (January 2012): 150-163.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-7687.2011.01115.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Genetics; Kinship; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Risk-Taking; Siblings

Sensation seeking is associated with an increased propensity for delinquency, and emerging research on personality change suggests that mean levels of sensation seeking increase substantially from childhood to adolescence. The current study tested whether individual differences in the rate of change of sensation seeking predicted within-person change in delinquent behavior and whether genetically influenced differences in rate of personality change accounted for this association. Sensation seeking and delinquent behavior were assessed biennially between ages 10–11 and 16–17 in a nationally representative sample of 7675 youths from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth: Children and Young Adults (CNLSY). Analyses using latent growth curve modeling found that within-person change in sensation seeking was significantly and positively correlated with within-person change in delinquency from childhood to adolescence. Furthermore, behavioral genetic analyses of a subset of 2562 sibling pairs indicated that there were substantial genetic influences on both initial levels of sensation seeking and change in sensation seeking during early adolescence, with over 80% of individual differences in change due to genetic factors. Finally, these genetically driven increases in sensation seeking were most important for predicting increases in delinquency, whereas environmental paths between sensation seeking and delinquency were not significant. These results suggest that developmental changes in delinquent behaviors during adolescence are driven by a genetically governed process of personality change.
Bibliography Citation
Harden, K. Paige, Patrick D. Quinn and Elliot M. Tucker-Drob. "Genetically Influenced Change in Sensation Seeking Drives the Rise of Delinquent Behavior during Adolescence." Developmental Science 15,1 (January 2012): 150-163.
3. Harden, K. Paige
Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.
Individual Differences in the Development of Sensation Seeking and Impulsivity during Adolescence: Further Evidence for a Dual Systems Model
Developmental Psychology 47,3 (May 2011): 739-746.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/dev/47/3/739/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Genetics; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Risk-Taking; Scale Construction; Siblings

Consistent with social neuroscience perspectives on adolescent development, previous cross-sectional research has found diverging mean age-related trends for sensation seeking and impulsivity during adolescence. The present study uses longitudinal data on 7,640 youth from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth Children and Young Adults, a nationally representative sample assessed biennially from 1994 to 2006. Latent growth curve models were used to investigate mean age-related changes in self-reports of impulsivity and sensation seeking from ages 12 to 24 years, as well individual differences in these changes. Three novel findings are reported. First, impulsivity and sensation seeking showed diverging patterns of longitudinal change at the population level. Second, there was substantial person-to-person variation in the magnitudes of developmental change in both impulsivity and sensation seeking, with some teenagers showing rapid changes as they matured and others maintaining relatively constant levels with age. Finally, the correlation between age-related changes in impulsivity and sensation seeking was modest and not significant. Together, these results constitute the first support for the dual systems model of adolescent development to derive from longitudinal behavioral data. © 2011 APA, all rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Harden, K. Paige and Elliot M. Tucker-Drob. "Individual Differences in the Development of Sensation Seeking and Impulsivity during Adolescence: Further Evidence for a Dual Systems Model." Developmental Psychology 47,3 (May 2011): 739-746.